• Aliso Creek Riding and Hiking Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 18.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Aliso Creek Riding and Hiking Trail passes through the heart of Mission Viejo from South Laguna to Rancho Santa Margarita along an 18.5-mile corridor. The paved trail features many parks in Orange County, with plenty of rest areas and kiosks providing information and recounting the area's history. Beginning from the ocean end, the trail goes gradually uphill; it's a fun downhill ride on the way back.

  • Alton Ave to Orange Street Bike Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Running alongside an active railroad line, this trail primarily serves the recreational needs of local residents and commuters.

    DIFFICULTY:
    Easy

    FOOD:
    There are no restaurants, grocery stores, or picnic sites along the trail. There are, however, abundant gastronomic outlets in other areas of Santa Ana and neighboring areas.

    REST ROOMS:
    There are no rest rooms located at either trailhead or along the trail.

    TRANSPORTATION:
    For transit information, call the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) at (714) 636-RIDE (7433), or write OCTA, 550 South Main Street, P.O. Box 14184, Orange, CA 92868-1584

    RENTALS:
    There are no rentals available along the trail.
  • Arroyo Seco Bike Path

    State: CA
    Length: 2.4 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The Arroyo Seco Bike Path runs about 2 miles between South Pasadena and northeast Los Angeles, offering views of the LA skyline and the distant mountains. It begins on the north side of Pasadena Avenue and travels a short distance west to meet its namesake stream, which it follows southwest the rest of the way.

    Although the trail parallels the Arroyo Seco Parkway (State Route 110), the traffic noise is hardly noticeable. The pathway travels under the cover of tall sycamore and oak trees and offers access to Hermon Park (also known as Arroyo Seco Park) and the Ernest E. Debs Regional Park. South of E. Pullman Street, you can also take a pedestrian bridge over the Arroyo Seco to reach Sycamore Grove Park.

    Your journey will end at the Montecito Heights Recreation Center. This is less than a third of a mile from the must-see Heritage Square Museum (3800 Homer Street), which interprets 100 years of Southern California history—from 1850 to 1950—through a series of preserved Victorian-era homes.

    One day it's hoped the path will continue farther south to connect with the Los Angeles River Trail.

  • Bellflower Bike Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Bellflower Pedestrian and Bicycle Trail (signed: Bellflower Bike Trail) is a new 2.3 mile blacktop multipurpose rail trail, which was dedicated in November 2009. It follows the Right of Way of the old Pacific Electric Railway (the Red Cars) across Bellflower. At its zenith in 1925, the PER had over a thousand miles of interurban track in Southern California. The old rails are still there along the trail in many places.

    The trail begins at the Ruth R. Caruthers Park and Bellflower Skate Park on the banks of the San Gabriel River. It ends on Lakewood Blvd. at Paseo St. at the border of the City of Paramount. The Right of Way continues across Paramount to be lost at the 105 Freeway on the far side of the L. A. River. The other end continues 16 miles beyond Caruthers Park to end in Santa Ana. Across the river and accessible via a bridge at the park is the 38 mile long San Gabriel River Trail.

    The trail has two five foot striped bike lanes and a four foot pedestrian lane. These are separated by a small strip of decomposed granite. The street crossings are on-grade cross at the light crossings. Streets in the area are busy so make sure to cross at the controlled intersections. The trail is well signed and well lighted with attractive street lights the length of the trail. The Depot on Bellflower Blvd. is a must see period piece with restrooms in the baggage shed. There is free parking in the adjacent city lot (2 hour limit).

  • Bud Turner Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1.84 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Woodchips

    Experience the easy life of the West Coast on Orange County's Bud Turner Trail. Set in a quiet neighborhood in the city of Fullerton, the trail is ideal for all types of trail use and uniquely caters to equestrian use. The trail connects to the Juanita Cooke Greenbelt, which provides access to other parts of the city. Through his leadership role with the Fullerton Recreational Riders, a local equestrian organization, Bud Turner was influential in getting this trail built and that is why this great trail is named after him. The Juanita Cooke Greenbelt also bears the name of a former leader of the Fullerton Recreational Riders.

    Beginning at the north end of Laguna Lake Park, the trail skirts the southern edge of the lake to head southwest. This peaceful, grassy, lakefront park is a great place to have a picnic or try out your fishing pole. It's also where the Bud Turner Trail and the Juanita Cooke Greenbelt connect. Just beyond the lake you come to an equestrian riding ring—don't be surprised to catch a glimpse of locals on horseback; this is a popular equestrian area. After passing the ring you go through a pleasant neighborhood before connecting with North Euclid Street. The trail runs alongside this busy road the rest of the way. Take caution: you will need to cross some major intersections, including one at West Bastanchury Road.

    The trail ends near downtown Fullerton, close to the intersection of North Euclid Street and West Valencia Mesa Drive. From here you can connect to the historic downtown district, which has restaurants and shops in a laid-back Southern California setting.

  • Castaways Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This little trail has expansive views of the mountains, ocean, Upper Newport Bay and the Newport Harbor. Much of the 1-mile path runs along the bluffs in Castaways Park and the trail offers several overlooks to take in the scenery. Both tails of the trail end at Dover Drive, so travelers can make a loop by continuing along this roadway. To extend the trip, trail-goers can connect to the Back Bay Loop, a mixture of Class I trails and Class II bike lanes that circle the Upper Newport Bay and connect to the trail system in Irvine.
  • PROJECT: Coastal Rail-Trail (Oceanside to downtown San Diego)

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 44 miles
    Surface:

    The San Diego Coastal Rail-Trail project consists of a trail built alongside the active North County Transit District right-of-way from San Diego to Oceanside. Most of the northern section of the trail is within a block or two of the coastline, and only goes inland at Torrey Pines State Beach through Mission Bay. Each city along the right of way has assumed responsibility for construction and maintenance of their respective section of the trail.

    The 17-mile segment from Oceanside to Solana Beach will be the first to open. There are completed segments in Solana Beach, Carlsbad, and Oceanside. The project is strongly supported by the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), all the cities along the corridor, the North County Transit District Board, and is included in the Regional Transportation Plan, and all the Bicycle Transportation Plans of the cities along the route. The plan has won accolades from the American Planning Association and received an orchid at the annual Onions and Orchids city planning awards in San Diego.

    When the trail is completed, it will provide enhanced public access to Carlsbad, South Carlsbad, Leucadia, Moonlight, San Elijo, Cardiff, and Torrey Pines State Beaches, as well as Mission Bay Park, San Dieguito River Parkway, Marian Beare Park, and the Mission Bay Aquatic Area. It would also preserve natural areas adjacent to the San Dieguito River Parkway. The trail will benefit the low income community residing in South Oceanside, and provide easy public access from these areas to many open space areas and state beaches.

    The Oceanside to Solana Beach segment of trail is still partially unfunded and requires an additional $2 million in capital construction funds. The City of San Diego is still in search of additional funding for their segment as well. In addition, funding for amenities such as landscaping and interpretive exhibits is uncertain at this point.

