• Bethpage Bikeway

    State: NY
    Length: 12.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Bethpage Bikeway is one of Long Island's most popular trails. It connects Merrick Road in Massapequa with Bethpage State Park, and includes additional trail north to Trail View State Park in Woodbury. There are a few parkway exit crossings and a few moderately busy street crossings but safe for families with kids. All crossings are clearly marked, and drivers are generally courteous and alert.

    A major road crossing at Sunrise Highway, near the trail's southern end, has a stop light and crossing lane for safety.

  • Branford Trolley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Concrete, Crushed Stone, Gravel

    The Branford Trolley Trail is essentially a long footbridge occupying an old bridge along the route of an abandoned trolley track. The bridge links nature trails on both sides of the water through a marsh habitat that is home to many shorebirds, fish, mammals and invertebrates.

    The trail is part of the growing Shoreline Greenway Trail that will one day stretch 25 miles through four towns along Connecticut's southern coast.

  • Briarcliff-Peekskill Trailway

    State: NY
    Length: 12 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Grass

    The Briarcliff-Peekskill Trailway is a 12-mile linear park that runs from the town of Ossining north to Westchester County's Blue Mountain Reservation in Peekskill. The trail is built on land orginally acquired in 1929 by the Westchester Parkway Commission for the construction of the Briarcliff Peekskill Parkway. Construction of the parkway, however, was confined to an area between Route 117 in Pleasantville and the New York State National Guard Armory in Ossining. In 1977, the remaining right-of-way was re-designated a trailway.

    The trailway affords walkers many beautiful vistas along the way, including views of water cascading over the magnificent stone spillway at Westchester County's Croton Gorge Park and a view of the Hudson River from the 560-foot high Spitzenberg Mountain at Blue Mountain Reservation.

    For more information and brochures of Westchester County operated trails, call the Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation at 914-864-PARK, or write the Department at 25 Moore Avenue, Mount Kisco, NY 10549.
  • Bronx River Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 18.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Dirt

    The Bronx River Greenway will one day stretch 23 miles along the river through New York's Westchester and Bronx counties. Currently, 18 miles of the trail are complete in disconnected segments largely paralleling the Bronx River Parkway. The pathway is part of the Bronx River Reservation, an 807-acre linear park that was established when the Bronx River Parkway was being built. The road opened in 1925.

    The pathway's paved sections include: a 1-mile loop near Oak Street in Mount Vernon beginning and ending at Oak Street; 4.6 miles between Palmer Road in Bronxville and Crane Road at Scarsdale Avenue in Scarsdale, with a loop around the small lake in Bronxville; 5 miles between Greenacres Avenue in Hartsdale and Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla; as well as several miles east of Woodlawn Cemetery, along Bronx Park, and through Starlight Park and Sound View Park.

    One of the more unusual sights along the way are the tall silos of Concrete Plant Park, which pay homage to New York City's industrial past. The seven-acre site also features a boat launch, waterfront promenade, and chess tables.

    During spring and autumn, portions of the Bronx River Parkway are closed to motor vehicles, making a nice alternative to the path for bikes and other trail users.

  • Charter Oak Greenway

    State: CT
    Length: 9.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Charter Oak Greenway is a paved, multi-use trail connecting parks and the Captain John Bissell Greenway in East Hartford with residential and commercial areas. The trail runs for 9.8 miles between Forbes Street in East Hartford and Porter Street in Bolton. About 0.5 mile of the trail is on-road.

    The trail provides seasonal access to restrooms, picnic areas, athletic facilities, tennis court and playground equipment at Charter Oak Park. Bike lockers are available at the intersection of Route 83 and Charter Oak Street, as well as at the Spencer Street commuter lot. The trail has some steep hills.

  • Cross Island Parkway Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Cross Island Parkway Trail closely follows its namesake thoroughfare through northeastern Queens. From its northern end, you will soon enter Little Bay Park, which offers lovely views of the Throgs Neck Bridge and the bay.

    If you get thirsty or hungry mid-trail, a snack bar is available at the Bayside Marina, a pleasant place to rest with scenic views of the water, sailboats and open sky. Further south, two adjacent parks, John Golden Park and Crocheron Park, offer picturesque scenery, places to picnic and athletic fields.

    The trail ends at the doorstep to Alley Pond Park, which encompasses a diverse mix of marsh, forest and meadow habitats. Visit the park's Alley Pond Environmental Center (228-06 Northern Boulevard) to extend your journey on its nature trails or to learn more about the area and its wildlife through the center's educational programming.
  • D & H Canal Park

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass

    Owned by the County of Orange and maintained by the Orange County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation, the D&H Canal Park is a 300-acre park with a one mile section of the Delaware and Hudson Canal (1825-1898) and a number of historic canal-era buildings. A National Historic Landmark, the D&H Canal Park is open every day from dawn to dusk.

    Park visitors can:

    Walk, bike, and cross country ski along the D&H Canal Towpath Trail; fish in the Neversink River; picnic or barbeque at the D&H Canal Park Visitor Center; or visit the Neversink Valley Area Museum.

    Rest rooms are available at the Visitor Center.
  • Derby Greenway

    State: CT
    Length: 1.85 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Derby Greenway runs between Division Street and Main Street, paralleling the Naugatuck and Housatonic rivers. The trail runs on top of a flood control dyke for the rivers; a portion of it goes across O'Sullivan's Island. One of the centerpieces of the trail is the footbridge on the Housatonic side from which you get great views of the river.

    The Derby Greenway will eventually be part of the larger Naugatuck Valley Greenway. The trail will eventually cross the Naugatuck River to Shelton. In addition, the town of Ansonia is currently designing sections that will be linked to the Derby Greenway.

    The trail is open from dawn to dusk.

