• Allegheny River Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 5.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    If you find yourself in Allegany or Olean, New York, with a half hour to spare, this loop trail makes for a very enjoyable bike ride. Better yet, strap on your inline skates and do a lap or two with the other skaters, bicyclists, walkers, baby-jogger parents and training-wheel children who flock to this pleasant trail.

    Where a typical rail bed is stick straight, this 5.6-mile circular route winds and dips along a river valley. Its rail-trail designation comes from the active railroad that runs adjacent to the corridor for a short distance on the north side. There are 115 such rail-with-trail facilities in the nation.

    The southern half of the trail is on the Allegheny River, and the rest of the loop has many access points in the small communities of Allegany and Olean. Starting near the tennis courts of St. Bonaventure University and heading west brings you to the river quickly. The trail circles the school, making it popular with students who use it for recreation. A leafy tree canopy cools off summer days and in winter lets in warming sunshine. At the first bend, the trail descends a little and the river comes into view. Oaks, maples, ash and cherry trees enclose the trail. In first 2 miles a few well-designed small bridges carry you over small tributaries to the river, and the trail becomes slightly wider. Another slight descent, followed by a curve at 1.5 miles, warrants the trail's 15 miles-per-hour speed limit. Watch for oncoming traffic.

    At 2 miles the river widens and you reach Gargoyle Park, with parking, swings and plenty of room for children to run around, especially if they've been in a buggy or bike seat. Large shagbark hickory trees—with distinctive gray shaggy bark—dominate the park grounds. Soon after the park, the trail crosses a small stream on another bridge.

    When you reach the levee restraining the Allegheny River, you have gone 3 miles. Although it's unpaved, the levee is used as a bike and running path, a
  • Andes Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Grass

    The Andes Rail Trail begins in the quaint town of Andes in the beautiful Catskill Mountains region of southeastern New York and follows a branch of the former Delaware and Northern Railroad. The trail begins at the town's old train depot, which serves as an unofficial trailhead and which is hoped to one day be restored. From the depot, one can travel a mile along the trail's natural and grassy surface, still spotting old railroad ties in some places. Outstanding views of mountains, woodlands, fields, a babbling stream, and the remnants of an old stone mill can be seen along the way.
  • Auburn Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 9.1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Auburn Trail is a major cross-town, multi-use pathway, which provides connections to other trails and an up-close view of one of the oldest railroad buildings in the country.

    Start in Farmington at Mertensia Park. Shortly after leaving the park, the trail passes through a residential development. At Victor Road (about 0.75 mile) you encounter your first detour. Follow Victor Road to Break of Day Road to a left turn onto Brace Road and back to the rail corridor. The detour is about 0.9 mile long on residential streets with light traffic.

    Back on the trail, Victor Hills Golf Club is on the left. A little farther along, a restored train station and boxcars have been repurposed for business use. Just past these landmarks is the second and last on-road detour. Turn right on Maple Street, cross the railroad tracks and turn left onto Railroad Avenue. After one block, turn left onto School Street to return to the trail. To explore the shops and restaurants in the village of Victor, stay straight on Maple Street one block beyond Railroad Avenue until you reach Main Street.

    The trail is much more rural beyond Victor. Seneca Trail, a 7.5-mile hiking trail, branches right. In another 1.8 miles the trail passes under the Lehigh Valley Trail. To significantly boost your mileage, follow the Lehigh Valley Trail 15 miles west to the Genesee Valley Greenway.

    Next up on the Auburn Trail is Fishers, where the trail cuts through the parking lot of the Fishers Fire Company and passes the second oldest railroad feature in the U.S.—a cobblestone pumping station. The station supplied water to the steam engines that traveled this line from 1841, when the Auburn and Rochester Railroad began operation, through the 1853 consolidation into the New York C
  • Auburn-Fleming Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.6 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

    This is a flat 1.6 mile trail through woods, wetlands and farmland connecting Rt. 34 in the Town of Fleming to Dunning Ave. in the City of Auburn. It is an easy walk or bike through a very scenic area.

    To view a trail map, please see the Trail Website.
  • Ballston Spa Walking Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Ballston Spa Walking Trail spans 0.5 mile between Front Street and Prospect Street on what was once a railroad bed.

  • Ballston Veterans Bike Path

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This asphalt trail is the legacy of an inter-urban trolley system operated by Schenectady Railway Company (SRC) in the early 1900s. To attract visitors on weekends, SRC built an amusement park at Ballston Lake with a beachfront, some baseball fields and oval tracks for bike races and footraces. Passengers paid 25 cents to ride the wooden trolley car from Schenectady to Ballston Lake and beyond, even to Saratoga Springs. The trolley ceased operation in 1940, and the amusement park is just a memory now. There's good bass fishing at the fishing pier on Ballston Lake, not far from the Outlet Road trailhead.

    The Ballston Veterans Bike Path has a lot to offer. Informative signs fill you in on the trail corridor's history. Every quarter mile, mileage markers help you track your progress. The trail is conveniently reached from New York 146A, a main route into town. The bike path will someday link up with an emerging network of multi-use trails in Saratoga County.

    At the trailhead on Main Street watch for a monument dedicated to veterans from the town. Trees border much of the trail on one side, giving way for a time to scrub growth that allows a pleasing view of pastures and woods beyond. On the other side, a berm with sumac, holly and other shrubs separates the path from an active rail line. The Canadian Pacific tracks parallel the trail for most of its length. The path is open overhead so don't forget sunscreen.

    Parking at Outlet Road is limited. Across the road, the trolley corridor—overgrown—appears to continue. For now, however, you'll need to retrace your route back to the start. If you brought your fishing rod and license, turn on Outlet Road and look for the sign for the fishing pier.

  • Bethpage Bikeway

    State: NY
    Length: 12.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Bethpage Bikeway is one of Long Island's most popular trails. It connects Merrick Road in Massapequa with Bethpage State Park, and includes additional trail north to Trail View State Park in Woodbury. There are a few parkway exit crossings and a few moderately busy street crossings but safe for families with kids. All crossings are clearly marked, and drivers are generally courteous and alert.

    A major road crossing at Sunrise Highway, near the trail's southern end, has a stop light and crossing lane for safety.

  • Big Flats Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.7 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    A pleasant walk between wetland habitat and farmland, this short community trail sits atop a sewer line that Corning Glassworks installed to serve its Big Flats plant. Corning provided the crushed stone surface for the trail.

    The main trailhead is located near the center of the path off Kahler Road. A lovely new park with a pond, nature trail and a picnic pavilion is located here. It was developed by community volunteers in tribute to New York State Trooper Andrew J. Sperr, who was killed in the line of duty by suspected bank robbers. The park was designed as a continuation of the Lowes Pond wetland area.

    Heading west from the trailhead, the trail descends briefly and then flattens out for about a mile. Wetlands on both sides of the trail make this a great place to observe the variety of birdlife here. The trail ends at Winters Road (also called CR 17 and S. Hibbard Rd.) near some houses. This entire section of the trail is open wetlands and doesn't provide much shade.

    East from the Kahler Road trailhead is a more shaded experience. Woods on one side of the trail and a line of trees on the other keep you under leafy cover. The line of trees separates you from cultivated farmland until the trail dead-ends just before reaching Big Flats Road/County Route 64. There is no easy access to the road from this location.

    A local transportation council has recommended that the Big Flats Rail Trail be connected to Consumer Square Mall and Big Flats Town Center, and also extend to the Town of Horseheads, connecting it with the Catharine Valley Trail. If these extensions are made, this trail will become more than a pleasant place to walk or bike; it will be a useful transportation connection for the community.

  • Black Bridge Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Just north of Albany, the Black Bridge Trail connects the communities of Waterford, Cohoes, and Green Island in eastern New York. The trail was completed in 2011 and its centerpiece was the rehabilitation of the former Delaware & Hudson Railroad Bridge, built in the 1890s, that spans the Mohawk River.

    The trail begins in Waterford, a quintessential canal town home to both the Erie Canal and Champlain Canal. At the Waterford Harbor Visitor Center, you can learn about these important waterways, enjoy watching the locks and the boats going by, and walk to nearby shops and restaurants. Come on a Sunday and you’ll also find a lively farmers market.

    Two other recreational gems lie at the northern end of the trail: the scenic Champlain Canal Bike Trail and Peebles Island State Park, offering nearly 200 acres of woodlands to explore.

    In Cohoes, you’ll find another highlight of the trail: the Van Schaick Mansion, dating back to the Revolutionary War. The historical home is located at the intersection of Van Schaick and Delaware Avenues, and tours are available by appointment.

    From the end of the trail in Green Island, you can extend your journey on the Mohawk Hudson Bikeway, a beautiful section of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor, which continues west all the way across the state to Buffalo.

  • Black Diamond Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 8.4 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Crushed Stone, Grass

    Black Diamond Trail will one day stretch 15 miles to link four state parks in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Currently, 8 miles of the trail are open, which follow the Lehigh Valley Railroad route whose Black Diamond Express once ran from Buffalo to New York City and gives the rail-trail its name.

    The unpaved trail runs through a rural backdrop as it makes its way from Cass Park in Ithaca to Taughannock Falls State Park near Trumansburg. The southern half of the trail (about 4 miles) offers a pleasant walk from Ithaca.

    On its northern end, the trail is still walkable, but a few sections are overgrown. By the end of summer 2014, the trail is expected to be cleared and surfaced with crushed stone for the full 8 miles. Until then, the surface remains mostly railroad ballast and grass. There are no services along this trail.

    Plans are under way to take the trail further south to Buttermilk Falls State Park and Robert Treman State Park, and include a connection to the planned Gateway Trail.

  • Black River Feeder Canal Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 10 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel, Sand

    This trail follows the Black River Canal Towpath that links Boonville to Foresport. Running from Erwin Park at Boonville to Alder Pond at Forestport, it is a quiet walk or bike trip through woods and fields along the old towpath.