    The City of Carlsbad is moving forw
  • Colton Rail-trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1.9 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    This urban trail travels along the side of North Colton Avenue and South Inland Center Drive, connecting San Bernadino and Colton. The corridor is an abandoned Southern Pacific rail line and will eventually help residents access the Santa Ana River Trail and perhaps the Pacific Electric Inland Empire Trail. The trail becomes a sidewalk near the I-215 overpass, so cyclists may need to walk their bikes or use Inland Center Drive to connect both segments of trail.

  • Compton Creek Bike Path

    State: CA
    Length: 5.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt

    The Compton Creek Bike Path crosses the city of Compton along the east bank of Compton Creek, providing precious open space access to the urban neighborhoods along the way. Compton Creek itself is a tributary to the Los Angeles River and is channelized to provide flood control protection to the area. The first 3.3 miles of the Bike Path is a paved trail extending from El Segundo Boulevard south through the residential neighborhoods of Compton to Greenleaf Blvd. This segment provides access to schools, the civic center, churches, and the Metro light rail line station. It has great potential for numerous greenway connections to schools and the development of pocket parks along the route. A Garden Park Master Plan has been created with the community taskforce to envision the length of the creek in this section filled with parks and open space amenities. An equestrian trail runs along the west bank of the creek and is used by several clubs and riders from adjacent neighborhoods.


    Another 2-mile section of paved trail exists further south along the creek, but is separated from the main trail by the light rail line, the Artesia Freeway, and the east fork of Compton Creek. Access to this southern segment is limited to a few large streets and the trail ends at the confluence of Compton Creek and the Los Angeles River. This section of the Creek channel has a natural bottom, so during parts of the year, the channel bottom is covered with vegetation, and path users can spot herons, egrets and other wildlife.

  • Coyote Creek Trail (Los Alamitos to La Mirada)

    State: CA
    Length: 9.75 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Coyote Creek Trail connects to the San Gabriel River Trail on the southern end, and follows the chanellized bank of the creek through residential and industrial neighborhoods with limited natural connections. A good transportation or commute option, it gives access to much of Orange County to bike to the ocean or other destinations in the area.
  • Dana Headlands Open Space Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Dirt

    Want an enjoyable loop hike with ocean views and three new parks plus a preserve? Check out the new parks while you hike the Dana Headlands Open Space Trail.

    Start at new Nature Interpretative Center atop the headlands and head out across the California Coastal Scrub and one of the last refuges of the Pacific Pocket Mouse. There are five overlooks along this section of the trail. It then climbs to Dana Strand Rd. and down the sidewalk to the South Strand Switchback Trail. A bit further on you catch the bike/ped trail to the Pacific Coast Highway and start the loop back.

    For a longer loop hike, go down the switchbacks and along the Strand Beach to the funicular on the north end. Your choices here are stairs or funicular to the top, then back along the edge of Strand Vista Park to the Veteran's Memorial Plaza. Here you take the bike/ped trail up to CA 1, then get on the trail through Hilltop Park. Take the side trail up to the highest overlook on the trail and one with 360 views. Then through the park, down to the Harbor Point Park (3 overlooks) and back up the sidewalk to the Center.
  • DeAnza Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 22 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel, Sand

    Jaun Batista DeAnza discovered as an inland route from Mexico to California's coast across the desert. The first non-native child born in California on the trail December 25th, 1775. Used by stagecoach, cattle ranchers, gold seekers, pioneers and others.
  • Duarte Bike Trail (Duarte Multipurpose Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Duarte Bike Trail (a.k.a. Duarte Multipurpose Path) is made up of paved and parallel dirt trails. Connecting a park, a school and a hospital, it is a wonderful example of a recreation path, transportation corridor and safe route to school. The trail hosts a wide array of users, including walkers, bikers, inline skaters and even some horseback riders on the dirt path.

    You'll want to start out at the eastern trailhead, at Royal Oaks Park, because there is ample parking here. The park offers many facilities for young and old, including basketball and tennis courts, short walking paths and playground equipment. On the right are dramatic views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Angeles National Forest. As it leaves Royal Oaks Park, the trail is a well-maintained concrete pathway. Soon you pass a school that sits back to the right, where children at play provide pleasant background noise. Not far beyond the school is one of the jewels of the trail, a large bridge that provides access over the trail to a connecting neighborhood.

    A profusion of wildflowers in spring spreads across this picturesque spot. If you take the few minutes to walk to the top of the bridge, you will be rewarded with an exceptional view of wildflowers and the trail. A few benches and water fountains line the trail. Located in Southern California's San Gabriel Valley, Duarte is named for Andres Duarte, a Mexican soldier who was granted the land in the 1840s while the area was still in Mexican ownership.

  • East Trabuco Creek Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The East Trabuco Creek Trail is a short blacktop bike and ped trail which starts down at Descanso Park, behind the San Juan Capistrano City Hall, at the confluence of San Juan Creek and Trabuco Creek. The trail heads upstream on the eastern bank, undercrosses the Trabuco Bridge on Del Obispo St., passes the new Los Rios Park and ends at a pocket park at the end of Avenida De La Vista, at the southern end of a 0.67 mile long stable district.

    From here, should you desire, a well-marked Class III bike route goes up to the Class II bike lanes on Camino Capistrano and thence northward to the city line.

    On the opposite bank is the West Trabuco Creek Trail. This is gravel and hard packed dirt and signed for horses, peds and bikes (suggest a mountain bike). It goes further up creek and joins several mountain bike/horse trails. Check it out.
  • Electric Avenue Median Park

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Concrete, Grass

    If you believe the setting makes the trail, you wouldn't quibble with the brevity of the Electric Avenue Meridian Park rail-trail. The path is ensconced in a beautifully maintained linear park and offers easy access to a spectacular Southern California beach.

    DIFFICULTY:
    Very easy

    FOOD:
    There is o food available along the trail, but Seal Beach boasts a number of restaurants, many of which are near the route. There are several picnic benches along the route.

    REST ROOMS:
    There are rest rooms in the Mary Wilson Branch of the Orange County Library, which is about 0.1 mile south of the trail's northern end point at Marina Drive.