  • Farmington Canal Heritage Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 40 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Crushed Stone, Grass, Gravel

    Running north from the Yale University campus in New Haven through the heart of Connecticut, the multi-use Farmington Canal Heritage Trail, when completed will stretch uninterrupted more than 80 miles from New Haven to Northampton, Massachusetts. As of summer 2011, 72% is completed in CT and 47% is completed in MA. Only a few small pieces need to be completed in New Haven, and there is a 4.7-mile gap in Cheshire.

    The largest remaining gap includes northern Southington, all of Plainville and southern Farmington: 9.1 miles. You can now ride from Farmington to Westfield, MA on 27 continuous miles of paved off-road trail. The 6.3-mile segment consisting of all of Southwick, MA was completed in 2010. Southampton, Westfield and Southwick are left to go to connect with the miles of trails father north.

    The trail follows the corridor of the defunct Farmington Canal, New England's onetime longest canal. Completed in 1835, the waterway stretched 87 miles from New Haven to Northampton, boasting 28 locks and three aqueducts. Traces of the canal remain throughout the Farmington Valley. Most notable is Lock 12, a trailside museum in Cheshire that centers on the restored lock.

    Southern Section

    Anchoring the trail's southern terminus is Yale's Malone Engineering Building, designed by prominent architect Caesar Pelli. A landscaped setting and reproduced streetlamps lend atmosphere to this asphalt urban path. There is no designated trail parking, but on-street or garage parking is available.

    The Hamden to Cheshire section is completed and extends 15.1 miles, ending at Cornwall Avenue. Woods soon line the asphalt path, and you'll cross bridge after bridge over a meandering stream. To learn about the corridor's canal and railroad roots, pause to read trailside historical markers and watch for the old brick depot and adjacent freight house just past the second parking area. Approaching Cheshire, you'll reach t

  • Farmington River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 14.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    The Farmington River Trail is built upon the former Central New England Railroad corridor and runs between the Farmington Canal Heritage Trail near Tunxis Meade Park and the Simsbury town line. A short disconnected section of trail extends between Bushy Hill Road to Hopmeadow Street, paralleling Village Rd./West St./Rt 167. The two segments can be linked by taking Stratton Brook State Park Trail, with a on-road section along Town Forest Road, from Stratton Brook Road, at the south end of the park.

  • Harlem Valley Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 16.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    Harlem Valley Rail Trail provides a scenic ride through rolling farm fields and dense woods on the bed of the New York and Harlem Railroad that ran from New York City to Chatham. The rail-trail is being built in segments, and there is still work to be done to open all 46 miles of the planned trail. For now, you can enjoy three disconnected segments, which total 16 miles.

    The southern end of the trail begins at the Metro North Railroad Station in Wassaic. It is possible, during non-rush hours and on weekends, to board a Metro North train in Grand Central Station and in a little more than two hours be peddling or walking along this rail-trail. As the paved trail winds north for nearly 11 miles to Millerton, it passes through a pastoral scene. Farmland stretches before and around you, followed by red-cedar scrubland and beaver ponds. In Amenia, the trailhead parking lot is on the site of the former Barton House, a large hotel that was frequented by business people and vacationers traveling from New York City.

    Several railroad stations on this line have been restored: Sharon Station is now a private residence located off the trail in the town of North East. Millerton's three stations have been restored and today house local businesses. North of Coleman Station the trail crosses six reconstructed railroad bridges.

    The railroad builders tamed the area's rolling terrain, and created a level corridor, by blasting through rock and building the rail bed up from the land adjacent to the corridor for a "pyramiding" effect. In several stretches, north of Route 61, the trail's higher elevation on steep embankments—in some places dropping 50 feet—provides spectacular views of the surrounding farmland. Indian Mountain, straddling the border of New York and Connecticut, is to the east. Traveling through a series of deep rock cuts, you will feel the temperature drop several degrees from the surrounding landscape.

    Millerton is the current

  • Hook Mountain/Nyack Beach Bikeway

    State: NY
    Length: 4.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    While not a "rail-trail," the Hook Mountain/Nyack Beach Bikeway is a very scenic trail along the Hudson River in Rockland County.

    The southern half of this trail is flat and runs right along the river at sea level. It is wheelchair accessible from the parking lot at Nyack Beach State Park and even beginner bicyclists can easily travel on it. There is a paved connection to the Rockland Lake State Park area from this trail.

    The northern half of the trail is hilly, narrow and quite rocky. It runs along the cliffs and should only be ridden by experienced bicyclists riding bikes in good condition.

    Great views of the Hudson River and Palisades Cliffs rock formations are available from either trail segment.

    If you live in the Rockland County area this trail shouldn't be missed.
  • Housatonic Rail-Trail in Trumbull (Pequonnock Valley Greenway)

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Crushed Stone

    The Housatonic Rail-Trail in Trumbull, a.k.a., the Pequonnock Valley Greenway, offers a shady respite from suburban Trumbull, this fairly flat trail overlooks the winding Pequonnock River for much of its 3.4 miles. Rapids and distinctive rock outcrops add interest. The trail begins on the railroad corridor, strays from it, then returns to emerge at Old Mine Park.

    The trail starts at Tait Road with an asphalt entryway up a short hill. From the signboard near Whitney Avenue to the Monroe town line, the trail is paved with asphalt. The segment through the Pequonnock River Valley has a smooth stone dust surface. Because Route 25 crosses the original railroad right-of-way, there is a short hill to climb in Parlor Rock Park (an early 20th-century amusement area) to access the wooden bridge under Route 25.

    Through Old Mine Park, the trail parallels the park entry road. (Note: Trummbull restricts parking to residents and issues tickets to vehicles without a Trumball parking sticker.) Use caution when crossing busy Route 111/Monroe Turnpike.

    Shortly after Route 111, the trail splits: the original trail, which is a rough dirt and gravel surface, continues straight. A newer paved trail involves a climb, bears right and ends just before the Victorinox property in Monroe. From Victorinox, turn left and cross through the parking lot. Just after crossing a bridge, turn left on the dirt surface to resume the trail to Maple Drive. To continue on the Monroe segment of the rail-trail, follow Maple Drive to Purdy Hill Road; turn right and go a short distance. The trail continues on the left across from the animal shelter.