    The 77-mile canal was built between 1837 and 1855, connecting to the water of the Erie Canal. This provided the region with access to eastern and Midwestern markets and was essential to the region’s economic growth. This canal held and still holds the world record for 109 locks.

    The Black River Feeder Canal Trail now connects to the Black River Environmental Improvement Area (BREIA) Trail System, Boonville Youth Athletic Association, and Headwaters Shopping Plaza. Across from the Erwin Park entry, travelers can visit the Boonville Black River Canal Musuem which preserves, houses, and displays artifacts from the canal era. Kayaking and swimming are also popular activities along the route and it serves as an educational field trip destination.

    The canal is part of a much larger trail network called the North Country National Scenic Trail.

  • Black River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Black River Trail follows part of an abandoned segment corridor of the NY Central Railroad. The trail runs for 3.5 miles between the village of Black River and Watertown, following along the south bank of the scenic river, where you'll see two power dams.

    To extend this trail about 0.75 mile, head right out of the parking lot along Route 3, then turn left onto Remington Street, then left at the stop sign, and at the bottom of the hill (before crossing the bridge) turn right to Poors Island. Around this island are many dams and old mill structures—paper mills from the turn of the century. Orion Power has converted one of these structures into a covered picnic site on the northeast side of the island. There is a dirt trail on the island's south side and a gravel road on the north side.

    Note, there is another Black River Trail that runs north–sourth along the western edge of the Adirondack Mountains.

  • Bloomingdale Bog Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 16 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel, Sand

    The Bloomindale Bog Trail is located in the Adirondack Forest Preserve and is used by mountain bikers and hikers. The trail follows an old rail bed, and its southern segment runs through a bog. Beavers have dammed the stream, which requires walking your bike at one point, unless you want to get wet feet. Tree roots make for a bumpy ride, though the trail is mostly flat and suitable for beginner mountain cyclists.

    Cyclists please give way to hikers; all users be warned of black flies and other bugs until late June or early July.

  • Bog Meadow Brook Nature Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

    This out-and-back rail-trail's beautiful natural setting and informative signage invite visitors to appreciate the importance of wetland habitats. Located just east of downtown Saratoga Springs, the trail allows you to observe and learn about three distinct types of wetland: open marsh, wet meadow (with grasses, shrubs and small trees) and forested wetland (lush with moss and ferns among the trees). Kids may want to bring a fishing pole and drop a line from the bridge.

    Enjoying all this wetland comes at a cost. Portions of the trail may be damp, even in dry weather, and after a heavy rain the trail can be downright messy. Think of it this way: the soft surface makes it easier to spot tracks of deer and other animals that have crossed the trail.

    The initial 0.5 mile, from the start at Route 29, is smooth sailing. The trail is level and suitable for wheelchair use. For much of the rest of the trail, however, railroad ties remain visibly in place, making an uneven trail surface that is challenging even with a mountain bike. Pay attention to the posted warning that yellow jackets nest in the rotting railroad ties underfoot. If you have a bee-sting allergy, come prepared with emergency supplies.

    At about 1.5 miles a handsome wooden boardwalk spans open marsh. The boardwalk and its benches provide a rare opportunity to be surrounded by wetlands, while keeping your feet dry.

    The trail is maintained by volunteers of Saratoga P.L.A.N. (Preserving Land and Nature). The organization provides a trail-specific educator's guide with sample lesson plans and suggested activities for teachers and group leaders to borrow.

  • Briarcliff-Peekskill Trailway

    State: NY
    Length: 12 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Grass

    The Briarcliff-Peekskill Trailway is a 12-mile linear park that runs from the town of Ossining north to Westchester County's Blue Mountain Reservation in Peekskill. The trail is built on land orginally acquired in 1929 by the Westchester Parkway Commission for the construction of the Briarcliff Peekskill Parkway. Construction of the parkway, however, was confined to an area between Route 117 in Pleasantville and the New York State National Guard Armory in Ossining. In 1977, the remaining right-of-way was re-designated a trailway.

    The trailway affords walkers many beautiful vistas along the way, including views of water cascading over the magnificent stone spillway at Westchester County's Croton Gorge Park and a view of the Hudson River from the 560-foot high Spitzenberg Mountain at Blue Mountain Reservation.

    For more information and brochures of Westchester County operated trails, call the Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation at 914-864-PARK, or write the Department at 25 Moore Avenue, Mount Kisco, NY 10549.
  • Bronx River Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 18.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Dirt

    The Bronx River Greenway will one day stretch 23 miles along the river through New York's Westchester and Bronx counties. Currently, 18 miles of the trail are complete in disconnected segments largely paralleling the Bronx River Parkway. The pathway is part of the Bronx River Reservation, an 807-acre linear park that was established when the Bronx River Parkway was being built. The road opened in 1925.

    The pathway's paved sections include: a 1-mile loop near Oak Street in Mount Vernon beginning and ending at Oak Street; 4.6 miles between Palmer Road in Bronxville and Crane Road at Scarsdale Avenue in Scarsdale, with a loop around the small lake in Bronxville; 5 miles between Greenacres Avenue in Hartsdale and Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla; as well as several miles east of Woodlawn Cemetery, along Bronx Park, and through Starlight Park and Sound View Park.

    One of the more unusual sights along the way are the tall silos of Concrete Plant Park, which pay homage to New York City's industrial past. The seven-acre site also features a boat launch, waterfront promenade, and chess tables.

    During spring and autumn, portions of the Bronx River Parkway are closed to motor vehicles, making a nice alternative to the path for bikes and other trail users.

  • Catharine Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 12 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Catharine Valley Trail travels for 12 miles between Seneca Lake in Watkins Glen and Smith Road north of Pine Valley. The trail follows segments of the abandoned Northern Central Railroad and Chemung Canal towpath, which once ran through the Finger Lakes. Today, the route mostly parallels State Route 14. You'll find on-road sections in Watkins Glen and in the Millport area. Eventually the trail will head farther south to Horseheads.

  • Cato-Fair Haven Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 14.51 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Dirt

    The Cato-Fair Haven Trail (a.k.a. Cayuga County Trail) travels a little more than 14 miles through forest, wetland and tree farm.

  • Catskill Scenic Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 26 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    The Catskill Scenic Trail lives up to its name as it winds through a broad farming valley and small towns in New York's Catskill Mountains. The West Branch of the Delaware River is often in sight, with opportunities for fishing and wading in the river's cool waters. The route is primarily agricultural and can at times take your breath away—especially when the farm fields have recently been fertilized.

    The trail's west end is in the village of Bloomville. A short path downhill from the parking lot on Agway Road takes you across Route 10 and to the rail-trail. The Sheffield Farm Dairy plant, located in Bloomfield, contained the country's first milk pasteurization facility. The Ulster and Delaware railroad trains served the plant in the early 1900s. Some restoration work is currently underway on the dilapidated building. Continuing east, you cross a series of bridges back and forth over the river, and fishing access points are numerous.

    In South Kortright, the trail passes through a farmyard. Be prepared—and use caution—when resident turkeys approach looking for a handout. After crossing Route 10 again you will pass the beautiful Belle Terre facility. Formally a private estate, the grounds now house a substance abuse rehabilitation center.

    The West Branch of the Delaware River runs right along the trail for most of the 4 miles between Hobart and Stamford. There are some pretty spots to relax with a book or enjoy a picnic; consider heading in to Hobart via Maple Street to stock up on refreshments or to browse the used bookstores on Main Street.

    Entering Stamford the restored train station serves as an information center and houses the Catskill Revitalization Corporation, which owns and manages the Catskill Scenic Trail as well as the nearby Delaware and Ulster scenic railroad. Stamford sits at the base of 3,241-foot Mount Utsayantha. The mountain is named for a local American Indian maiden and the tragic legend at the heart
  • Champlain Canalway Trail: Glens Falls Feeder Canal Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 9 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Glens Falls Feeder Canal Trail begins at the Feeder Dam in Glens Falls and follows the Hudson River through town to the Champlain Canal, then turns south toward Fort Edward. The 8-mile trail follows a portion of one of New York's few remaining sections of the original 1820s canal system. There is one short on-road segment (1 mile) through Glens Falls that goes around the paper mill.

    The Glens Falls Feeder Canal Trail is part of the 71-mile Champlain Canalway Trail. As of 2011, only about 17 miles of the Champlain Canalway Trail are complete; another 14 miles are being planned or expected to be finished within the next few years. A multi-use trail, some sections will be open to snowmobiles.

    In Glens Falls you can also jump on the Warren County Bikeway by turning north onto Platt Street from Warren St. (Route 32), which will take you to Lake George. The way is marked.

  • Champlain Canalway Trail: Saratoga

    State: NY
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt

    The Saratoga segment of the 71-mile Champlain Canalway Trail includes three disconnected segments near the Hudson River, from Stillwater Township to the town of Saratoga. The longest section is under 1 mile and goes through Saratoga National Historical Park.

    As of 2011, only about 17 miles of the Champlain Canalway Trail are complete; another 14 miles are being planned or expected to be finished within the next few years. A multi-use trail, some sections will be open to snowmobiles.

  • Champlain Canalway Trail: Schuylerville

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Schuylerville segment of the 71-mile Champlain Canalway Trail rail runs between Schuyler House, past Lock 5 of the canal and does a loop around the island (Hudson Crossing Park). As of 2011, only about 17 miles of the Champlain Canalway Trail are complete; another 14 miles are being planned or expected to be finished within the next few years. A multi-use trail, some sections will be open to snowmobiles.

  • Charlie Major Nature Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.2 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Dirt

    The Charlie Major Nature Trail follows an abandoned right-of-way that once carried trains along the old Skaneateles Short Line Railroad. The railroad served millworks in the area, including paper mills, grist mills, distilleries, and woodworking mills, which were powered by Skaneateles Creek.