    TRANSPORTATION:
    For transit information, call the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) at (714) 636-RIDE (7433), or write OCTA, 550 South Main Street, P.O. Box 14184, Orange, CA 92868-1584. Transportation information is also available by calling (800) COMMUTE in the Los Angeles calling area. The Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority Web site is www.met.net

    RENTALS:
    There are no rentals available along the trail.
  • PROJECT: Exposition Line

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 12.2 miles
    Surface:

    The Exposition corridor connects the Santa Monica coastline and Culver City in the West to Downtown LA and the University of Southern California on the East. The first phase is from Downtown to Culver City is now open, but this section is primarily on street facilities such as bike lanes. This is a key corridor since it is a rare opportunity for continuous access from South Central LA to the coast through a dense urban area. Formerly a Pacific Electric Line, it is now inactive and is owned by the LA Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Plans for a rail-to-trail conversion were nearing the final stages when the MTA decided to have transit share the corridor with the trail. The trail has strong support from the Los Angeles City Council, the LA County Board of Supervisors, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), and many community groups, including the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition and Friends for Expo. It is included in the Regional Transportation Plan, the LA Bikeway Master Plan, and the County General Plan. The trail would serve densely populated areas, including low income districts such as South Central Los Angeles, and will connect to the Beaches at Santa Monica, the Culver Blvd. Median trail, and Exposition Park.
  • Freeway Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    A freeway runs alongside it. High tension lines run over it. The San Diego Freeway is south of it. The neighborhoods with their sound walls are north of it. The eastern portion is stark and open. The western portion has its own sound wall and landscaping for a more scenic ride by far.

    Why ride it? For the connections.

    It is a 2.92 mile blacktop trail that connects to three north-south bike trails to San Diego Creek below Bill Barber Park, the Woodbridge Trail and the Jeffrey Open Space Trail. This gives you a lot of options in planning rides in south Irvine that are not Out & Backs.
  • Griffith Park

    State: CA
    Length: 53 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel

    Los Angeles' Griffith Park has more than 4,107 acres of preserved natural land for recreating, including hiking, biking, and horseback riding. The park is located in the eastern Santa Monica Mountain amid a landscape of semiarid chaparral foothills and forested valleys.

    In addition, the park offers swimming, golf, camping, picnicking, and tennis. There are 53 miles' worth of trails, fire roads, and bridle paths, and you can rent bikes here. Maps are available from the park visitor center. The park closes at dusk.

  • Hicks Canyon Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Gravel

    The Hicks Canyon Trail is a short but scenic 2.28 mile blacktop trail along the landscaped Hicks Canyon Wash. It starts at the Peters Canyon Wash Trail near Hicks Canyon Community Park and climbs up the wash to end on Portola Parkway just west of Jeffrey Rd. The portion above the park is a high speed trail with grade separated crossings. Below the park there is one on-grade crossing before you reach the high speed Peters Canyon Wash Trail.

    Runners and equestrians will both enjoy the parallel bridle trail which starts down at Peters Canyon @ Hicks Trail Junction and continues to the top of the trail. The bridle trail continues across Peters Canyon Wash on a bridge to become the West Irvine Trail on the far side.

    There are good trail-side amenities  Hicks Canyon Community Park in the lower end and Citrus Glen Neighborhood Park in the upper section, plus trail-side water and benches, shade trees and nice landscaping. In short, its short but pleasant  a nice ride which you can make into a longer loop if desired.
  • Jeffrey Open Space Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The Jeffrey Open Space Trail has won awards for its landscaping and innovative design of incorporating a series of intaglio panels in the concrete bed of the trail. The panels take you through a history of the Irvine Ranch, from the early days (Irvine Boulevard end) through the 20th century (Trabuco Road end).

    The concrete trail parallels Jeffrey Road among a suburban landscape of neighborhoods, shopping plazas and, as the name suggests, open space. At Bryan Avenue, it links with the Venta Spur Trail. There's a break in the trail (proposed trail planned for the future) between Trabuco Road and Barranca Parkway, then the another short segment picks up again from Barranca south to I-405. Here, you can cross over the freeway on a pedestrian bridge and link with the Shady Canyon Trail (also known as Quail Hill Trail) heading east.

  • Juanita Cooke Greenbelt

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Woodchips

    The Juanita Cooke Greenbelt is a wonderful escape from the often-busy streets and highways of Orange County. This 2.5-mile trail in Fullerton connects some of the area's quiet neighborhoods with the downtown area, making it a great commuter path as well. The wide mulch and dirt surface makes this trail ideal for equestrian, pedestrian and bike use, alike.

    The trail is named for the woman who once served as a liaison for the Fullerton Recreation Riders, a local equestrian group that helped get the trail built. A plaque posted at West Valley View Drive gives the history of the trail. Also posted at this location is the route of a 12-mile mountain bike ride around Fullerton. Yet another trail, the Bud Turner Trail, named for another Fullerton Recreation Riders leader influential in making a trail a reality, connects to the greenbelt. Together, these two trails provide a refreshing space for all trail enthusiasts.

    Setting out from the northern trailhead at Laguna Lake Park, you will pass through some established neighborhoods. (Although the trail's official north end is at Hermosa Drive near Laguna Lake, the path continues north until it is interrupted by the Coyote Creek channel. A rough informal path goes as far north as Imperial Highway, where the railroad spur still exists, and there is a signalized grade crossing.)

    The scents provided by the flowering shrubs, citrus trees and the rest of the surrounding lush vegetation is a delightful bonus. As the trail approaches bustling downtown Fullerton, it crosses high above an active railroad corridor. When you reach Laguna Road and the trail appears to come to an abrupt stop, cross the road and follow Morelia Place (directly across the street from the trail) for a few hundred yards of on-road travel. At the intersection of West Bastanchury Boulevard, cross this busy street and pick up the mulch and dirt trail once again on the other sid
  • LARIO Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 17 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The LARIO Trail extends along the southern reaches of the channelized LA River, providing a trail corridor through a variety of natural and industrial landscapes and connecting riders to the ocean in Long Beach. The vision for the trail network is to have a trail that extends the entire length of the LA River, connecting to the completed section near Griffith Park and up into the San Fernando Valley. The current trail follows the eastern bank from Long Beach north to a bike-pedestrian bridge just north of Rosencrans Ave in east Compton. There it crosses to the west bank and follows the LA River north to Atlantic Ave in Maywood. A conneccting trail on the eastern bank follows the Rio Hondo up to the Whittier narrows area.
  • Long Beach Greenbelt (Pacific Electric Right of Way)

    State: CA
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    The Long Beach Greenbelt is also known as the Pacific Electric Right-of-Way, a narrow strip of dirt trail running between N. Loma Avenue at E. 11th Street and Park Avenue at E. 4th Street. The 1-mile trail cuts a diagonal path through open space among neighborhoods and businesses.

  • Los Angeles River Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This 7-mile trail is part of the Los Angeles River Greenway. The Los Angeles River is 51 miles long, starting at the Western end of the San Fernando Valley and flowing into the Pacific Ocean in Long Beach. There are plans to build trails, parks and nature reserves along the banks of the river.
    Elysian Valley Gateway Park is found along this stretch of the river and provides access to the natural streambed portion of the river. This is a great spot for viewing the variety of birds that call this park home.
  • PROJECT: Los Angeles River Trail (Project segment)

    State: CA
    Length: 2.7 miles
    Surface:

    When completed, the Los Angeles River Trail will connect several disjointed trails, to complete a unified 52-mile corridor leading from the San Fernando Valley, south to the ocean. Looking to piece together the Orange Line (giving access to Chatsworth Metrolink after Orange Line Extension) and the LARIO trail in Long Beach, the LA River Trail will travel largely along the LA River and provide north-south access for many communities.