  • Housatonic Valley Rail-Trail in Monroe

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 4.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    The Housatonic Rail-Trail in Monroe is a northern continuation of the Trumbull segment of the rail-trail. Locals refer to it as the Monroe Housatonic Railbed Trail. The 4.3-mile trail is largely forested and is a convenient bike route to William E. Wolfe Park. Visiting rail-trail users also gravitate around the park, which centers on Great Hollow Lake's attractive sand beach and swimming area, restrooms and picnic tables. Non-motorized boating is permitted on the 16-acre lake, and a paved pedestrian-only walking path circles its shoreline.

    The Housatonic trailhead is accessible via the entrance road to the lake, just off the left shoulder at a bend in the road. You'll need to purchase a day-use sticker to park here. The rail-trail's crushed stone surface is generally compact enough even for wheelchair use.

    Watch for traces of the Housatonic Railroad, one of New England's first rail lines, which carried passengers and freight between Monroe and Bridgeport. The most notable remnant is a stone-arch bridge, on the Connecticut List of Historic Places. Also note the drill holes amid cuts blasted through solid rock for the rail corridor.

    The rail-trail crosses area roads several times and includes a short on-road detour at the stone-arch bridge near the trail midpoint. You'll veer through a residential cul-de-sac then turn left and follow Pepper Street for 0.25 mile before rejoining the trail. At the 4-mile mark, you'll cross Pepper Street for the last time. After another 0.25 mile, you'll reach trail's end at a large dirt pile on the Newtown town line.

  • Hudson River Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Hudson River Greenway provides a continuous 11-mile route between Battery Park at the southern tip of Manhattan and the Little Red Lighthouse underneath the George Washington Bridge. The trail passes through Hudson River Park, Riverside Park South, Riverside Park and Fort Washington Park.

  • Hutchinson River Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Hutchinson River Greenway offers a convenient alternative to the Hutchinson River Parkway, which it closely follows. Although adjacent to the busy thoroughfare, trees have been planted along the route to help beautify the path and trail-goers can also catch glimpses of the river on their journey. If you wish to continue south to Ferry Point Park to enjoy spectacular views of the Manhattan skyline and the waterfront, a bike lane along Brush Avenue will take you there.

    Future plans include extending the trail north to Co-op City, a sprawling residential area, and Pelham Bay Park, an expansive natural area of marsh and forest habitat.
  • Hyde Park Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 10 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    The Hyde Park Trail is a 10-mile system connecting national historic sites, town parks and nature preserves in Hyde Park, New York. The trail connects the national historic sites of Vanderbilt Mansion, Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Eleanor Roosevelt ("Val-Kill"). The Hyde Park Trail is the first designated section of the Hudson River Valley Greenway Trail.

    In addition to this primary trail, other nearby loop trails include the Winnakee Nature Preserve, Hackett Hill Park and Pinewoods Park. For maps and other information, visit http://www.hydeparkny.us/Recreation/Trails/.

    Future connections include a proposed trail south along the Poughkeepsie waterfront and north to Norrie State Park.

    Bicycles are permitted on Roosevelt Farm Lane only (connecting the Home of FDR with Val-Kill) from March through November. For a brochure or trail map, contact:

    Hyde Park Recreation Department
    845-229-8086.

  • Jack Harrington White Plains Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.2 miles
    Surface: Woodchips

    The Jack Harrington White Plains Greenway was recently renamed to honor a long-time member of the city's conservation board. The trail's corridor follows the former New York, Westchester & Boston Railway right-of-way, extending from a City parking lot at Mamaroneck Avenue opposite Bloomingdale Road to the Scarsdale border.

    Part of the corridor, the section between the parking lot at Mamaroneck Avenue and Gedney Way, is unimproved and currently inaccessible. This section is 0.4 miles long.

    The part of the corridor that offers a useable, improved trail begins at the intersection of Gedney Way and Pleasant Avenue, where you will find a large brown sign with yellow lettering. From Gedney Way, the usable trail heads south, adjacent to the DPW facility and residential neighborhoods. The trail is 0.8 miles long between Gedney Way and Ridgeway. From Ridgeway to the Scarsdale border, the trail is 0.5 miles long, ending at a small swamp.

    Use of the entire Greenway is restricted to pedestrian traffic. Note that several major streets intersect the Greenway, including Bryant Avenue, Gedney Way, and Ridgeway. The surface is very well maintained with wood chips and has been cleared of nearly all trees since Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
  • John Kieran Nature Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel, Woodchips

    The John Kieran Nature Trail is a short loop that borders Van Cortlandt Lake and its associated wetlands. It is a wonderful site for bird-watching. The trail also passes several sites of significance including an old cemetery and the 67-acre Parade Ground, a large field that was once the site of a large Native American settlement. A portion of the trail is on the former Putnam Line of the New York Central Railroad that once connected New York City to Brewster and points north.
  • Jones Beach Bikeway (Ellen Farrant Memorial Bikeway)

    State: NY
    Length: 5.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Jones Beach Bikeway is a paved bicycle and pedestrian path on the southwestern end of Long Island that parallels Wantagh Parkway from Seaford to Jones Beach State Park. The trail is also known by two other names: Ellen Farrant Memorial Bikeway and Wantagh State Parkway Shared-Use Path.

    At the trail's northern end is Cedar Creek Park, which offers a spacious 259 acres on which to play tennis, basketball, softball, football, and soccer. Other amenities include an archery range, large playground, dog run, roller rink, sledding hills, and even an aerodrome field for radio-controlled airplanes.

    A new extension on the trail's southern end, which opened in May 2013, gives trail-goers a direct connection to Jones Beach and the boardwalk. A new storage facility for 100 bicycles is also being constructed adjacent to the park's East Bath House.