    The trail runs for just longer than 1 mile between Mill Road just north of Old Seneca Turnpike and Crow Hill Road in Mottville. The pretty little trail crosses the creek via three wooden bridges and meanders through a forested corridor. Along the way you'll see remains of the railroad, dams, and millworks buildings.

    Near the Crow Hill Road bridge on the Mottville end is a nice place to have a picnic along the creek. There is also a playground at the Mottville trailhead.

  • Chautauqua Rails-to-Trails

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 28.56 miles
    Surface: Concrete, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    Though mostly a continuous system of trails from Sherman north to Brocton, some segments of the Chautauqua Rails-to-Trails system go by other names (see below). All the trails are primarily grassy but some portions are gravel or crushed stone. They are handicapped accessible but can be rough going in places. In addition, cycling is popular, though hybrids and mountain bikes might be better suited for travel than road bikes.

    The scenic Chautauqua Rails-to-Trails travel through woodlands, wetlands and meadows, where wildflowers abound in spring and wildlife year-round, including beaver, turkey and deer. In winter the trail is popular with both cross-country skiers and snowmobilers; however, the trailhead parking lots are not plowed, so users must park along side roads.

    The trail has two on-road portions, which skirt part of a rail bed: 1.47 miles along Hannum and Summerdale roads (west of Lake Chautauqua); 0.92 mile along Titus and Kendrick roads (near the southern terminus in Sherman). In addition, there's a short break in the trail north of Colt Road (near Brocton), and the trail picks up again at Ellicott Road.

    The different segments of the Chautauqua Rails-to-Trails are as follows:

    The Alison Wells Ney segment runs between Fuller Street in Brocton and Bliss Road. The Laurie Baer segment travels along a Niagara Mohawk right of way between Bliss and Plank roads, crossing an original railroad bridge.

    The Nadine and Paul Webb Nature Trail extends 1 mile between State Routes 430 and 394. The pleasant trail passes through a wooded area and scattered farmland, ending at the Mayville lakefront at the northern end of Chautauqua Lake. Begin at Boxcar Barney's, a local ice cream and hot dog emporium. This portion also crosses an original railroad bridge. A short segment at the southern terminus in Sherman is locally called the Sherman Village–French Creek Nature Trail.

    The Portage Trail takes off from the rail-trail at the nort
  • Clarence Pathways

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 16.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Four trails make up the Clarence Pathways trail system: the 3.5-mile West Shore Trail, 4.8-mile Newstead Bike Path, 6.1-mile Clarence Bike Trail and 2.3-mile Peanut Line Trail. The trails radiate around the Buffalo suburbs of Clarence, Akron and Amherst.

    The 3.5-mile West Shore Trail in Clarence follows the West Shore & Buffalo Railroad corridor. This same corridor saw the very first passenger train stop in Clarence en route to Buffalo from Syracuse, on January 1, 1884. The paved West Shore Trail travels the rural outskirts of Clarence and connects a number of the town's parks with residential areas and the downtown. Traveling east the trail is bookended by rural farms and fields. In Clarence Town Park the trail shares a low-volume local road for 0.8 mile that provides access to the park and the park maintenance facility.

    As the trail passes through downtown Clarence, bike route signs keep you on track. Look for bike lanes on the sidewalk and brick pavers at street crossings. The West Shore Trail returns to a rural setting until reaching Davidson Road. Here the trail becomes the Newstead Bike Path, though there is little noticeable difference between the two.

    After 2.5 miles of passing through farmland and woodlots on the Newstead Bike Path, you reach Akron Junction and the connection to the Peanut Line Trail. The Newstead Bike Path continues north and east for another 2 miles through country landscape and near residential developments to the town of Akron.

    If you choose to branch off on the Peanut Line Trail you will follow a 6-mile rail-trail that stretches west toward East Amherst. The trail is named for the New York Central Railroad corridor it travels, dubbed the "Peanut Line" for its short length. The first 2.3 miles of the trail, in Newstead, are primarily rural farmland.

    When you reach the Newstead-Clarence town line, the Peanut Line Trail becomes the Clarence Bike Trail, though it is also known as the Peanut Line Trail
  • Corry Junction Greenway Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY, PA
    Length: 5.1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    Crossing the state line into New York near Erie, Pennsylvania, the 7.5-mile trail runs through the beautiful Brokenstraw Valley, passing small streams, a tamarack swamp, deciduous woods and wildflowers.

    The construction of railroad tracks through the piney woods of northern Pennsylvania in the early 1800s heralded a new era. By 1861 the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad (A&GW) intersected the Sunbury & Erie Railroad at a spot called, appropriately enough, Junction. The land at Junction was owned by Hiram Cory, who sold a small piece of this 63-acre holding to the A&GW Railroad in October 1861. Railroad superintendent Hill was so pleased by Mr. Cory's fair price that he renamed Junction in his honor, although he misspelled it in the process. That was the beginning of the City of Corry.

    In 1865 the Oil Creek Cross Cut Railroad from Oil City, Pennsylvania, across the state line to Mayville, New York, was completed. The line operated under a number of different names until December 29, 1978, when the last train from Corry to Mayville ran on what was then called the Titus Secondary Tract. Included in Corry's rich railroad history is the invention and manufacturing of the Climax locomotive and rail cars that the logging industry used from 1888 until the 1920s. The Northwest Pennsylvania Trail Association purchased a portion of the rail corridor from Corry to Clymer in 2003.

    The rough, hilly trail offers outdoor enthusiasts an adventure year-round. Several crossings do not meet the grade of the road or have inclines where cyclists may need to dismount. Transportation Enhancement funds (the largest source of federal funding for rail-trails) have been approved to make vast improvements to the trail surface, drainage and amenities, such as trailheads and signage.

  • Cross Island Parkway Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Cross Island Parkway Trail closely follows its namesake thoroughfare through northeastern Queens. From its northern end, you will soon enter Little Bay Park, which offers lovely views of the Throgs Neck Bridge and the bay.

    If you get thirsty or hungry mid-trail, a snack bar is available at the Bayside Marina, a pleasant place to rest with scenic views of the water, sailboats and open sky. Further south, two adjacent parks, John Golden Park and Crocheron Park, offer picturesque scenery, places to picnic and athletic fields.

    The trail ends at the doorstep to Alley Pond Park, which encompasses a diverse mix of marsh, forest and meadow habitats. Visit the park's Alley Pond Environmental Center (228-06 Northern Boulevard) to extend your journey on its nature trails or to learn more about the area and its wildlife through the center's educational programming.
  • D & H Canal & Gravity Railroad Heritage Corridor - Port Jervis Branch Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Gravel

    The City of Port Jervis is the latest community to save a portion of the former D&H Canal and turn it into a greenway for use by residents and visitors. A section of the canal, which is approximately one mile long, has been cleared and opened for hiking and biking. Additional work is planned including more clearing of trees and debris in the canal.

    Aside from the section behind a strip mall near the Metro-North train station, the canal walkway is entirely on publicly owned land or byways. The canal bed near the train station was destroyed years ago and what is left of the bank is privately owned and not accessible. The walkway was rerouted onto West Main Street until it turns northward onto Canal Street.

    The trail is marked with 4" x 4" metal signs with the letters "D&H" embossed in burgundy on a white background. The restoration and creation of this greenway was made possible through the efforts of The Office of the Mayor in cooperation with the Department of Public Works, the Minisink Valley Historical Society, the National Park Service and the Delaware and Hudson Transportation Heritage Council.

    Dogs are not permitted on any portion of the publicly owned canal towpath.
  • D & H Canal Heritage Corridor (O&W Rail-Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 11.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    Sandwiched between the Hudson River and the Catskill Mountains near the busy US Route 209 corridor, this trail has a little something for everyone. The Delaware & Hudson Canal Heritage Corridor (D & H Canal), which contains the Ontario and Western Rail-Trail (O & W Rail-Trail), has a southern end with a natural surface that welcomes equestrians, walkers, mountain bikers and winter sports enthusiasts. The northern 2 miles adjacent to US 209 are asphalt and add inline skaters, road bikers and wheelchair users to the mix.

    The D & H Canal was built in the 1820s to bring coal from the mountains of Pennsylvania to New York City markets. Laborers used picks and shovels to dig the 108-mile system. The canal operated until 1898 when it made the transition to faster and year-round rail transportation.

    Entering the trail from the south, off Rest Plaus Road in Marbletown, you are surrounded by a dense forest of primarily deciduous trees native to the area. Farmland is occasionally visible through the wood line.

    The hamlet of High Falls, at approximately mile 2, provides intriguing off-trail diversions. The D & H Canal Museum is just a block east from where the trail crosses State Route 213. There are also interesting shops and restaurants. Art galleries, antique shops, cafes and B&Bs can be found along the village's tree-lined streets.

    The trail stretches through more wooded terrain, with occasional glimpses of the Catskill Mountains to the west. Reaching US Route 209, the trail turns to run parallel to the roadway and is paved for 2.1 miles. Landscaping (trees and shrubs separating the trail from the busy highway) is maintained by area businesses and civic organizations. Eagle Scouts have constructed kiosks and benches along this section of the trail.

    The D & H Canal Corridor Heritage Alliance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the Delaware & Hudson Canal towpaths and th

  • D & H Canal Linear Park

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.7 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    The D&H Canal Linear Park is 45 acres with a trail situated along the historic D&H Canal. Remains of the original locks, dry dock and waste weirs are visible from the towpath trail. Interpretive signs are located in the park to assist the visitor identify the various canal structures. The trail is ideal for hikers, bikers, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, nature watching and fishing. Picnic tables and grills along with porta-johns are available at both accesses. The Bova Road access has a group picnic pavilion (fee).