    Currently, a 2.7 mile trail between the intersection of I-5 and Highway 134, and I-5 and Fletcher has been completed. Further work is set to begin in the near future on Phase 3 of the LA River Trail, which will add another 2.7 miles of southern expansion to Highway 101.
  • Lower Sam Merrill Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2.7 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    The Lower Sam Merrill Trail (also referred to simply as the Sam Merrill Trail) is named for a man who was inspired by John Muir and committed to preservation. Merrill was on the National Board of Directors of the Sierra Club in the 1930s and lead numerous outings and hikes, including throughout the San Gabriel Mountains surrounding Altadena.

    Originating in the town of Altadena, the trail switchbacks its way up Las Flores Canyon to the top of Echo Mountain. The trail was first built in the 1930s but was washed away, along with many others, in the floods of 1938. Soon after, Sam Merrill spearheaded the rebuilding of the trail, which was then named after him upon his death in 1948.

    The Sam Merrill Trail follows a sometimes steep route for nearly 3 miles directly to Echo Mountain, where you'll find ruins from the Mount Lowe Railway. The Sam Merrill Trail ends on the ridge where it intersects the Mt. Lowe Railroad Trail.

  • Mt. Lowe Railroad Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 5.8 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

    The Mount Lowe Railway was created as a scenic tourist line to bring visitors to see Mount Lowe and Echo Mountain. The railway opened in 1893 and stopped services in 1938. Interestingly, the railway was the only scenic mountain electric traction (overhead electric trolley) railroad in the country. Another of its features was the remarkable incline up Rubio Canyon to the Echo Mountain House, and a circular bridge that was as an engineering landmark in itself.

    Today the Mount Lowe Railroad Trail offers access to the ruins at Echo Mountain and the Alpine Tavern (Mt. Lowe Camp), once frequented by LA tourists and subsequently destroyed by flooding and fire. Along the trial you'll find historical markers that relate the story of the rail line. The trail is quite sinuous as snakes through the Angeles National Forest, offing superb views of the mountain, canyons and surrounding pine forests.

  • Oceanfront Boardwalk

    State: CA
    Length: 2.9 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The Oceanfront Boardwalk begins in West Newport Beach at the end of 38th Street and runs nearly 3 miles down the Balboa Peninsula. Along the way, trail-goers will find restaurants, dory fishermen, upscale beachfront housing, and views of ocean and sand. Highlights of the trail include the historic Balboa Pier, constructed more than 100 years ago, and the Newport Pier, overlooking a beautiful beach. The popular trail is typically thronged with walkers and riders, so be prepared for a relaxing, slow-speed saunter through the scenery.
  • PROJECT: Orange Blossom Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 7.5 miles
    Surface:

    From Redlands Conservancy website:


    Pieces of the future Orange Blossom Rail Trail have been constructed along the flood control channel between Nevada and Tennessee, and along the flood control channel south of Jennie David Park between New York Street and Texas Street. The pieces of the trail were acquired as a result of conditions of approval for development in the area. Parking is best at Jennie Davis Park. It offers a level, improved place for a brisk power-walk, with potential hazards of crossing major streets (Tennessee and Alabama).

  • Pacific Electric Bicycle Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    A neighborhood trail of the first order, the Pacific Electric Bicycle Trail links well-kept middle-class neighborhoods on either side of tree-lined Maple Street.

    DIFFICULTY:
    Easy.

    FOOD:
    There are no restaurants or grocery stores along the trail, but such amenities are available elsewhere in Santa Ana. Verdant strips of grass and occasional benches offer trail users the chance to picnic.

    REST ROOMS:
    There are no rest rooms at either end point or along the trail.

    TRANSPORTATION:
    For transit information, call the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) at (714) 636-RIDE (7433), or write OCTA, 550 South Main Street, P.O. Box 14184, Orange, CA 92868-1584. Transportation service information can also be obtained by calling (800) COMMUTE from the Los Angeles calling area.

    RENTALS:
    There are no rental shops along the route.
  • Pacific Electric Inland Empire Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 18.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone

    The Pacific Electric Inland Empire Trail is a great commuter and recreation trail in western San Bernadino valley, with expansive views and connections to community centers and parks. The trail follows the old Pacific Electric Railway, which was known for its red cars. One of its last remaining railway depots along the San Bernardino line is found in Rancho Cucamonga on Etiwanda Avenue, where the avenue intersects the trail.

    The segment in Rancho Cucamonga includes a 10-foot-wide, concrete trail for bikes and the same width side path of decomposed granite for running, walking and horseback riding. The segment in Upland is asphalt, and is nicely landscaped, leading through residential neighborhoods and commercial corridors before connecting to Claremont. The attractive village offers shopping and the Claremont Colleges.

    Fontana recently completed several new concrete segments that connect to the trail in Rancho Cucamonga. There is a gap between Cherry Avenue and Almeria Avenue in Fontana where the corridor runs through an industrial area; a connection is planned in the future.

    When complete, the Pacific Electric Inland Empire Trail will run 21 miles east-west between Rialto and Claremont. The trail has possibilities for connecting to a massive network of pathways that include the Santa Ana River Trail and San Jose Creek connecting to the San Gabriel River Trail.

    Every May, Friends of the Pacific Electric Trail sponsor a fun event to raise money for trail amenities.

  • Palos Verdes Loop

    State: CA
    Length: 24 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Over half of the miles are along the Pacific Ocean. Great route to build both time in the saddle as well as a great cumulative verticle workout.
  • Peters Canyon Wash Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Peters Canyon Wash Trail is one segment of the Mountains to the Sea Trail - which runs 22 miles from Wier Canyon down to the Upper Newport Bay. It's a nice ride in its own right and even better when combined with the San Diego Creek Trail and the loop-back options.


    Starting across the street from Bill Barber Park in Irvine, CA, it heads northeast along a landscaped concrete bikeway running along Harvard Ave. to the Incredible Edible Park (which is the trail head for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Trail).


    From the park it jogs west along a drainage channel to join the Peters Canyon Wash. Now it follows the wash uphill on a blacktop bikeway with street undercrossings that take you down into the wash and back up again. The bikeway is landscaped and has extensive bollard lighting along the trail for night use.


    There are two side trails - the Venta Spur Trail and, higher up, the Hicks Canyon Trail. Both can be made into return loops with a bit of bike lane riding. The trail ends at Portola Parkway. Take to the bike lanes to go further inland.
  • Salt Creek Trail (CA)

    State: CA
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone

    The Salt Creek Trail is an approximately 12 ft wide multipurpose trail in both concrete and blacktop with a center stripe plus an equestrian trail in places. It has more arms than an octopus. There are two sections and several branches. This section, the seaward Salt Creek Trail - starts on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean at the Salt Creek Beach Park, Dana Pt., CA. and climbs up a coastal canyon, working inland to end at a trail underpass by the Dog Park on The Street of the Golden Lantern in Laguna Niguel, about 5.4 miles. The bulk of the trail is in Laguna Niguel.