    Future plans include connecting the trail to the planned Ocean Parkway Bike Path, which would start at Jones Beach State Park and stretch 14 miles east along the scenic coastal roadway.
  • Jones Point Path

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

    The Jones Point Path occupies an abandoned motor vehicle route (old US Route 9W). The path provides bicyclists with a relatively safe bypass to a dangerous section of busy US Route 9W near Bear Mountain, NY. It also serves as a connecting trail between two poplular parking lots/trail heads used by day hikers.
  • Joseph B. Clarke Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    These three contiguous trails—the Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail, Old Erie Path and Joseph B. Clarke Trail—occupy the former right-of-way of the Erie Railroad's Nyack and Piermont Branch. Each trail is fairly short but taken together they make for a wonderful experience along the banks of the Hudson River.

    The Joseph B. Clark Trail travels between Greenbush Road and Oak Tree Road, traversing neighborhoods, the village of Sparkill and forested areas. There are bridges over, and viaducts under, busy highways and roads, with some street-level crossings to be cautious of. Northeast of Sparkhill village the trail links up with the Old Erie Path along Piermont Avenue.

  • Kennedy Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.7 miles
    Surface: Cinder

    The Kennedy Trail begins at the northwest corner of the 68-acre campus of John F. Kennedy Catholic High School in Somers. The town, which sits 30 miles from White Plains and 55 miles from New York City, is home to an IBM campus and Pepsi headquarters.

    The cinder trail, built on a former rail bed, winds through a heavily wooded area for just under 2 miles. Along the way, keep an eye out for old railroad ties and muddy patches of trail.
  • Kings Park Hike & Bike Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Kings Park Hike & Bike Trail runs for 1.5 miles between Old Dock Road at Church Street in Kings Park and Nissequogue River State Park. The trail is a town of Smithtown park and follows an abandoned railroad corridor that was once an old spur to Kings Park State Hospital.

    There are plans to extend the trail from its current end at Old Dock Rock south along the park to Main Street.

  • Klara Sauer Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Klara Sauer Trail (formerly known as the Beacon Riverside Trail) runs for 1 mile along the Hudson River on the west side of New York's village of Beacon. The trail occupies the same corridor as the live commuter rail, between the Beacon train station and Dennings Point.

    The trail is natural surface and wheelchair accessible. Cyclists, walkers and anglers use the trail, which also offers nice bird-watching along the river. You can link to another mile or so of trail at Dennings Point on the southern end of the Klara Sauer Trail. There are plans to link the trail to others in the area.

  • Kress Family Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    The Kress Family Trail follows an old rail bed of the former Shepaug Railroad, which winds along the Shepaug River. The flat, 2.5-mile trail is popular with cross-country skiers and snowshoers in winter, while hikers enjoy the trail during the rest of the year.

    The trail links with other trails in the Golden Harvest, Erbacher and River Road preserves, which together with Orzech Farm Preserve comprise nearly 600 contiguous acres.

  • Larkin State Park Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 10.4 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    Canopied with deciduous trees for most of its 10.4 miles, the Larkin State Park Trail (a.k.a. Larkin Bridle Path) is primarily a wilderness trail, with wooded vistas, wetland views and sparse residential development. Its railroad past began in 1881 with completion of the New York & New England Railroad between western Connecticut and New York. Following bankruptcy in 1894, the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad took over the line until 1939. Dr. Charles L. Larkin purchased the corridor and gifted it to the state in 1943 for a bridle trail.

    Because it's a bridle trail, equestrians use this trail frequently, so if you're on bike, remember to approach horses slowly and quietly; speak softly and take your cues from their riders. You may need to stop and dismount until they pass, as horses have the right-of-way.

    Typical of rail-trails in southwest Connecticut, the route plies a gentle grade across rolling topography, occasionally slicing through rock outcrops or overlooking low-lying areas. The trail's crushed-stone surface is typically firm, especially in the eastern and middle portions. Surface conditions are rougher along the western section, which is rockier and somewhat eroded, making it more suitable for mountain bikes.

    Near the trail midpoint at Long Meadow Road, you'll briefly leave state-owned property for a 0.5-mile on-road detour along a privately held stretch. Turn left on Long Meadow Road and right on Towantic Hill Road, then watch for trail access on the left side of the road. The onward trail offers lovely views of the boggy shoreline of Towantic Pond, then passes over wetlands on a causeway.

    Near the west end, a short section between State Route 67 and Curt Smith Road is often wet and washouts persist. Hurrican Irene did some damage in 2011. At some of the numerous road crossings, the trail descends or rises steeply to the road, and approaching motorists may not see you; use caution. There are no crosswalks.

  • Middlebury Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 4.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The delightful asphalt Middlebury Greenway winds 4.4 miles through the residential community of Middlebury, connecting businesses, parks and neighborhoods. The popular trail offers residents an off-road option for running errands and welcomes car-weary travelers on nearby Interstate 84 who wish to stretch their legs in a convenient and comfortable setting. While State Route 64 parallels the greenway for its entire length, the road won't lessen your enjoyment.

    Tracing a Connecticut Company trolley line that first operated in 1908, the trail follows the contours of the land, making it hillier and more winding than a typical rail-trail. As you make your way along its route, try to imagine the open-air trolley cars bringing holidaymakers from Waterbury to Middlebury's Lake Quassapaug resorts. Unlike rail lines with a single stop in town, this state-of-the-art trolley line brought riders to the very doorstep of local homes and businesses.

    If you're taking the trail out and back, travel east to west for an easier downhill return. Parking on the east end is also more convenient. The initial stretch is an in-town trail passing local businesses. You're likely to see people running errands on foot and by bicycle. Farther west you'll come upon two small, nicely landscaped parks. Pause on a bench to catch your breath or meet a friend.