    The trail occupies an abandoned right-of-way of the former New York, Ontario, and Western Railway Main Line through eastern Sullivan County, NY. The trail surface is unimproved and not maintained, making it rough going in places. The trail is heavily used by ORVs, so be warned if you're travel by bike or on foot. For this reason, pedestrians and cyclists should wear bright clothing and proceed with caution when using the trail.

    One segment of the trail between Firehouse Road at US 209 north to Herlings Road in Phillipsport is privately owned. You can bridge that portion at the Bova Road access by taking Ministers Flats Road to Phillipsport Road to Herling Road.

  • D & H Canal Park

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass

    Owned by the County of Orange and maintained by the Orange County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation, the D&H Canal Park is a 300-acre park with a one mile section of the Delaware and Hudson Canal (1825-1898) and a number of historic canal-era buildings. A National Historic Landmark, the D&H Canal Park is open every day from dawn to dusk.

    Park visitors can:

    Walk, bike, and cross country ski along the D&H Canal Towpath Trail; fish in the Neversink River; picnic or barbeque at the D&H Canal Park Visitor Center; or visit the Neversink Valley Area Museum.

    Rest rooms are available at the Visitor Center.
  • D & H Canal Trail - Bashakill Wildlife Management Area

    State: NY
    Length: 5.7 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Cinder, Dirt, Grass

    The Bashakill Wildlife Management Area is located on the Orange County-Sullivan County border just south of Wurtsboro, New York. It consists of over 3,000 acres of wetlands and uplands which were acquired by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) with funds from the 1972 Bond Act.

    The landscape offers scenic views and an unmatched natural setting for hiking, canoeing, birdwatching and fishing. Above all, it is a place to breathe deeply, to feel the beauty and peace of a unique, unspoiled place in nature.

    Within the boundaries of Bashakill you'll come across remnants of the old Delaware and Hudson Canal and New York, Ontario and Western Railway's Port Jervis to Kingston branch. The former towpath is suitable for walking, cross country skiing, and bicycling. However, the old railroad bed has not been graded nor have railroad ties been removed. Therefore, some walkers and bicyclists might have difficulty negotiating much of it.

    Operating any motorized vehicle within the Wildlife Management Area except on access roads and designated parking areas is prohibited.

    The NY State Department of Environmental Conservation may eject any person from the Wildlife Management Area for behavior that endangers the general safety of persons on the Area or interferes with the management and use of the Area's natural resources.

    Printed information about the Area may be obtained from the NY State DEC Bureau of Wildlife, Region 3 Office, 21 South Putt Corners, New Paltz, NY 12561.
  • Delaware and Hudson Rail-Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY, VT
    Length: 23.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    The Delaware & Hudson Rail-Trail quietly rambles over the rolling hills and farmland of western Vermont along the state’s border with New York, dipping into its western neighbor at the community of Granville. It traces an old Delaware & Hudson railroad line that operated between Rutland and Albany, playing a vital role in the slate industry in the late 1800s and early 1900s. When you reach Granville, be sure to take a short side trip to the Slate Valley Museum (17 Water Street) to learn about this interesting history.

    Today, the rail-trail exists in two segments of nearly equal length. To explore the northern section, begin at the Castleton trailhead. From the campus of Castleton State College, the trail delves into lush pockets of northern hardwood trees and provides a glimpse of Vermont farmland. After 7 miles you'll reach Poultney, near the Vermont/New York border. The trail ends shortly thereafter.

    The southern section of the trail begins in the rural New York community of Granville, known for its quarries that offer slate in a variety of colors. In the heart of town, you’ll cross the Mettowee River on a 140-foot pedestrian bridge.

    South of Granville, the crosses back into Vermont through a densely forested area. After passing through the town of West Pawlet, the trail opens up a bit, offering sweeping views of the surrounding hills and countryside. Don't be surprised to see deer all along this trail. After passing a parking area outside the small village of West Rupert, the trail continues only 0.5 mile farther before reaching its southern terminus, ending at the state border.

  • East Ithaca Recreation Way

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Gravel

    The East Ithaca Recreation Way on East Hill is primarily built upon the rail bed of the old Ithaca and Cortland Railroad, which later became part of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. The trail traverses a natural area along Cascadilla Creek between Pine Tree Road and Game Farm Road. Then it cuts south from Pine Tree toward Maple Avenue, following it west for a short distance before heading south behind neighborhood back yards to Honness Lane.

    You'll find rest areas with benches along the trail.

  • East River Bikeway

    State: NY
    Length: 3.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The East River Bikeway is part of the larger Manhattan Waterfront Greenway, which incorporates the Hudson River Greenway the Harlem River Greenway and the East River Esplanade. Together the four trails comprise a 32-mile path that circles the island of Manhattan (with some on-road segments).

    The East River Bikeway section runs along its namesake river between the Governor's Island Ferry terminal and E. 37th Street. To continue to the East River Esplanade segment, you'll have to follow an on-road detour around the United Nations between E. 37th and E. 63rd streets. View the greenway map for more details.

  • Eastern Parkway Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Eastern Parkway Trail is a 2-mile route along a tree-lined boulevard in Brooklyn's Crown Heights neighborhood. The path begins at Prospect Park, which houses some of Brooklyn's most popular attractions, including the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Prospect Park Zoo. Lincoln Terrace Park, at the trail's eastern end, offers tennis and basketball courts, a baseball diamond, and playgrounds.
  • Edwards Nature Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Edwards Nature Trail extends 3 miles from Town Barn Drive to Talcville Road in the village of Edwards. The crushed gravel surface follows and old rail bed and is suitable for hiking, biking and cross-crountry skiing.

  • El Camino: Butterhole-Seneca Park Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.25 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The El Camino: Butterhole-Seneca Park Trail (often more simply called the El Camino Trail) runs diagonally through a neighborhood and industrial properties in northeast Rochester on an abandoned CSX railroad corridor. Trains on the line once hauled coal to the now out-of-service Beebe Station power plant. Views from the trail are not completely dominated by the industrial landscape; the trail is bookended in both the north and south by scenic views of the Genesee River.

    Part of the trail’s unusual name refers to the former name (Butterhole) of the neighborhood from its time as a predominantly German enclave of Rochester. The neighborhood was supposedly named for the dairy farms that once dominated the area. At the trail’s northern end, the Frederick Law Olmsted-designed Seneca Park offers open fields, picnic shelters, a large pond, playgrounds and a popular zoo. Trail users can also connect to the longer Genesee Riverway Trail within the park.

    At the El Camino Trail’s southern end, a new small park (located at the intersection of Conkey and Clifford Avenues) has served as a natural community space for the neighborhood since it opened in 2010.

  • Ellicott Creek Trailway

    State: NY
    Length: 6.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Ellicott Creek Trailway is an asphalt path used for biking, walking, running, and rollerblading. This multiuse pathway travels along Ellicott Creek—a 47-mile waterway that flows from Bennington to the Niagara River. Located in Amherst, it also rides the outskirts of the University at Buffalo campus. The entire trail winds for almost 7 miles. Licensed dogs are allowed on a leash.

  • Erie Attica Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.3 miles
    Surface: Boardwalk, Crushed Stone

    The Erie Attica Trail lies in the Finger Lakes region of New York along the former railroad for which it's named. A glimpse of this past can be seen in the beautiful truss bridge that spans 220 feet across the Genesee River.

    The wooded rail-trail begins on the west end of Avon and continues west just over a mile to the Genesee Valley Greenway, which heads all the way north to Rochester. One day, the rail-trail will extend a bit farther west to River Road.

  • Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor

    State: NY
    Length: 365 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    The Erie Canalway Trail runs 365 miles, from Buffalo in the west to Albany in the east, linking other cities of Rochester, Syracuse, Rome, Utica, and Schenectady. As of August 2011, about 75% of the trail is complete with a few remaining gaps (information below). The trail is mostly level, although portions through the Mohawk River Valley are a little bit steeper.

    Most of the Erie Canalway Trail is surfaced in crushed limestone dust, which can be smooth and make for easy riding when dry, more difficult riding when wet or freshly laid. For this reason, if you're biking the trail, wider tires are recommended. Other parts of the trail are natural surface, which means tree roots and ruts can sometimes make for difficult biking or hinder wheelchairs. Even fewer sections have asphalt surfaces, and there are long sections in some parts of the trail that are on-road.

    Ever since the canalway system was replaced by highway, freight and air traffic, people along the extensive canalway have sought ways to revitalize their communities. As early as the 1960s, communities began to develop trail systems along their neighboring towpaths. Today these trails form a vital part of people's lives, not only providing recreation and non-motorized commuter alternatives, but invigorating communities through commercial, historical and artistic development, while linking neighboring towns.

    Trail segments of the Erie Canalway Trail include:

    Erie Canalway Trail: Buffalo to Tonawanda (Riverwalk)

    Erie Canalway Trail: Tonawanda to Newark (Erie Canal Heritage Trail)

    Erie Canalway Trail: Port Byron to Utica (Old Erie C
  • Erie Canalway Trail: Buffalo to Tonawanda (Riverwalk)

    State: NY
    Length: 13.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Erie Canalway Trail runs 365 miles, from Buffalo in the west to Albany in the east, linking other cities of Rochester, Syracuse, Rome, Utica, and Schenectady. Most of the trail is complete with a few remaining gaps. The trail is mostly level, although portions through the Mohawk River Valley are a little bit steeper.

    Most of the Erie Canalway Trail is surfaced in crushed limestone dust, which can be smooth and make for easy riding when dry, more difficult riding when wet or freshly laid. For this reason, if you're biking the trail, wider tires are recommended. Other parts of the trail are natural surface, which means tree roots and ruts can sometimes make for difficult biking or hinder wheelchairs. Even fewer sections have asphalt surfaces, and there are long sections in some parts of the trail that are on-road.

