Greenbelt Trail

Trail Map

Description Suggest an Edit

The Greenbelt Trail is one of two trails connected by two bridges on two rivers in two states. The Greenbelt Trail runs up the Snake River between the cities of Clarkston and Asotin in Washington. Across the river, in Lewiston, Idaho, the Lewiston Levee Parkway Trail runs up the Snake River and also has a segment on the Clearwater River. The two trails form what the Army Corps of Engineers call the Clearwater and Snake River National Recreation Trail. Cycle, walk or run both, and you get to see a lot of river and enjoy a nice smooth asphalt surface. Two bridges on the Snake connect the trails, offering some loop options.

On the Washington side, the Greenbelt Trail starts at Granite Lake Park then ascends the Snake River for nearly 7 miles to Chief Looking Glass Park in Asotin. The first 4 miles run along the Snake River beneath a canopy of shade trees and through several parks. You'll welcome the shade along this stretch during hot summer days, but be sure to bring plenty of water for the non-shaded portions.

Parking and Trail Access

To access the northern trailhead, take US 12 to Clarkston. From there, take 13th Street north towards the river for nearly 0.5 mile until it intersects with Port Way. Turn right on Port Way and travel a short distance until you reach Granite Lake Park, which offers drinking fountains, restrooms and abundant parking.

Additional trailheads for the Greenbelt Trail can be found in Clarkston at Greenbelt Ramp at the intersection of Fair Street and Riverview Boulevard and at various other locations along Riverside Drive/State Route 129. In Asotin, begin your journey at Chief Looking Glass Park, located along SR 129 just east of Clemans Road.

Reviews

TRAILBEAR: SHADE BEAR – On the Greenbelt Trail

   December, 2010 by trailbear

TRAILBEAR: SHADE BEAR – On the Greenbelt Trail 9/13/2010, Clarkston, WA. @@@ OVERVIEW Two states, two rivers, two trails – it’s Lewiston, ID and Clarkston, WA and each has a trail running up their side of the Snake River, built by the Corps of ...read more