    Alternating a course between woods and residential areas, the trail continues 2 miles to Meadowview Park, a community park with sports fields, picnic tables, a water fountain and public restrooms. Approaching the trail's west end, you'll overlook spring-fed Lake Quassapaug and its sandy beach, and pass Quassy Amusement Park, an early destination for the trolley. The trolley closed in the 1930s when visitors began driving their cars to the resort, but the park remains popular and is known for large clam bakes and family fun. Its carousel and roller rink predate World War II.

    The trail ends at an access road leading to a
  • Mosholu-Pelham Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 10.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Mosholu-Pelham Greenway connects several parks and recreational opportunities in New York City's north and central Bronx neighborhoods. A portion of the trail is also part of the growing East Coast Greenway, which will span 15 states from Florida to Maine.

    On the trail’s east end is Pelham Bay Park along Long Island Sound. Larger than Central Park, this outdoor gem offers hiking and equestrian trails, playgrounds, two golf courses, access to City Island and Orchard Beach, and many other amenities.

    As it makes its way across town, the trail follows scenic Pelham Parkway and, later, Mosholu Parkway to head northwest. It ends in Van Cortlandt Park, which is centered around a large lake. The park offers a golf course, athletic fields, playgrounds, a riding stable, museum, and nature center. You can enjoy more of the park’s beautiful scenery by following a short pathway around the south side of the lake and connecting to the Old Putnam Trail. That trail in turn connects to the South County Trailway outside of the park, heading north for nearly 15 miles.

  • Naugatuck River Greenway (Beacon Falls)

    State: CT
    Length: 0.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Naugatuck River Greenway segment in Beacon Falls offers a short, but scenic route along the river that is paved and well-lighted. Just north of the trail's end at the Depot Street Bridge, lies Volunteer Park, a pleasant place to stop and take in the views. The trail will one day continue 4.3 miles through the town, including a section in the Naugatuck State Forest. The entire greenway is proposed to span more than 40 miles from Torrington to Derby in western Connecticut.
  • North County Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 22.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The North County Trailway is the longest of the four connected rail-trails breathing new life into the former New York Central Railroad's Putnam Division line. The "Old Put" provided passenger and freight service between New York City and Brewster, in Putnam County, from the 1880s. Passenger service ended in 1958 and freight services ended in 1980.

    The trail spans 22.1 miles in Westchester County. From Mount Pleasant (where it becomes the South County Trailway on its southward trek to the New York City line) the trailway extends north to the Putnam County border, where it seamlessly transitions into the Putnam Trailway, rolling 9.7 miles north. From Old Saw Mill River Road at the North County Trailway's southern end, the trail runs parallel to the busy Saw Mill River Parkway on the right and woodlands and a power transmission corridor on the left.

    After crossing over Old Saw Mill River Road, there is a side trail on the left that leads down to a parking lot along the road. The trail then crosses State Route 117, Bedford Road, on a bridge. Highway traffic is never far away from this southern section of the trail, but a narrow strip of trees provides welcome shade and screening from the traffic.

    Just beyond Pleasantville Road is a side trail to the Tudor-style Briarcliff Library, formerly the Briarcliff Manor train station. Then you hit the first of two on-road detours: Saw Mill River Road, which parallels the trail corridor here, provides a wide shoulder for the short distance to Chappaqua Road, when the rail-trail returns and runs you through the woods between Saw Mill River Road and the Taconic State Parkway.

    Your second journey on the shoulder of Saw Mill River Road begins at the intersection of North State Road. This 0.75-mile detour takes you past Echo Lake State Park and over the Taconic State P
  • Norwalk River Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 4.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    When completed, the Norwalk River Vally Trail will run from Long Island Sound to Danbury, about 27 miles. To date, disjointed sections are complete in Norwalk and Wilton.

  • Ocean Parkway Coastal Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 3.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Ocean Parkway Coastal Greenway, which opened in June 2014, runs just shy of 4 miles between Jones Beach State Park and Tobay Beach. Both beaches permit swimming and provide opportunities to purchase food and refreshments.

    The paved trail parallels the north side of Ocean Parkway (a guiderail and wide median separates users from traffic) and offers views of South Oyster Bay and the Atlantic Ocean along Long Island’s southern shore.

    From the trail’s western end, you can extend your journey on the Jones Beach Bikeway, which heads north to Cedar Creek Park.

  • Old Croton Aqueduct Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 26.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Dirt

    The Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park follows the route of the Old Croton Aqueduct, which carried water to New York City from 1842 to 1955. Most of the structure lies beneath the trail and has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The aqueduct itself remains intact; the northern sections continue to supply water to Ossining.

    The trail offers an enjoyable, level, 26 miles from the New Croton Dam in northern Westchester to Van Cortlandt Park at the New York City line. While primarily a walking path, parts of the trail are suitable for horseback riding, biking and, in winter, cross-country skiing. Panoramas of the Hudson River are visible, particularly in Yonkers and Hastings.

    Many historic homes, two nature preserves and a museum in Ossining highlighting the construction of the Aqueduct are immediate neighbors. The trail passes through 11 communities, offering and is accessible uphill from Metro-North Hudson Line trains and bus services along Route 9. Cyclists should avoid the trail after heavy rains and during the mud season to reduce erosion.

  • Old Erie Path

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    These three contiguous trails—the Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail, Old Erie Path and Joseph B. Clark Trail—occupy the former right-of-way of the Erie Railroad's Nyack and Piermont Branch. Each trail is fairly short but taken together they make for a wonderful experience along the banks of the Hudson River.

    The 3-mile Old Erie Path has a rougher surface than its neighboring Esposito Trail, but is suitable for walking and for hybrid or mountain biking. In contrast to the prior mile along roads and homes, this path is more remote. The railroad bed was cut into the side of steep hills that drop into the Hudson River, so trail users have a spectacular view across the wide river. Homeowners, many of them high above or downhill from the corridor, access the trail by way of creative engineering: hillside stairways with handrails fashioned from the limbs of native trees, as well as decorative archways and gates on intricate pulley systems.