    This segment of the trail, following the Riverwalk along the Niagara River, is paved. It begins in downtown Buffalo and travels north to Tonawanda, where you can pick up the next section of the Erie Canalway Trail that continues 100 miles east through Rochester to Newark with some on-road connections. In Buffalo, you can also cross the river into Canada on the Peace Bridge to reach the Niagara River Trail.

    The Riverwalk is quite scenic and provides access to two popular recreational amenities in Buffalo: LaSalle Park and Riverside Park, which both offer athletic fields, places to picnic, and waterfront views.

  • Erie Canalway Trail: Little Falls to Albany (Mohawk-Hudson Bikeway)

    State: NY
    Length: 39 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Gravel

    NOTE: September 2011: A segment of the trail in the Fort Hunter area in eastern New York is closed until further notice because of the effects of flooding from tropical storm Irene. The adjacent roadway, Route 5S, is also closed. Long distance trail users should consider alternate routes, such as Route 5 on the north side of the Erie Canal from Fonda to Amsterdam. Please use caution if cycling the eastern portion of the canal corridor. Contact Friends of the Mohawk-Hudson Bike-Hike Trail for more information.

    The diverse Mohawk-Hudson Bike-Hike Trail is a rail-trail traveling through five municipalities, connecting ten parks, paralleling two rivers and offering dozens of scenic views. It is a mostly continuous asphalt trail with some on-road sections. The trail is the easternmost stretch of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor, which traverses the state from Albany to Buffalo. The segment between St. Johnsville and Cohoes is known as the Mohawk-Hudson Bikeway (named for the two rivers it traces) and is a treat of woods, meadows and rivers interspersed with city and suburban neighborhoods. One of the on-road detours is through Schenectady's well-preserved historical Stockade district.

    Built in a piecemeal fashion in the late 1970s and early '80s, this trail is still called by a different name in almost every town. In addition to referring to the map, you can get a detailed trail map, as well as a regional bike map, free from the Capital District Transportation Committee.

    A good place to start is Albany's popular Corning Riverfront Preserve, easily accessible from Interstate 787 South and close to the trail's southern end. Head 0.5 mile to the trail's start at Riverfront Amphitheater and Hudson River Way Pedestrian Bridge, where you are rewarded with striking views of downtown Albany. Then turn around and
  • Erie Canalway Trail: Port Byron to Utica (Old Erie Canal State Park)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 20 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Gravel

    The Erie Canalway Trail runs 365 miles, from Buffalo in the west to Albany in the east, linking other cities of Rochester, Syracuse, Rome, Utica, and Schenectady. As of August 2011, about 75% of the trail is complete with a few remaining gaps (information below). The trail is mostly level, although portions through the Mohawk River Valley are a little bit steeper.

    Most of the Erie Canalway Trail is surfaced in crushed limestone dust, which can be smooth and make for easy riding when dry, more difficult riding when wet or freshly laid. For this reason, if you're biking the trail, wider tires are recommended. Other parts of the trail are natural surface, which means tree roots and ruts can sometimes make for difficult biking or hinder wheelchairs. Even fewer sections have asphalt surfaces, and there are long sections in some parts of the trail that are on-road.

    Ever since the canalway system was replaced by highway, freight and air traffic, people along the extensive canalway have sought ways to revitalize their communities. As early as the 1960s, communities began to develop trail systems along their neighboring towpaths. Today these trails form a vital part of people's lives, not only providing recreation and non-motorized commuter alternatives, but invigorating communities through commercial, historical and artistic development, while linking neighboring towns.

    This segment of the Erie Canalway Trail extends from Port Byron to Utica. The 36-mile section between DeWitt and Rome is also known as the Old Erie Canal State Park and is a National Recreation Trail. Permitted uses include horseback riding and snowmobiling. For more information call the Canal Corporation: 800-4CANAL4 (800-422-6254).

    If you're continuing your journey east, there is a 12-mile gap in the trail between Camillus and DeWitt, where the trail picks up again at I-481 and continues east to Rome. There is another 6-mile gap in the trail in the city of Rome, then the trail b
  • Erie Canalway Trail: Tonawanda to Newark (Erie Canal Heritage Trail)

    State: NY
    Length: 100 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    The Erie Canalway Trail runs 365 miles, from Buffalo in the west to Albany in the east, linking other cities of Rochester, Syracuse, Rome, Utica, and Schenectady. As of August 2011, about 75% of the trail is complete with a few remaining gaps (information below). The trail is mostly level, although portions through the Mohawk River Valley are a little bit steeper.

    Most of the Erie Canalway Trail is surfaced in crushed limestone dust, which can be smooth and make for easy riding when dry, more difficult riding when wet or freshly laid. For this reason, if you're biking the trail, wider tires are recommended. Other parts of the trail are natural surface, which means tree roots and ruts can sometimes make for difficult biking or hinder wheelchairs. Even fewer sections have asphalt surfaces, and there are long sections in some parts of the trail that are on-road.

    Ever since the canalway system was replaced by highway, freight and air traffic, people along the extensive canalway have sought ways to revitalize their communities. As early as the 1960s, communities began to develop trail systems along their neighboring towpaths. Today these trails form a vital part of people's lives, not only providing recreation and non-motorized commuter alternatives, but invigorating communities through commercial, historical and artistic development, while linking neighboring towns.

    This section of the Erie Canalway Trail is also known as the Erie Canal Heritage Trail, which stretches 100 miles from Tonawanda to Newark, NY. For cyclists there are two main gaps in the trail that are bridged by riding on roads between Mayors Park (but keep to the south of the Canal along Creekside Drive) and Amherst Veterans Canal Park. There is another 6-mile gap from Amherst Museum Colony Park to Lockport (Clinton St.). You can pick up the Canalway Trail again just east of Lock 35 and continue all the way to Newark. There's a 30-mile gap in the trail from Lyons to Port Byron, where
  • Fonda, Johnstown & Gloversville Rail Trail (FJ & G Rail Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 10.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Fonda, Johnstown & Gloversville Rail-Trail (FJ&G) has one main section and one shorter section. The main segment runs for nearly 8 miles between Union Avenue in Johnstown and the intersection of Green Road and County Road 154 (Dennie's Crossing). The shorter, disconnected segment runs for just more than 1.5 miles between Vail Mills and Broadalbin.

    The trail follows a portion of Cayadutta Creek on a nicely paved corridor that once was the right-of-way for the Fonda, Johnstown & Gloversville Railroad. The FJ&G served communities from Schenectady northwest and north to the lower Adirondacks. The railroad had its start in 1867.

    Though much of the main trail passes through Johnstown and Gloversville, it still has a countryside feel to it and offers scenic views along a mostly flat corridor. The Vail Mills–Broadalbin segment runs from the visitors center east to S. 2nd Street; a short segment also heads west from the visitors center.

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt Boardwalk

    State: NY
    Length: 2.7 miles
    Surface: Woodchips

    The Franklin D. Roosevelt Boardwalk follows Staten Island's eastern shore from Miller Field -- a recreational area for sports, picnicking and bird watching -- to Fort Wadsworth. Highlights of the trail include spectacular views of the Verrazano Bridge, the Atlantic Ocean and South Beach.
  • Genesee Riverway Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 16.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Genesee Riverway Trail links the area's vast array of recreational, historical and cultural attractions to diverse neighborhoods and the Seaway Trail, Erie Canalway Heritage Corridor and the Genesee Valley Greenway. The Genesee Riverway Trail is popular for walking, jogging, bicycling, inline skating and cross-country skiing. You can also access the river for canoeing, kayaking, rafting, fishing and bird-watching.

    The trail runs from the scenic Ontario Beach park in Irondequoit and travels south into the heart of the city, taking in a dramatic long boardwalk in the river near Lake Ontario. From here the trail continues into downtown Rochester. A few scenic pull-outs offer stunning views of the high waterfalls along the river. Farther south the trail ends in the suburb of Brighton, where it meets the Erie Canalway Trail.

    You'll find signs along the way at major access points for directions, mileage and trail precautions. Most of the trail is accessible, although there are some steep, rough or narrow areas with limited passage for those with mobility concerns. Check with the city of Rochester for more details.

  • Genesee Valley Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 68.8 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    The Genesee Valley Greenway rolls through towns and countless landscapes from Rochester south to Cuba, New York. The greenway is a work in progress, but there is a long, continuous segment (37 miles) between Rochester and Sonyea that provides an off-road experience. As of spring 2012, 60+ disconnected miles of the trail are open to the public; several more are planned that will link the disconnected sections. On the off-road trail segments you may encounter missing bridges or occasional washouts requiring detours. For the latest trail information, visit Friends of the Genesee Valley Greenway.

    The greenway follows the old transportation routes of the Genesee Valley Canal and the Rochester Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Historical villages and connections with other trails and relics—such as surviving canal structures—provide a rich layer to this otherwise rural ride.

    Only the northern 2 miles of the greenway are paved. Cinder, grass and packed dirt give the rest of the trail a firm, level platform. From the start at Rochester's Genesee Valley Park are intriguing sights: you pass the Rochester International Airport fire training school and two charred airplane fuselages used in demonstrations. A short on-road detour along State Route 383 and Ballantyne Road takes you off and then back to the trail. A short side trail takes you north over historic Black Creek Culvert (circa 1838), one of the state's largest 19th-century canal culverts, before it dead-ends at an active rail corridor.

    Back on the greenway you pass a large tract of forest conserved by the Genesee Land Trust. At 5.5 miles is the impressive stone Canal Lock #2, one of the few surviving locks along the greenway.

    The village of Scottsville, at 9 miles, has connected itself to the trail via the Canal Street Boardwalk. After a detour into the village for refreshments, you can head across Oatka Creek to Canawaugus Park, which has
  • Gorge Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Crushed Stone

    The Gorge Trail is makes for a scenic walk or mountain bike ride near the town of Cazenovia. The trail runs between the old railroad buildings on William Street and Bingley Road to the north. From here, you can continue on the Link Trail, which incorporates the Gorge Trail, although the Link Trail is for hikers only.