    First it swings along the bluff below the Ritz Carlton with great ocean views, then inland along a golf course to dive under the Pacific Coast Highway and emerge on the far side. Now it starts climbing the west side of the Arroyo Salado with Salt Creek below. There are unfolding views of the ocean behind you and the canyon ahead and below. In addition to bikers, there is a good deal of foot traffic  joggers, walkers, dog walkers, pram pushers, etc. You will seldom be alone for long. Above Niguel Road it turns easterly into Chapparosa Park, then climbs along the ridge to end at the underpass on Golden Lantern.


    The trail has its ups and downs, but mostly up. This is typical of trails in Laguna Niguel. Enjoy climbing; you will get it. Of course, you also have glorious downhill coasting. You will go from 69 on the picnic plaza overlooking the ocean to 349 at Chapparosa Community Park, then climb more to the eastern trail end at the Dog Park parking lot on Golden Lantern (443). In between are lots of ups and down that all add up.
  • San Clemente Beach Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Sand

    Hugging one of the most picturesque shorelines in Southern California, the San Clemente Beach Trail is one of the premier rail-trails in the area. The trail itself is technically a rail-with-trail, as it shares the corridor with an active Amtrak line with service between Los Angeles and San Diego, as well as Metrolink trains that are part of the L.A. commuter rail system. Whereas most communities surrounding L.A. have fallen victim to rampant development, surfside San Clemente has preserved its small town identity and spirit. The trail enhances these qualities. The trail surface is composed mostly of compact sand from the beach.

    Begin at the north end of the pedestrian-only trail near the San Clemente Metrolink station in the area known as North Beach. The trail leads south out of the Metrolink parking lot. It is narrowly situated between high cliffs on the left and the railroad tracks and beach on the right. Be sure to check out the unique flora that cover the cliff, as well as the impressive beach houses high atop the cliffs. After several hundred yards, the trail flows onto an impressive bridge. Running about 10 feet off the ground for roughly 0.25 mile, the bridge serves as a glorified boardwalk over sensitive beach habitat.

    Once across the bridge, follow the trail across the railroad tracks and continue to the primary beachfront area of San Clemente at the Pier Bowl trailhead. Here you will find restaurants, shops and beach picnic areas. A pier jets out into the ocean here and is a prime location for watching surfers ride the waves. There are public restrooms and plenty of parking near the pier.

    The trail continues south along the beach and crosses the railroad tracks again about 0.25 mile beyond the Pier Bowl area. Be careful because the crossing is at grade with the tracks. The trail continues for another 1.5 miles south along the beach to the endpoint near San Clemente State Beach, which has parking and beach access.

  • San Diego Creek Bikeway

    State: CA
    Length: 12 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The San Diego Creek Bikeway is the spine of the City of Irvine's system of Class 1 bikeways and Class II bike lanes. It begins in Newport Beach and joins Back Bay Loop Trail where San Diego Creek empties into the Upper Newport Bay under the Jamboree Rd. bridge, then follows the creek upstream, crossing much of Irvine before it ends near the junction of the 405 and 133 Freeways.



    Many of the 44 miles of off-road paved Class I bikeways and 282 miles of Class II bike lanes touch or cross the San Diego Creek Bikeway at some point. This lets you put together all sorts of loop trips. Where do you want to go today? Head up the creek and see where it takes you.
  • PROJECT: San Diego Inland Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 22 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Inland Rail Trail is a rail-with-trail project connecting Escondido with Oceanside and the planned San Diego Coastal Trail that will connect to the City of San Diego. The plan is supported by both the North County Transit District and the Technical Advisory Committee (City of San Marcos, Vista, Escondido, Oceanside, County of San Diego and the North County Transit District). The project is included in many local and regional plans, including the Regional Transportation Plan and the San Diego Bikeways Master Plan. The commuter line is intended for 74 trains per day, with speeds up to 50 mph. The trail will be safely separated from the trains, and all grade crossings will be signalized. The trail will serve the transportation and recreation needs of a diverse population, including low income and minority residents of the cities along the corridor.
    The project is complete from Escondido to San Marcos, and additional segments to extend the trail into Oceanside are currently in the design phase.
  • PROJECT: San Diego Sea to Sea Trail (project overview)

    State: CA
    Length: 140 miles
    Surface:

    From San Diego Sea to Sea Trail Foundation:
    The San Diego Sea to Sea Trail Foundation, in conjunction with nine government agencies, is creating a national treasure: a 140-mile walking, cycling and horse riding trail, running from the Salton Sea to the Pacific Ocean near Del Mar, California.

    The San Diego Sea to Sea Trail Foundation's aims are to preserve the great American environment, encourage ecological tourism and build a recreational and educational resource to be enjoyed for generations to come.

    The Trail will be punctuated by numerous Bed & Breakfasts where hikers, bicyclists and horse riders can rest and dine in an elegant and rustic setting. The journey will combine the ideal mix of nature, adventure and well-deserved comfort.

    For more information on this extensive project and to learn how to volunteer to assist with this effort, please see the Trail Website. You can also e-mail the San Diego Sea to Sea Trail Foundation at kgreenaway@seatoseatrail.org.
    ** Twenty percent of the trail still needs to be finished. Right now one would encounter several impassable, steep ravines -- and State Highway 67, which is much too dangerous to cross. So think of the route we describe below as proposed". There is some crucial work to be done. **
  • PROJECT: San Fernando Road Metrolink Bike Path

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 12 miles
    Surface:

    Broken into three phases, this bike path is partially completed. The San Fernando Road Bike Path follows the Metrolink light rail tracks which are already in place. With a completed 1.75 mile section servicing the San Fernando Metrolink stop, this path has already received acclaim.

    Construction on a larger and more expensive segment of the trail began in mid-2010. This portion of the rail-with-trail extends southward for 2.75 miles between Metrolink stops, and involves upgrades to trail safety and overall appearance.

    The final phase consists of a 4.3 mile segment which extends further south toward West Hollywood. No timetable is available for the final leg of the San Fernando Road Bike Path.