    In Piermont the trail curves west away from the river. Just before the trail crosses Hudson Terrace, you'll find the restored Piermont train station, which houses information on the area's railroad history. Then the Old Erie Path begins a 1-mile long, densely wooded, gentle descent into the town of Sparkill, where it meets the 2.8-mile Joseph B. Clark Trail.

  • Old Mine Railroad Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    Fahnestock State Park is a relatively undiscovered gems in the New York State Park System. Located a few miles east of Cold Spring Village on Rt. 301 (Main Street), the park jurisdiction was recently expanded to include almost 10,000 acres of undeveloped land with an extensive network of trails maintained by the state and the New York-New Jersey trail conference.

    Ridges running from southwest to northeast dominate the terrain. Between them are several lakes and ponds and numerous wetlands and streams. Although there are occasional steep sections, there are no long or difficult climbs, and for the most part grades are moderate.

    The network of trails in the park makes it possible to plan a great variety of outings, ranging from easy rambles for families with children to strenuous all day hikes. Pick up a box lunch and enjoy the back country experience less than 60 miles from one of the largest cities in the world. Just remember to pack out what you pack in so others may enjoy the unblemished scenery.

    Trails are blazed with round plastic discs of various colors or rectangular painted marks. A double blaze, one above the other, indicates a turn with the upper blaze offset in the direction of the turn. A triple blaze in a triangle pattern indicates the start or end of a trail.

    The trails are restricted to day use only. Camping or making fires is not permitted. No vehicles are permitted on any hiking trails. This includes mountain bikes as well as all terrain vehicles (ATVs), motorcycles and snowmobiles.

    NOTE: The part of the Old Mine Railroad Trail from the Appalachian Trail to the dam at Hidden Lake is now closed. The trail has been rerouted from the 3 Lakes Trail over the dam to connect with the remaining part of the trail. The dam at Hidden Lake will be repaired and raise the water level, possibly
    covering the now closed section.
  • Old Putnam Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.25 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Dirt, Grass

    Splayed over 1,146 acres in northwest Bronx, Van Cortlandt Park has a lot going on. The park is New York City's fourth largest and is home to the oldest municipal golf course in America. There are playgrounds, walking trails, running tracks, scores of ball fields, a nature center, a museum and scenic lake. Van Cortlandt Park also is home to the Old Putnam Trail, one of four rail-trails on the former New York Central Railroad's Putnam Division line. The wide dirt and grass corridor allows easy passage on foot or by mountain bike.

    Access the trail from the northwest corner of the large parking lot near the Van Cortlandt Golf House. Though a portion of rail corridor extends south from here, it is heavily overgrown. Head south from the entrance a short distance to see the remnants of an old passenger platform. All that remains is the rusted metal framework.

    The trail's best scenery and its most unusual sight are immediate. The trail skirts Van Cortlandt Lake and then passes 13 large stones along the west side of the corridor. Railroad baron Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt had these stone slabs shipped from quarries to determine which would be best (most impervious to weathering) for building Grand Central Station in New York City. Despite the results of his experiment, Indiana limestone was chosen because it was cheaper to transport. The Indiana limestone sample is the second southernmost stone in this lineup.

    As you continue north you pass several trails that connect to the John Kiernan Nature Trail. This 1.25-mile trail named for a Bronx naturalist meanders by Van Cortlandt Lake, a wetland and the forest. Staying on the Old Putnam Trail brings you over a small bridge spanning an arm of Van Cortlandt Lake. Across the lake are views of the Bronx skyline and the golf course clubhouse.

    At the Westchester County line, the Old Putnam Trail gives way to the South County Trailway<
  • Putnam Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The final passenger cars of the Putnam Division of the New York Central Railroad ran in 1958, but the rail line that so influenced development of this area still sparks nostalgia. The "Old Put" carried commuters from New York City north to Brewster, where connections took travelers to Boston and Montreal. Freight service for farm products from rural areas of Putnam and Westchester counties continued until the 1980s.

    Nearly 45 miles of the Old Put corridor, from Van Cortlandt Park in New York City north to Putnam County, have been converted into four connecting rail-trails. The Putnam Trailway is the northernmost of the trails atop the train line. Currently 11 miles are open for public use from the Putnam County line at Baldwin Place, where Westchester County's North County Trailway terminates, to Putnam Avenue in Brewster.

    North from Baldwin Place is a gentle uphill slope. Busy Route 6 is just to the west, and a residential development flanks the east side of the trail. As you briefly enter a wooded area, Bloomer Pond appears on your right. Bucks Hollow Road runs adjacent to the trail here, providing several access points. The hamlet of Mahopac provides additional opportunities to access the trail.

    Past Croton Falls Road the trail enters a mixed hardwood forest for the 1.7 miles to Lake Casse. The woods are busy with squirrels and chipmunks foraging for food and shelter. Many bird species live in these woods; their calls can be heard throughout the day.

    To take in the view at Lake Casse, hop off the trail at Lake Road. After Lake Casse, the rail-trail descends and plunges into a dense forest. On the outskirts of the hamlet of Carmel, the trail runs along Route 6 again with the south bank of Lake Gleneida on the far side of the road. Swimming is prohibited because the lake is a municipal water supply. But in winter warmly dressed anglers cluster around their ice-fis
  • Quarry Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.1 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Grass

    The Quarry Trail is currently a 600-foot long unimproved strip of land along what is known as Quarry Road in the Village of Hastings-on-Hudson, NY. The trail links Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park and Hastings-on-Hudson trails. Access it from Aqueduct Lane between Hogan Place and Division Street.

  • PROJECT: Ramapo River Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.88 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This project will convert an abandoned railroad spur from the New York State/New Jersey line to an existing bike/pedestrian trail along the Ramapo River as part of a larger trailway system.