    The Gorge Trail follows part of Chittenango Creek along a wooded corridor on the old Lehigh Valley Railroad right-of-way.

  • Groveland Secondary Trail (York to Alexander)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 20 miles
    Surface: Ballast

    The Groveland Secondary Trail follows a portion of abandoned right-of-way of the old Groveland Branch of the Erie Lackawanna between York and Alexander. The York terminus begins just east of Main Street (SR 36) along Genesee Street (SR 63) by the bridge. From there the trail heads north and west to Alexander, ending at Old Creek Road just south of Peaviner/Hunn Roads.

    The trail passes among farmland, with several interspersed woodlands, passing through the communities of East Bethany and Linwood. The trail is open to horseback riders, mountain bikers, hikers, cross-country skiers and snowmobilers.

  • Harlem Valley Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 16.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    Harlem Valley Rail Trail provides a scenic ride through rolling farm fields and dense woods on the bed of the New York and Harlem Railroad that ran from New York City to Chatham. The rail-trail is being built in segments, and there is still work to be done to open all 46 miles of the planned trail. For now, you can enjoy three disconnected segments, which total 16 miles.

    The southern end of the trail begins at the Metro North Railroad Station in Wassaic. It is possible, during non-rush hours and on weekends, to board a Metro North train in Grand Central Station and in a little more than two hours be peddling or walking along this rail-trail. As the paved trail winds north for nearly 11 miles to Millerton, it passes through a pastoral scene. Farmland stretches before and around you, followed by red-cedar scrubland and beaver ponds. In Amenia, the trailhead parking lot is on the site of the former Barton House, a large hotel that was frequented by business people and vacationers traveling from New York City.

    Several railroad stations on this line have been restored: Sharon Station is now a private residence located off the trail in the town of North East. Millerton's three stations have been restored and today house local businesses. North of Coleman Station the trail crosses six reconstructed railroad bridges.

    The railroad builders tamed the area's rolling terrain, and created a level corridor, by blasting through rock and building the rail bed up from the land adjacent to the corridor for a "pyramiding" effect. In several stretches, north of Route 61, the trail's higher elevation on steep embankments—in some places dropping 50 feet—provides spectacular views of the surrounding farmland. Indian Mountain, straddling the border of New York and Connecticut, is to the east. Traveling through a series of deep rock cuts, you will feel the temperature drop several degrees from the surrounding landscape.

    Millerton is the current

  • Helderberg-Hudson Rail Trail (aka Albany County Rail Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.9 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Gravel

    More than half of the planned 9-mile Helderberg-Hudson Rail Trail, formerly known as the Albany County Rail Trail, is now open. Although currently only pedestrians are permitted to use the trail, additional upgrades will eventually allow bicycles.

    The rail-trail follows the path of the former Delaware & Hudson (D&H) Railroad, later the Canadian Pacific Railway, which was abandoned in 2003. In the future, the trail will extend further east to Albany and be paved.

  • Heritage Trail (aka Orange Heritage Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 11.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    Much of the Heritage Trail, a.k.a. the Orange Heritage Trail, sails past wide fields of corn and wheat. The right-of-way is 11.5 miles, but a gap in the west end creates two distinct trails, a 9.1-mile paved section and a 2.4-mile unpaved segment. With the exception of the 0.5-mile, on-road detour in between, there are only a few street crossings, making this an ideal destination for families with young children.

    The longer portion of the Heritage Trail starts in Monroe at Crane Park, also called Airplane Park for the old Saber fighter jet in a corner of the park along Mill Pond Parkway. The smooth pavement here draws bicyclists, inline skaters, wheelchair users and parents with strollers. Just beyond the park, Orange-Rockland Lake dominates the view to the right. The park-and-ride lot along Orange and Rockland Road makes the trail an excellent active transportation corridor for commuters taking public transit.

    In the village of Chester is a restored stone-fa├žade train station that serves as the Chester Depot Museum. Shops in the village offer mid-trip refreshments. Before you reach the village, you pass an old cemetery with weathered headstones dating to the 1800s. Between Chester and Goshen, the trail is lined with trees as it passes through farmland and wood lots and by residential developments.

    The road detour begins with the end of the trail's paved section at St. James Place in Goshen. The traffic control signals and crosswalks make the detour easy to see. Follow the long narrow parking lot for two blocks, crossing Bruen Place and Greenwich Avenue. After crossing Greenwich Avenue, proceed as straight as possible to cross West Maine Street at the well-marked pedestrian crosswalk. Cross Grand Street at the pedestrian crosswalk and proceed on the sidewalk to cross Grant Street. Proceed around the right side of the restored railroad depot, which now serves as the Goshen police station. Follow Railroad Avenue around a townhouse development to c
  • High Line

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Concrete, Grass

    The High Line rail-trail is an urban marvel, stretching 1.5 miles and towering almost 30 feet above street level through several neighborhoods in the lower west side of Manhattan.

    The first section of the High Line was opened in 2009 and runs approximately 10 blocks from Gansevoort Street to the north entrance at 20th Street. The second section of the High Line, from 20th Street to 30th Street, opened in June 2011 and doubled the length of the current trail. In September 2014, a new segment, known as High Line at the Rail Yards, extended the trail farther north to W. 34th Street.

    The corridor was built in the 1930s to remove rail traffic from streets bustling with industry. The elevated design improved street-level safety and allowed freight cars to roll directly into the buildings so that workers could load livestock and meats at the slaughterhouses and agricultural goods at factories and warehouses. The corridor fell into disuse in 1980. While owners of property under the High Line lobbied—unsuccessfully—to level the structure and make way for development, the neglected corridor quietly turned into an overgrown natural landscape.

    In 1999 Chelsea residents Joshua David and Robert Hammond founded an organization to preserve the demolition-bound corridor as a public park. Friends of the High Line waged a hard-won battle that resulted in the support of city officials, and in 2005 the transfer of High Line ownership from the CSX Rail company to New York City.

    To experience the High Line is to have a rare view of the city skyline and the Hudson River, with the amenities (and restrictions) of a popular public park. The finished portion of the greenway artfully incorporates characteristics of the old corridor. Sections of original railroad track are visible in the concrete slab designs that make up the surface of the path. Other sections of the trail reveal original art-deco steel railings paired with modern wooden be

  • Hojack Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.5 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    This pleasant community trail connects suburban residences close to the shore of Lake Ontario with a school, a church and a commercial area in Webster, New York. Near the trail's northwest end, it connects with old-growth forests and unique coastal lands preserved by the town.

    The trail takes its name from the Lake Ontario Shore Railroad's "Hojack Line" that served the area's apple orchards and other agriculturally based businesses. The tread varies from small sections of crushed stone to packed cinder ballast and mowed grass.

    Starting at the trailhead at Vosburg Hollow Nature Preserve gives you instant access to a wooded hilltop hiking path, the Vosburg Hollow Nature Trail, which leads you about an eighth of a mile through a red pine forest to the longer Vosburg Hiking Trail and the Gosnell Big Woods Preserve beyond. The branch trail offers a bike rack so you can lock up your bike and continue on foot to the top of the hill.

    Staying on the Hojack rail-trail, you can head less than 0.5 mile north and west of the trailhead to Lake Road. You cannot, however, reach the shore or get a good vista point until you travel west on Lake Road for 0.25 mile.

    Heading east the rail-trail passes through sections of grasslands and deciduous wood. The route looks and feels remote but is never far from busy roads and homes. It is only when you come to the half-dozen road crossings that you realize you are not, in fact, traveling through the wilderness.

    For now, the trail comes to an abrupt end between Hard and Holt roads. You can exit the trail at Hard Road or opt to continue on foot through a small nature park, called North Ponds Park, and make your way through a condominium complex onto Holt Road. Better yet, head back toward the Vosburg Hollow Nature Trail for a longer adventure.

  • Hook Mountain/Nyack Beach Bikeway

    State: NY
    Length: 4.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    While not a "rail-trail," the Hook Mountain/Nyack Beach Bikeway is a very scenic trail along the Hudson River in Rockland County.

    The southern half of this trail is flat and runs right along the river at sea level. It is wheelchair accessible from the parking lot at Nyack Beach State Park and even beginner bicyclists can easily travel on it. There is a paved connection to the Rockland Lake State Park area from this trail.

    The northern half of the trail is hilly, narrow and quite rocky. It runs along the cliffs and should only be ridden by experienced bicyclists riding bikes in good condition.

    Great views of the Hudson River and Palisades Cliffs rock formations are available from either trail segment.

    If you live in the Rockland County area this trail shouldn't be missed.
  • PROJECT: Hoosick River Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface:

    The Hoosick River Greenway is a joint development effort between the Village of Hoosick Falls and the Hoosick River Watershed Association. The Village purchased 2.5 miles of abandoned railroad corridor in 2009 running beside the river. The Greenway will provide opportunities for walking, cycling and cross country skiing. By providing access to the Village shops and restaurants the Greenway will contribute to the economic vitality of the region. Development of the Greenway will be a multi-year project that will include design, construction, amenities and landscaping.
  • Hudson River Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Hudson River Greenway provides a continuous 11-mile route between Battery Park at the southern tip of Manhattan and the Little Red Lighthouse underneath the George Washington Bridge. The trail passes through Hudson River Park, Riverside Park South, Riverside Park and Fort Washington Park.

  • Hudson Valley Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.57 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Located in the mid-Hudson Valley is a remarkable trail that is picturesque and family friendly. This flat, paved Hudson Valley Trail stretches a little more than 2 miles through hardwood forests, over Black Creek and under two spectacular stone-arch bridges. The trail stretches between the towns of Highland and Lloyd on the former right-of-way of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. Ulster County acquired the line when the railroad went bankrupt then deeded the section from the Hudson River to Route 299 to the town of Lloyd.