    Numerous locations of human activity which would benefit from safe pedestrian and bicycle access exist adjacent to the tracks. These include Pierce College,(a Los Angeles City Community College) which has sports and arts facilities as well as being an important regional educational facility, and Warner Center, an small-industrial and business/commercial center which generates a lot of freeway and surface street traffic.
  • San Gabriel - Santa Ana River Connector Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 12.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    This popular trail runs along the coastline and acts as a connector between the San Gabriel River Trail and the Santa Ana River Trail. There are approximately 2.5 miles of on-road and bike-lane, mostly between Seal Beach and Sunset Beach. The remaining portion of the trail is along a paved path, mostly through Huntington Beach.
  • San Gabriel River Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 38 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The San Gabriel River Trail extends from the base of the San Gabriel Mountains all the way to the Pacific Ocean. A key component to LA's transportation infrastructure, the trail will eventually connect to the Rio Hondo and Whittier Greenway to form the backbone of a huge trail system for the region. The trail travels through a diverse landscape of industrialized and natural areas, including Santa Fe dam recreation area and the Whittier narrows. Parking and restrooms are available at the ranger station at the north end and beach access at the southern end.
  • San Juan Creek Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The San Juan Creek Trail starts on the beach where the creek meets the ocean at Doheny State Beach in Dana Point, CA. From there it runs on the levee along the western bank of the creek to the confluence of San Juan Creek and Trabuco Creek in San Juan Capistrano at Descanso Park. Here it meets the Trabuco Creek Trail. It then passes under the I-5 freeway. On the far side it pulls about 100 yards back from the creek and runs on bike/walks along streets, then into a greenbelt to end at Missions Trails Stables. The section north of I-5 features a lot stables between trail and creek.
  • San Luis Rey River Trail (Oceanside)

    State: CA
    Length: 7.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The San Luis Rey River Trail is 7.2 miles between Neptune Way on the west end and the College Bridge on the west end. The trail follows the course of the San Luis Rey River and is mostly flat. It's a local favorite among cyclists, walkers and inline skaters.

  • Santa Ana River Trail (Orange County)

    State: CA
    Length: 30 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Santa Ana River trail is a 12-foot wide path following the cement-lined Santa Ana River. The trail runs between SR 1/E. Pacific Coast Highway at Huntington Beach and SR 71/Corona Freeway just northwest of Corona. The popular trails links neighborhoods, business and shopping districts and the beach.

    There are plans to link the trail with its northern counterparts in San Bernardino and beyond, creating a 110-mile trail corridor all the way to Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino Mountains.

  • Santa Ana River Trail (San Bernardino)

    State: CA
    Length: 20 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Santa Ana River trail is a 12-foot wide path following the cement-lined Santa Ana River. The San Bernardino portion of the trail runs between Arlington Avenue, where Norco and Riverside meet, and Waterman Avenue in San Bernardino. The trail passes through Santa Ana River Regional Park.

    The popular trail links neighborhoods with business and shopping districts. Once it is linked with the Orange County section of the trail, it will also link with the Pacific Coast. In addition, plans for extending the trail all the way to Big Bear Lake in the San Bernardino Mountains, creating a 110-mile trail corridor.

  • Santiago Creek Bike Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone

    The Santiago Creek Bike Trail is a scenic urban ride up a portion of Santiago Creek from beneath I-5 northeast to Collins Avenue. From Collins Avenue, the trail heads south to parallel E. Prospect Avenue then picks up Bond Avenue to Hewes Street, north to Villa Park Road and east again to end just west of Cannon Street.

    There are numerous trees shading the trail, making it a pleasant and scenic Sunday ride. In addition, the Santiago Creek Bike Trail is joined by the Tustin Branch Trail – Wanda Road segment near E. Walnut Avenue.

  • Shady Canyon Trail Loop

    State: CA
    Length: 10 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    You have choices. You can ride the Shady Canyon Trail starting at Quail Hill Trailhead. In 4.05 miles you will reach the far end at an intersection and wonder "What next? You can ride the Shady Canyon Trail plus Loop and return to Quail Hill from the opposite direction in 9.5 miles.


    The Shady Canyon Trail plus Loop is a collage of four City of Irvine bikeways  the Bonita Canyon Trail, the Shady Canyon Trail, the Quail Hill Trail and much of the University Trail - that combine to form an almost seamless scenic 9.5 mile Class I loop ride through the hills of southern Irvine, east of the University of California  Irvine campus.


    The trail climbs and descents. The total ascent was 451, descent, 486, according to the GPS. The Shady Canyon Trail climbs enough to provide a number of interesting vistas of Orange County below. Depending which way you ride, you can enjoy either a thrilling descent from Gatehouse Pass to Quail Hill or a grinding climb up the same and a long, but not steep descent down the Shady Canyon Trail and around the loop to the San Diego Freeway, then back to Quail Hill. There are 0.37 miles of sidewalk or bike lane riding on Culver to patch a gap in the trails.

  • Southern Avenue Greenway

    State: CA
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    Open space is precious in South Gate, and this greenway that runs under the power lines provides an off street walking and biking route, as well as play areas for the community. There are numerous street crossings, so caution is needed at the intersections. Many of the crossings occur far from the corners and can be dangerous if bicyclists or drivers fail to watch for oncoming traffic. The greenway does not yet connect to the LA River Bikeway, but access would provide South Gate residents options for long distance commuting and recreational rides on trails.
  • The Shoreline Pedestrian Bikeway

    State: CA
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    View, views, views! Have we got views! On a scale of 5, we have 6-7 stars of views.

    Views across Long Beach Harbor, the cranes of the container port and Palos Verdes beyond. Views down the beach to the mouth of the San Gabriel River. Views of the oil islands and ships anchored in the outer harbor. Views of the homes and apartment towers along the shore and more. The SPB is probably the most scenic bikeway in Los Angeles or Orange County. The harbor area features lots of tourist attractions, so you can spend the whole day doing this or that and go broke in the process. Riding the trail is free.

    The Shoreline Pedestrian Bikeway is a scenic 4.62 mile multipurpose bikeway from the tip of the breakwater opposite Island Girssom at the Long Beach Shoreline Marina, down along the base of the marina, onto that long white sand beach, down the beach, past the Belmont Pier to end at E. Ocean Blvd x 54th Place in Belmont Shore. It is a 17 concrete path with a five foot pedestrian lane and two bike lanes with lots of parking (pay) and restrooms along the route. The City of Long Beach thinks its 3.1 miles long and doesnt include the marina breakwater. Right.

    Bikes are for exploring things. Anyone on a bike will ignore that and head right out to the tip of the breakwater to start their ride. They do and so did we. So does the bikeway. It runs right out to the tip of the breakwater. Pedal out, zero your log and start checking out the views on the way back.
  • PROJECT: Tracks at Brea

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Currently under construction, the Brea Rail-Trail project ultimately will run through a 3-mile corridor of newly acquired Union Pacific tracks in the city of Brea. The first phase of the construction will connect the Brea Canyon Channel bikeway and Arovista Park (currently under construction) to a long portion of abandoned UP tracks - home to future trail expansion.
    Further eastern expansion is expected as well, as Birch Hills Golf Course re-develops its orientation around the decommissioned railroad tracks which run through their property.
    It is expected that the trail will initially connect from Birch Hills Golf Course to Arovista Park with potential for southern extension along the Brea Canyon Channel.
    Long term goals include connecting through La Habra to a rail-with-trail project along the active UP line in Whittier and from there to the Whittier Greenway.
  • Turtle Rock Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The Turtle Rock Trail is a short (2.63 miles) but aerobic workout up and down a series of concrete bike/walks (11 wide bikeway and sidewalk combined) which climb through green belts up, over and down the eastern ridge of Turtle Rock. You enjoy a combination of huffing ascents and screaming descents. Your decision is  in what order? Climb out of William Mason Park or out of the Turtle Rock Community Park? Both ways climb toward the high point of the trail  where it meets Ridgeline Dr. above the Hairpin Switchback. If you start at Turtle Rock Park, you ascent 140, then descent 321 to Bobcat Junction. Ride over, but what a great descent!