    The trail corridor is located in the western end of Rockland County at the base of the Ramapo Mountains. The trail will extend approximately two miles, beginning in the Village of Hillburn at the NY-NJ border, passing through the Village of Suffern and ending at Route 59 two miles north back in the Village of Hillburn.

    The proposed trail will be ten-feet wide and have an asphalt surface with 2-foot shoulders on each side. It will be ADA accessible for wheelchair users and will accommodate bicycles, pedestrians, joggers, in-line skaters, nature study and hikers.

    Key spots along the river would be cleared in order to improve accessibility to the river for anglers and canoeists and provide sitting areas for trail users to view attractive sections of the river, dams and historical sites.

    The trail would provide access to the Villages of Suffern and Hillburn. In Suffern, trail users could patronize the various shops and restaurants in the village, which could help increase economic activity and create new trail-related businesses.

    Improvement of the trail will open attractive vistas of the Ramapo River with its abundance of aquatic wildlife, birds and fauna. A treasured view that can be seen from various parts of the future trail's corridor is the Torne Valley, including the majestic Torne Mountain, which is surrounded by 1,500+ acres of rolling hills (the Ramapo Mountains) and is surrounded by Harriman State Park on three sides. The entire corridor runs along the Ramapo Mountains and many scenic areas exist along the way.

    CURRENT PROJECT STATUS: Funding has been approved and received; however, negotiations with propery owners for trail easements are still in progress. Construction is expected to begin in the Fall of 2002.
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  • Raymond G. Esposito Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    These three contiguous trails—the Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail, Old Erie Path and Joseph B. Clark Trail—occupy the former right-of-way of the Erie Railroad's Nyack and Piermont Branch. Each trail is fairly short but taken together they make for a wonderful experience along the banks of the Hudson River.

    The Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail in South Nyack, named for a late mayor of this village, is a 1-mile-long, gravel trail through several neighborhoods on the Hudson River. From its start in a community park, the rail-trail heads south, occasionally high above some of the neighborhoods it passes. Extensive stairways on the steep slopes have been constructed to connect residents with the rail-trail.

    The trail runs parallel to South Franklin Street crossing Brookside and Clinton avenues. These are low-traffic-volume residential roads, but trail users should stop at each intersection before proceeding. The trail crosses over the New York State Thruway on the original railroad bridge, redecked for trail use. By the time you touch down on the far side of the highway, at South Broadway Avenue, the Esposito Trail ends and the Old Erie Path begins.

  • Ridgefield Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    The Ridgefield Rail-Trail meanders for nearly 2.5 miles through the forested exburbs of Ridgefield, Connecticut. The trail passes among suburban acreages, along a creek at one point, and past a couple of the town's parks and open spaces, including Florida Refuge. The journey will be slightly downhill as you travel from Prospect Street to Florida Road. The trail was built by Connecticut Light & Power.

  • Samuel G. Fisher Mount Ivy Environmental Park

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Woodchips

    A former right-of-way of the NY & NJ Railroad.

    Near historical Mount Ivy which was the center of a Quaker settlement in the 18th century.

    Hiking along railroad bed and wildlife observation and wetland ecology.
  • Shoreline Greenway Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    When complete, Connecticut's Shoreline Greenway Trail will be a scenic 25-mile route through four quaint New England towns off Long Island Sound. From Lighthouse Point to Hammonasset Beach State Park, the trail will connect parks, schools, town centers, train stations, and hiking trails in East Haven, Branford, Guilford, and Madison.

    Along the way, views of the water, forests, meadows, and marshes can be enjoyed. Where possible, the trail will be surfaced with distinctive crushed pink granite from a local quarry in Stony Creek. Benches are currently available on the trail and interpretive signage on the area's unique history and geology, as well as birdwatching stations, are planned for the future.

    Although many parts of the trail have been cleared for walking and see regular use, the trail is surfaced and fully completed in these sections:

    East Haven

    0.2: This section, suitable for walking and biking, winds through a heavily wooded area from Hoop Pole Lane and Mansfield Grove Road to D.C. Moore School.

    Branford (two sections)

    0.8 mile: Known locally as the Branford Trolley Trail, this section stretches between the communities of Stony Creek and Pine Orchard along a former trolley line, offering pleasant views of the harbor.

    0.3 mile: This short, but scenic stretch from Birch Road to Pine Orchard Road goes through woodlands and past community gardens.

    Madison

    1 mile: This section leads trail-goers through a section of Hammonasset Beach State Park with views of woodlands, marshes, and a tidal stream.

  • South County Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 14.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The South County Trailway is a zippy paved trail heading north from Yonkers through the Hudson River Valley communities of Hastings-on-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Ardsley, Irvington, Greenburgh, and Elmsford. Popular with bike commuters seeking relief from the area's busy streets and parkways, the trail follows the former Putnam Division line ("Old Put") of the New York Central Railroad and links two other rail-trails on the same line: the Old Putnam Trail in the south and the North County Trailway in Mount Pleasant.

    The trail begins at the border of Westchester County and New York City, just outside Van Cortlandt Park. However, there is no trail access at this location. You must approach either from the Old Putnam Trail out of Van Cortlandt Park or by proceeding south from Redmond Park.

    North from HF Redmond Jr. Memorial Park, a new section of trail was completed in October 2011. Carry on slightly uphill from the park entrance to the intersection at Mile Square Road then cross the Palmer Road bridge. Just north of that is an observation point that offers views of north Yonkers.

    The next 7.5 miles are smooth sailing; the trail passes through mixed residential and commercial areas and parallels the Saw Mill River Parkway. Through V. Everit Macy Park the trail runs between the parkway and the New York Thruway. Though the majority is bordered by a fencerow of deciduous trees and brush, you are seldom far from traffic noise. The numerous side road crossings are well signed, but be alert at all crossings both for motorists and cyclists.