    The corridor sat vacant until the town sold an easement for the installation of a fiber optic cable along the unused line. With funding in place, the citizens of Lloyd and members of the Highland Rotary Club prepared for trail development by clearing the right-of-way of brush and debris. Some of the old railroad signal structures were left to provide a link to the corridor's past. In 1997 the first section of trail was opened.

    From Tony Williams Park in Lloyd the trail heads east though a wooded canopy. Less than 0.5 mile from the park, the trail crosses over Black Creek, which is a popular spot with kayakers and canoeists. Close to mile 1, the trail runs along a rock cut. In the spring, graceful columbine plants sprout out of the cracks in the rock. The cut provides a cool spot to stop and relax on hot summer days.

    At the trail's midpoint two magnificent arched bridges carry New Paltz Road over the corridor. Next up is the Highland Rotary Pavilion. The Highland Rotary Club has made the Hudson Valley Rail Trail a primary project for more than a decade. The pavilion has restrooms, a large parking lot, a fully restored caboose, picnic tables and water.

    As you move east and south, trailside exercise stations let you test your endurance and strength. You are now nearing the hamlet of Highland with residential neighborhoods on a less heavily wooded trail. There's a new pedestrian Bridge over Vineyard Avenue a
  • Hutchinson River Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Hutchinson River Greenway offers a convenient alternative to the Hutchinson River Parkway, which it closely follows. Although adjacent to the busy thoroughfare, trees have been planted along the route to help beautify the path and trail-goers can also catch glimpses of the river on their journey. If you wish to continue south to Ferry Point Park to enjoy spectacular views of the Manhattan skyline and the waterfront, a bike lane along Brush Avenue will take you there.

    Future plans include extending the trail north to Co-op City, a sprawling residential area, and Pelham Bay Park, an expansive natural area of marsh and forest habitat.
  • Hyde Park Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 10 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    The Hyde Park Trail is a 10-mile system connecting national historic sites, town parks and nature preserves in Hyde Park, New York. The trail connects the national historic sites of Vanderbilt Mansion, Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Eleanor Roosevelt ("Val-Kill"). The Hyde Park Trail is the first designated section of the Hudson River Valley Greenway Trail.

    In addition to this primary trail, other nearby loop trails include the Winnakee Nature Preserve, Hackett Hill Park and Pinewoods Park. For maps and other information, visit http://www.hydeparkny.us/Recreation/Trails/.

    Future connections include a proposed trail south along the Poughkeepsie waterfront and north to Norrie State Park.

    Bicycles are permitted on Roosevelt Farm Lane only (connecting the Home of FDR with Val-Kill) from March through November. For a brochure or trail map, contact:

    Hyde Park Recreation Department
    845-229-8086.

  • Irondequoit Lakeside Multi-Use Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Concrete

    Following the shore of Lake Ontario from the Irondequoit Bay to the Genesee River, the Irondequoit Lakeside Multi-Use Trail provides scenic views of the area's three major waterways. The path, built on a former railroad bed known locally as the Hojack Line, traverses east-west across the town of Irondequoit and passes through the northern end of Durand Eastman Park, a beautiful stretch of woodland with sloping ravines, wildflowers and a lakeside beach. To continue the journey, trail-goers will find a signed, on-street connection to the Genesee Riverway Trail at the trail's western end.
  • Jack Harrington White Plains Greenway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.2 miles
    Surface: Woodchips

    The Jack Harrington White Plains Greenway was recently renamed to honor a long-time member of the city's conservation board. The trail's corridor follows the former New York, Westchester & Boston Railway right-of-way, extending from a City parking lot at Mamaroneck Avenue opposite Bloomingdale Road to the Scarsdale border.

    Part of the corridor, the section between the parking lot at Mamaroneck Avenue and Gedney Way, is unimproved and currently inaccessible. This section is 0.4 miles long.

    The part of the corridor that offers a useable, improved trail begins at the intersection of Gedney Way and Pleasant Avenue, where you will find a large brown sign with yellow lettering. From Gedney Way, the usable trail heads south, adjacent to the DPW facility and residential neighborhoods. The trail is 0.8 miles long between Gedney Way and Ridgeway. From Ridgeway to the Scarsdale border, the trail is 0.5 miles long, ending at a small swamp.

    Use of the entire Greenway is restricted to pedestrian traffic. Note that several major streets intersect the Greenway, including Bryant Avenue, Gedney Way, and Ridgeway. The surface is very well maintained with wood chips and has been cleared of nearly all trees since Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
  • Jim Schug Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.2 miles
    Surface: Grass, Gravel

    The Jim Schug Trail offers a short, sweet excursion in New York's Finger Lakes region. The trail was known as the Dryden Lake Trail until it was renamed in 2002 in memory of the late town supervisor who acquired the land. The trail follows a remarkably level Lehigh Valley Railroad corridor; the railroad constructed the bed by creating cuts and using the removed earth and rock to fill in low spots. The resulting trail is level, while the surrounding landscape dips and rises, leaving you on an elevated berm or passing through cuts where ground level is above your head.

    There are numerous road crossings—many with small parking areas—that provide easy trail access. From the village of Dryden, the trail runs south and east; it also links with the Finger Lakes Trail, a footpath for hikers.

    Begin in Dryden on West Main Street at the signboard for the Agway store. (There are plans to extend the trail another 3 miles from Dryden north to Freeville.) A half mile south a railroad bridge carries the trail over Virgil Creek. Benches mark your distance every 0.5 mile, and accompanying informational signs reveal historical and natural features along the trail.
    When the trail crosses State Route 38, the landscape becomes more rural. Farm fields and silos, woods and wetlands lie ahead. Don't hurry through the next mile but rather sit and listen to the sounds of the wetlands. In the evening, especially in spring, the sounds of frogs surround you.

    The area around Dryden Lake and along the trail is said to have some of the best birding in the Finger Lakes region. Dryden Lake Park surrounds the lake and has picnic tables, a pavilion and fishing access, including a handicapped-accessible platform. All seasons see activity on the lake: Birders flock to the area for waterfowl in the spring and fall. In the winter, the lake is a popular spot for ice fishing.

    Adding to the bucolic appeal is an array of cultivated, alien and native plant species. Fr
  • John Kieran Nature Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel, Woodchips

    The John Kieran Nature Trail is a short loop that borders Van Cortlandt Lake and its associated wetlands. It is a wonderful site for bird-watching. The trail also passes several sites of significance including an old cemetery and the 67-acre Parade Ground, a large field that was once the site of a large Native American settlement. A portion of the trail is on the former Putnam Line of the New York Central Railroad that once connected New York City to Brewster and points north.
  • Jones Beach Bikeway (Ellen Farrant Memorial Bikeway)

    State: NY
    Length: 5.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Jones Beach Bikeway is a paved bicycle and pedestrian path on the southwestern end of Long Island that parallels Wantagh Parkway from Seaford to Jones Beach State Park. The trail is also known by two other names: Ellen Farrant Memorial Bikeway and Wantagh State Parkway Shared-Use Path.

    At the trail's northern end is Cedar Creek Park, which offers a spacious 259 acres on which to play tennis, basketball, softball, football, and soccer. Other amenities include an archery range, large playground, dog run, roller rink, sledding hills, and even an aerodrome field for radio-controlled airplanes.

    A new extension on the trail's southern end, which opened in May 2013, gives trail-goers a direct connection to Jones Beach and the boardwalk. A new storage facility for 100 bicycles is also being constructed adjacent to the park's East Bath House.

    Future plans include connecting the trail to the planned Ocean Parkway Bike Path, which would start at Jones Beach State Park and stretch 14 miles east along the scenic coastal roadway.
  • Jones Point Path

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

    The Jones Point Path occupies an abandoned motor vehicle route (old US Route 9W). The path provides bicyclists with a relatively safe bypass to a dangerous section of busy US Route 9W near Bear Mountain, NY. It also serves as a connecting trail between two poplular parking lots/trail heads used by day hikers.
  • Joseph B. Clarke Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    These three contiguous trails—the Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail, Old Erie Path and Joseph B. Clarke Trail—occupy the former right-of-way of the Erie Railroad's Nyack and Piermont Branch. Each trail is fairly short but taken together they make for a wonderful experience along the banks of the Hudson River.

    The Joseph B. Clark Trail travels between Greenbush Road and Oak Tree Road, traversing neighborhoods, the village of Sparkill and forested areas. There are bridges over, and viaducts under, busy highways and roads, with some street-level crossings to be cautious of. Northeast of Sparkhill village the trail links up with the Old Erie Path along Piermont Avenue.

  • Kaaterskill Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Concrete, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    The Kaaterskill Rail Trail offers a beautiful wooded walk through Haines Falls in eastern New York, nestled in the northern Catskills. It begins at the historical Ulster & Delaware Train Station, built in 1913, that serves as headquarters for the Mountain Top Historical Society and offers a small museum and information center. The rail-trail continues along the former U&D Railroad, which once took tourists through the area, into the Kaaterskill Wild Forest to end at the top of Kaaterskill Falls, one of the highest waterfalls in the state.

    A future extension will link the rail-trail to the Escarpment Trail, which offers a rugged and scenic hiking experience, and the popular North-South Lake State Campground.
  • Kennedy Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.7 miles
    Surface: Cinder

    The Kennedy Trail begins at the northwest corner of the 68-acre campus of John F. Kennedy Catholic High School in Somers. The town, which sits 30 miles from White Plains and 55 miles from New York City, is home to an IBM campus and Pepsi headquarters.