    As one expects in Irvine, the trail has good landscaping and facilities. There are two trail-side water fountains and numerous benches set in alcoves along the trail. Instead of low bollard lights, the TRT has street lighting. The trailhead is Turtle Rock Community Park, 1 Sunnyhill Drive, Irvine, CA.
  • Tustin Branch Trail - Newport Avenue

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This trail is a sidepath along Newport Ave. that leads to shopping centers and can be combined with other trails in the area for active transportation opportunities. There are several major streets with signals that interrupt the flow of the trail. The Tustin Branch Line was used to deliver oranges from the Tustin Packing Co. to markets from 1905 until the Southern Pacific rail line washed out in 1969.
  • Tustin Branch Trail - Wanda Road

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This segment of the Tustin Branch Trail follows along Wanda Road from Villa Park Road, linking the bike lanes on Villa Park with the Santiago Creek Bikeway, northeast of E. Walnut Avenue. The trail follows a disused rail line that once serviced the orange-packing industry between 1905 and 1969.

  • Tustin Trail - Esplanade Ave

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    If you are looking for a quick escape from the smog and traffic of Southern California, take a trip along the Tustin Trail – Esplanade Avenue. This short trail winds through quiet, palm-tree filled neighborhoods of Tustin in Orange County. Feel the Santa Ana winds as they blow your worries away on this pleasant trail. The Tustin Trail – Esplanade Avenue occupies a wide strip of land, providing much more park space than a traditional trail. One reason not to miss this Southern California gem is the landscaping: the colorful flowers and shrubs that line the trail make for a serene experience. The hard-packed clay trail surface is comfortable for all types of trail use. You are likely to meet friendly locals out enjoying the trail.

    Beginning at the intersection of Fairhaven and Esplanade avenues, the trail parallels Esplanade Avenue heading south. The trail does have two busy road crossings; the first is at East 17th Street about 0.5 mile from the start and the second at Vanderlip Avenue, about 0.25 mile from the end of the trail.

    Just beyond Vanderlip Avenue, the trail runs past, and serves as a wonderful outdoor outlet to, urban Guin Foss Elementary School. A short distance beyond the school, the trail ends at Warren Avenue. Two other short sections of the Tustin Trail are located nearby: Newport Avenue and Wanda Road.

  • University Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The 3.35 mile University Trail ascends the Sand Canyon Wash beginning at the San Diego Creek Trail. It runs the length of the William Mason Regional Park in the wash along University Drive to end at the trail junction at the Jeffrey Overpass. It runs through two aspects of the William Mason Park, the landscaped picnic ground and the wild barranca down in the wash.

    The connections are of interest to the rider. It connects to five trails - the San Diego Creek Trail, the Turtle Rock Trail, the Woodbridge Trail, the Jeffrey Trail and the Quail Hill Trail. It almost connects to the Bonita Trail, 0.32 miles uphill. In almost any loop ride in southern Irvine, the University Trail will play a part.
  • Venta Spur Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The Venta Spur Trail is a 3.31 mile trail along the roadbed of a former rail spur. In 1916 the spur served the Frances Packing House on the Irvine Ranch. Today it serves the local neighborhoods. The western portion is shaded and lushly landscaped. The eastern portion is a bit more open. Quite a pleasant ride on both ends.

    The trail cuts across much of Irvine, from the Peters Canyon Wash to the 133 Toll road near the Great Park. It starts at the Peters Canyon Wash Trail between Kernville and Pacific Crest (GE: 33.723545° -117.780545°) and runs SE through the neighborhoods to end in a new subdivision between Sand Canyon Ave. and the 133 Eastern Transportation Corridor (toll road) at the junction of Crosspointe and Towngate (GE: 33.691804° -117.742068°).
  • Victoria Avenue Bike Path

    State: CA
    Length: 6.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Victoria Avenue Bike Path parallels a scenic parkway dotted with palm trees that was built in 1892 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The northeastern end of the trail offers a peaceful ride through charming Riverside neighborhoods. As the trail continues southwest, the views become more rural with stands of orange groves along the way.

    The route also offers a safe and convenient way for students to travel as the pathway is in close proximity to Gage Middle School, Washington Elementary School and Harrison Elementary School.
  • Walnut Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 3.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This great trail shares a wide corridor with an active railroad line, a Burlington Northern Santa Fe route, through a section of Orange County known for producing oranges and strawberries. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad line originally provided a vital link for transporting iron from the Midwest into the Los Angeles Area. In 1971 Amtrak assumed operation of the line, using it to transport passengers between Chicago and Los Angeles. Burlington Northern officially maintains the track and uses it for freight rail, in conjunction with the Amtrak and Metrolink passenger service.

    The trail itself begins off Sand Canyon Avenue just south of the railroad tracks. This well-maintained, smooth-paved trail follows the tracks heading northwest. You will cut through a section of the lush Oak Creek Golf Club before reaching the intersection of Jeffery Road. An underpass here provides safe, uninterrupted trail travel. Beyond Jeffery Road, the trail passes comes to grassy Hoeptner Park, which is a nice spot to rest or have a picnic. From here the trail crosses some pleasant neighborhoods. There are access points all along the trail, making it a popular commuting route.

    The trail passes underneath Yale Avenue and continues to busy Culver Drive, where a trail overpass carries you across the road. In addition, there are access points to the street and sidewalks if you need to connect to sections of town. The trail continues through Flagstone Park toward the end of the trail and provides a nice rest spot before making the final push. At Harvard Avenue the trail ends, but there are multiple connections here to bike lanes and other small trails to other parts of the city and region.

  • Watts Towers Crescent Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 0.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Grass, Woodchips

    This is a extremely short rail-trail that parallels an existing rail line in the vicinity of the Watts Towers Art center, home of the striking and unique sculptures know as the Watts Towers.

    DIFFICULTY:
    Easy

    FOOD:
    There are no restaurants or food markets along the route, but these can be found elsewhere in Watts and adjacent neighborhoods.

    REST ROOMS:
    There are no rest rooms along the trail.