    The official endpoint of the South County Trailway, and the start of the 22-mile North County Trailway, is where the corridor crosses Old Saw Mill River Road. If you want to extend, or even double, your mileage, cross the road and make tracks on the line where the Old Put ra

  • Stratton Brook State Park Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 1.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Crushed Stone

    The Stratton Brook State Park Trail presents a great way to work up an appetite for a picnic at Stratton Brook State Park, the first state park in Connecticut to be entirely wheelchair accessible. The park also offers picnic areas, as well as fishing and swimming on its lake, created by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression when it dammed the brook. A covered bridge accesses the trail midpoint.

    From the covered bridge, the shaded rail-trail shoots northeast by southwest along the right-of-way of the former Connecticut Western Railroad. Head northeast to take in 1 mile of dense evergreen forest fragrant with pine and hemlock. Ferns carpet the forest floor, and the tree canopy creates a tunnel effect—especially beautiful in winter. After bridging Stratton Brook and rounding a gentle bend, the trail exits the park, ending at the Bushy Hill Road/State Route 309 intersection. Here, it connects to the short northern segment of the 8-mile Farmington River Trail.

    The Stratton Brook State Park Trail links the Farmington River Trail with the much longer Farmington Canal Heritage Trail. You can also access the canal trail by turning right on State Route 309 and following the shoulder 0.5 mile.

    For another option, turn southwest from the covered bridge and cross Stratton Brook Road. From there, the old railroad grade is a paved, but seldom used, road for 1.7 miles, where it enters Massacoe State Forest. Crews once used this corridor to demonstrate fire-control techniques along rail lines.

  • Sue Grossman Still River Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: CT
    Length: 2.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Sue Grossman Still River Greenway runs for nearly 3 miles through a wooded corridor between Lanson Drive and Harris Drive in Torrington. The paved trail occupies the old right-of-way for the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad's Naugatuck division.

  • Tallman Mountain State Park Bike Path

    State: NY
    Length: 2.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Dirt

    Tallman Mountain State Park Bike Path is partially paved and bisects the Tallman Mountain State Park. The route provides a motor-vehicle-free way for bicyclists using US Route 9W to connect with downtown Piermont, New York. The park itself is heavily wooded on the easterly slope of the Palisades uplands and overlooks Hudson and Piermont Marsh (between the river and the slope).

  • Timp-Torne Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 6.5 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    Just an hour north of New York City, the Timp-Torne Trail offers a scenic hike through Bear Mountain and Harriman State Parks with panoramic vistas of the Hudson River. The rugged blue-blazed trail travels along Dunderberg Mountain, The Timp summit, West Mountain and the steep rockface of Popolopen Torne. The trail is mostly wooded, so look for deer and other wildlife. Along the way, you'll also enjoy a mix of modern views (the Manhattan skyline) and historic sites: two tunnels and several rail beds from the Dunderberg Spiral Railway, which started construction in 1890, but was never completed.
  • Walkway Over The Hudson

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.28 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    Built in 1888 to link New York and New England to the coal beds of Pennsylvania and the West, the steel-truss Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge was the longest bridge in the world for a spell, stretching 6,768 feet (approximately 1.28 miles) over the Hudson River. A 1974 blaze, blamed on sparks from a passing train, damaged only 700 feet of the span's wooden decking. Repair, however, was too pricey for the bankrupt railroad company that owned the structure, and tearing it down would have been far more expensive. Instead they permanently halted railroad operations over it.

    Today the bridge is the Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park. The bridge deck is 212 feet above the Hudson River and provides spectacular views both upstream and down. Expanding 24 feet over land to 35 feet over the water, the deck used to fit a pair of railroad tracks. Now it sees a steady flow of walkers, joggers, skaters and bicyclists who drink in this new view, which opened to the public in late 2009.

    It will one day be a linchpin in a 27-mile corridor of rail-trails and riverfront parks already built or planned in Ulster and Dutchess counties. The Hudson Valley Rail Trail's final mile in Highland connects to the bridge's east end. In Poughkeepsie, the Dutchess Rail Trail connects to the bridge at Parker Avenue and extends southeast for 13 miles.

    The Walkway Over the Hudson started with a group of like-minded locals. In 1992 they formed an advocacy organization devoted to converting the bridge into a public walkway. About 15 years later, they had funding in place and the state was on board to manage and maintain the park. Construction was a considerable undertaking. The entire structure, including underwater piers, had to be assessed for stability. Existing railroad structures, suc

  • William R. Steinhaus Dutchess County Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 13 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Dutchess Rail Trail is a local treasure in the Hudson Valley region of New York, and for good reason: the 13-mile trail runs through what seems like a perpetually green landscape of dense tree cover, linking Poughkeepsie at the Hudson River with smaller towns to its southeast. The entire length of the trail, including the filling in of two significant gaps, was completed in October 2013. Now, a massive bridge—entirely funded by the New York Department of Transportation—spans busy State Route 55, Old Manchester Road and Wappinger Creek in the town of LaGrange.

    In the north, the Dutchess Rail Trail begins at a shared parking lot with the Walkway Over The Hudson off Parker Avenue/State Route 9G in Poughkeepsie. The stunning converted railroad trestle takes trail users over the Hudson River and leads directly to the Hudson Valley Rail Trail in Ulster County. All told, a trip on the three trails is a combined 18 miles one-way.

    Traveling east from Poughkeepsie utilizes a newer section of the Dutchess Rail Trail, completed in September 2013. This portion passes a large golf course and Morgan Lake Park. The park was the former western terminus of the trail and is a popular spot for fishing. After Morgan Lake, the trail begins to turn south, running through the communities of Arlington and LaGrange, and skirting the eastern edge of Red Oak Mills. This section includes the colossal bridge over SR 55, but the entire length of the trail features a mixture of new bridges and converted railroad trestles and tunnels.

    After winding through the towns of Wappinger and East Fishkill, the trail ends in the southeast just past the restored Hopewell Depot in Hopewell Junction. The museum that now occupies the former train station is well worth a visit, with a small photo gallery and plenty of inform