    TRANSPORTATION:
    Transit information for Watts may be obtained by calling (800) COMMUTE in the Los Angeles calling area. The Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority Web site is www.met.net

    RENTALS:
    There are no rentals available along the route.
  • West Irvine Trail/Peters Canyon Bikeway

    State: CA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone

    To the rider, the West Irvine Trail and the Peters Canyon Bikeway are one continuous trail with two names in two cities. Both are dual track trails with a blacktop lane for bikes and a decomposed granite track for the joggers and equestrians.

    Together, they join the Peters Canyon Wash Trail in Irvine to the Peters Canyon Regional Park in Tustin with Class I bikeways. They are part of the collage of trails (Back Bay Trail, San Diego Creek Trail, Harvard Trail, Peters Canyon Wash Trail, West Irvine Trail, and Peters Canyon Bikeway) which make up much of the Class I portion of the Mountains to the Sea Trail.

    The West Irvine Trail starts on Bryan Ave. at the corner of the bridge over the 261 Toll Road. Across the bridge is the Peters Canyon Wash Trail. It runs across West Irvine and up Jamboree Rd. to Valencia Park, Irvine. There it dives under Jamboree and comes up in Tustin on the other side of the road.

    Now it becomes the Peters Canyon Bikeway as it heads up the other side of Jamboree to Portola Parkway, thence over to Tustin Ranch Rd and then cross-lots past Cedar Grove Park and under the heights of Lemon Heights to the Retarding Basin at the bottom of the Peters Canyon Regional Park.
    If you start at the Retarding Basin, gravity is your friend and it is alleged that you can almost coast all the way down to the Back Bay in Newport Beach. Its about ten air miles between the two points. You will do more on the trail, but its a nice downhill ride. Now, about getting back to your car&
  • PROJECT: West Santa Ana Branch/ Pacific Electric Corridor

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 20 miles
    Surface:

    The Pacific Electric Right-of-Way (PE ROW) / West Santa Ana Branch Corridor is a railroad right-of-way that extends for approximately 20 miles between the City of Paramount in Los Angeles County and the City of Santa Ana in Orange County. The railroad corridor was once part of the Pacific Electric Railway, or Red Car, system that provided mass transit service to Southern California from 1901 to 1961. Much of the corridor has been abandoned and is not currently used, but passes through heaviliy populated areas in need of transportation alternatives. Trail development will be challenging due to difficult street crossings in much of the corridor, but can be successful if combined with the development of mass transit on the corridor. Bellflower has already completed the Bellflower Bikeway in the corridor.

    The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), in coordination with the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) and the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), is conducting a transit Alternatives Analysis (AA) for the PE ROW / West Santa Ana Branch. The AA will examine potential transit service along the corridor that can provide additional travel options between Los Angeles and Orange Counties, reduce congestion on nearby streets and freeways, and provide adjacent communities with access to the regional transit network.
  • Westminster Hoover Street Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The trail is not actually on railroad property, but is immediately
    adjacent to an active Southern Pacific rail right-of-way and
    crosses an active U.S. Navy rail facility. Three transportation corridors run along Hoover Street between Bolsa Avenue and the Garden Grove Freeway; the four-lane street itself, the tracks of an active railroad, and a paved rail-trail.

    DIFFICULTY:
    Easy

    FOOD:
    There are no restaurants located along the route, but a neighborhood grocery store is on the corner of Trask Avenue and Hoover Street. Restaurants and supermarkets can be found elsewhere in Westminster.

    REST ROOMS:
    There are rest rooms at either trailhead, nor are there any along the trail.

    TRANSPORTATION:
    For transit information, call the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) at (714) 636-RIDE (7433), or write OCTA, 550 South Main Street, P.O. Box 14184, Orange, CA 92868-1584

    RENTALS:
    There are no rentals available along the route.
  • Whittier Greenway Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 4.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Whittier Greenway Trail occupies part of an abandoned railroad right-of-way in its namesake town, running parallel to Whittier Boulevard and Lambert Road between Mills Avenue and Pioneer Boulevard near I-605. An active rail line travels from Mills Avenue to the Whittier city limits; the town hopes to be granted an easement along this part of the rail so that the trail can continue into Whittier and link to trails in Orange County.

    Along this urban, and sometimes noisy, trail you'll find some interesting wind vane sculptures, along with nice landscaping with native California plants.

  • Woodbridge Trail

    State: CA
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The 2.91 mile Woodbridge Trail, while short, is the most scenic of the Irvine bike trails. Views of the two lakes and mountains unfold around each bend. Its a great ride for families and kids  and that is what you will find there, so, while the trail itself may be high speed, the curves and the traffic enforce a slower pace. Certainly so on a sunny weekend, with walkers, kids on Razors, mums with prams and such.

    It is well connected trail, crossing the San Diego Creek and Freeway Trails and ending at the University Trail. To the north, 0.7 miles of bike lanes take you to the Walnut (AT&SF) Trail, with connections to the Peters Canyon Wash Trail.

    It starts at the north end of North Lake at East Yale Loop and works south along the lake, then inland to get around a neighborhood and the beach club, then back along the lake to the overpass at Barranca Parkway. On the far side is the Woodbridge Village Shopping Center (shopping mall/food/parking, etc.).

    Cross the parking lot to the San Diego Creek Trail junction on the far side. The Woodbridge Trail takes the ped/bike bridge over San Diego Creek to the far side where the Woodbridge Community Park will be your full service trail head.

    The trail swings around the park, crossing Alton Parkway on an overpass. Check out the South Lake Gazebo and viewing deck just beyond. The trail diverts around a lakefront neighborhood to the tennis club junction. Straight ahead is more direct, but the right hand trail takes you back to the lake and a delightful bridge (not on the trail) as it swing around the tennis courts, down to the bottom of South Lake.

    Here East and West Yale Loops meet at Yale Ave. The trail is on the far side  up Yale Ave.  which dead ends in the Yale Ave. ped/bike overpass on the San Diego Freeway. There is also a side trail to the Freeway Trail. On the far side you can use the bike/walk on the east side of Yale to get down to University Drive. Cross at t
  • Yorba Linda Recreational Trails

    State: CA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    A Class I Recreational Trail, with parallel equestrian path, mostly built along an old El Cajon irrigation canal, goes above Philips Paxton Equestrian Center , weaving through the back yards in interesting horse country, a big succulent garden, into a ravine and up to a sidewalk on the Lakeview Ave Bridge over Imperial Hwy 91, (it is a bike lane on Lakeview Ave on return), doubles back to the Lakeview Ave underpass. Access to food & drink on Yorba Linda Blvd. Passes in back of President Nixons Library and Birthplace and through more estates. Then along Imperial Hwy by Hurless Barton Park, with restrooms and water fountains. Then back into suburban yards, with marked crossing of several busy streets, and ends at the sidewalk on Bastanchury Rd., 250 feet west of Compass Circle.
    Note: At Grandview Ave, the trail, minus the equestrian path, continues 0.3 mile, with a left turn to a wide sidewalk on the east side of Grandview Ave to Mountain View, then right down a short steep grade to Kellogg Rd.