    The cinder trail, built on a former rail bed, winds through a heavily wooded area for just under 2 miles. Along the way, keep an eye out for old railroad ties and muddy patches of trail.
  • Keuka Outlet Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Dirt, Gravel

    In the heart of New York's Finger Lakes Region is a rail-trail that is part natural wonder and part industrial archaeology, and the 7-mile trail Keuka Outlet Trail has a unique heritage. Technically a stream, the 8-mile Keuka (KYOO-ka) Lake Outlet physically connects Keuka Lake to Seneca Lake in the east, the only two Finger Lakes in New York connected by a natural waterway. The outlet also connects the historic lakeside village of Penn Yan on Keuka Lake (settled in 1833 by Pennsylvania Yankees) with Dresden on Seneca Lake.

    Settled in the late 1700s by the Society of Universal Friends, the waterway became a gateway to western New York State. At its height of development in 1830, the 8-mile Keuka Lake Outlet, then called Crooked Lake, supported as many as 40 mills and 12 hydropower dams. The dams powered lumber mills and, to a lesser degree, tanneries, distilleries and mills producing linseed oil, grain and plaster. As the boon of canal transportation took hold, New York state built the Crooked Lake Canal along the length of the outlet. It was a colossal venture. Twenty-seven locks were built of stone and wood along the 8-mile waterway (by comparison, the 360-mile Erie Canal has only 90 locks). After an initial positive impact on the economy, the canal required constant repair and construction. The state legislature eventually sold the land in 1878 to businessmen who converted the canal corridor to the Penn Yan and New York Railroad Company. New York Central ran the railroad until 1972 when floods from Hurricane Agnes destroyed the corridor.

    The original canal dropped approximately 270 feet over an 8-mile section between Penn Yan and Dresden to the east. After the locks were removed, a number of waterfalls naturally developed; the waterway now attracts recreational paddlers. The water flow is controlled by a dam at Penn Yan and can change drastically from week to week, or even day to day. The trail itself remains fairly level for the entire 7 miles.
  • Kings Park Hike & Bike Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Kings Park Hike & Bike Trail runs for 1.5 miles between Old Dock Road at Church Street in Kings Park and Nissequogue River State Park. The trail is a town of Smithtown park and follows an abandoned railroad corridor that was once an old spur to Kings Park State Hospital.

    There are plans to extend the trail from its current end at Old Dock Rock south along the park to Main Street.

  • Klara Sauer Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The Klara Sauer Trail (formerly known as the Beacon Riverside Trail) runs for 1 mile along the Hudson River on the west side of New York's village of Beacon. The trail occupies the same corridor as the live commuter rail, between the Beacon train station and Dennings Point.

    The trail is natural surface and wheelchair accessible. Cyclists, walkers and anglers use the trail, which also offers nice bird-watching along the river. You can link to another mile or so of trail at Dennings Point on the southern end of the Klara Sauer Trail. There are plans to link the trail to others in the area.

  • Lackawanna Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Lackawanna Rail Trail spans Elmira, New York, linking famous Eldridge Park with the city’s waterfront. The paved trail uses a former Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad corridor for most of its route.

    In the north, Eldridge Park offers a lake with an encircling walking trail, along with typical park fare such as a playground, baseball diamonds, soccer fields and picnic pavilions. Because the area was once home to an amusement park of the same name, a restored carousel, dance hall pavilion, game arcade and ice cream shop are also featured.

    A spur takes trail users east from Eldridge Park along Diven Creek to Lake Street. The main route extends south from the park, paralleling Clemens Center Parkway before turning to the east at E. Washington Street. Refurbished railroad bridges take trail users over cross streets. At the southern end, the trail follows Newtown Creek, offering a more peaceful setting.

    The City of Elmira is currently working on improving an original railroad trestle over Newtown Creek near Jones Island. A 5-mile extension to the existing trail will eventually be built, ultimately linking Elmira with Lowman along Interstate 86 and the Chemung River.

  • Lake Ontario State Parkway Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Travelers on the Lake Ontario State Parkway Trail will enjoy scenic views of wooded areas, surrounding bodies of water and wetlands. The trail parallels the north side of the Parkway, which runs along Lake Ontario's southern shore. For longer excursions, adventurers can connect with the Genesee Riverway Trail at the trail's eastern end.
  • PROJECT: Lake Placid to Saranac Lake Bike Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 8.6 miles
    Surface:

    The Adirondack North Country Association has successfully applied for $796,575 in Transportation Enhancements Program funds to build a 9.1 mile bicycle and pedestrian trail that will link the communities of Lake Placid and Saranac Lake through a rail-with-trails path within the Remsen/Lake Placid corridor. Currently, travel between Saranac Lake and Lake Placid is limited to a single highway with minimal shoulders.

    According to Ted Blazer, President and CEO of the Olympic Regional Development Authority, "There is really no opportunity for youth, seniors or families with children to travel between the two communities by bicycle. Nor is there an adequate way for our tourists to traverse between Lake Placid and Sarnac Lake. Adding a bicycle path to the Adirondack Railroad tourist train corridor will improve the quality of life for residents in each community by providing alternative transportation and recreation opportunities."

    Jack Favro, Director of the U.S. Olympic Training Center, preditcts that the U.S. Olympic Training Center "will especially benefit from the path as we service over 7,000 athletes per year, many of which live in the surrounding communities. We would estimate approximately 25% of our athletes would use this path daily."

    Peter Gores, General Manager of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad, notes that his company believes in sharing the right-of-way and they think the trail will have a positive impact on both the economy and the environment.

    The Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) has coordinated the interests of over twenty local organizations, agencies and businesses that have expressed unanimous support for the project. Led by Terry Martino, their executive director, the ANCA will continue to assist in bringing this valuable rails-with-trails project to reality.

    Bikes Belong Coalition, the bicycle industry┬╣s advocacy voice, has contributed a $10,000 grant for this project.

    For more infor
  • Lancaster Heritage Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Lancaster Heritage Trail offers scenic views as it traverses the wooded Lancaster countryside. At each end, kiosks provide a brief history of the trail, which was built on a portion of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western railroad bed dating back to the late 1800s. The off-road, non-motorized pathway is paved and relatively level with three at-grade, well-marked street crossings. Benches made of natural materials, including boulders scattered alongside the trail, provide places to rest on the 4-mile journey.
  • Lehigh Memory Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.71 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Just east of Buffalo, New York, lies the Lehigh Memory Trail in the Village of Williamsville. The pathway is a short paved trail that runs through the heart of the village. The trail can get crowded with rollerbladers, so stay alert on the weekends.

    On the trail you will find the Williamsville Depot; this historic railroad depot was constructed in November 1896 by the Depew & Tonawanda Railroad, a subsidiary of the Lehigh Valley Railway. It is belived that the Williamsville Depot was the last station structure completed by the original Lehigh Valley Railway. Passenger service ended at the depot sometime in the early 1950's, but the freight agent manned the building until 1974.

    The building was sold to International Chimney in 1986 by Conrail and the Western New York Railway Historical Society (WNYRHS) acquired the station from them in 1990. The lands and right-of-way were acquired by the Village of Williamsville at the same time and a nearly 3/4 of a mile section of the right-of-way from South Long to Cayuga Streets has been converted into Lehigh Memory Trail. The WNYRHS leases the land that the station sits upon from the Village of Williamsville. The station is only one of three original mainline Lehigh Valley stations that still exist in New York State in their original locations.

    For more information please contact the Village of Williamsville at (716) 632-4120.
  • Lehigh Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 15.8 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Cinder, Dirt, Grass

    The Lehigh Valley Trail is part of a developing system of rail-trails in western New York. The segment from Victor to Rush offers nearly 16 miles of serene wooded and rural areas. Plus, it is literally expanding horizons for trail enthusiasts. The trail connects on the western end with the Genesee Valley Greenway and on the east end to the Auburn Trail. About midway, at Rochester Junction, the trail joins the Lehigh Valley Trail–North Branch. This developing trail will eventually connect to the Erie Canal Towpath about 5 miles to the north.

    Some call this gem of a rail-trail the Black Diamond Trail, which stems from the Lehigh Valley Railroad's nickname, "The Route of the Black Diamond." The railroad's 435-mile main line between Buffalo and New York City was used for hauling anthracite coal (black diamonds) from Pennsylvania.

    In Victor you can park just off Victor Mendon Road at the current eastern terminus of the trail. If you park a little farther west (at the Phillips Road Trailhead), you'll also have access to the Auburn Trail as well as the Seneca Trail. The Lehigh Valley Trail's newly decked trestle bridge is visible from the parking area; west of the bridge is the short connector to the Auburn Trail.

    Heading west, the Lehigh Valley Trail is a smooth, crushed-stone path. Equestrians are encouraged to preserve the trail surface by using the 5-foot grassy space that parallels the trail. This is the trail's most recently built section. You have open views of meadows and some industrial park buildings, but trees soon enclose the corridor.

    Around mile 1 you reach a smal

  • Lehigh Valley Trail - North Branch

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 14.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    The North Branch of the Lehigh Valley Trail connects the campuses of the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology. The trail’s northern terminus is where the Erie Canal Heritage Trail connects to the university’s parking lot, accessed by Intercampus Drive. From there, the trail uses a concrete-and-gravel bridge to cross I-390. A path continues 0.2 mile to East River Road.

    From East River Road to Brighton-Henrietta Town Line Road (1.5 mile) the trail is stone dust. Users must then use the sidewalk (concrete, 5-foot wide) of Brighton-Henrietta Town Line Road for 0.25 mile south and cross Jefferson Road at a controlled intersection with a push-button walk sign. South of Jefferson Road, the path is a paved asphalt multi-use path parallel to John Street for the remaining 1.5 mile. The multi-use path terminates at Bailey Road.

    Turn left onto Bailey Road and follow the small green “Lehigh Valley Trail” trail signs for 1 mile to Route 15/W. Henrietta Road. Turn right onto Route 15/W.Henrietta Road and travel 0.3 mile and make a left turn onto Calkins Road following the trail signs. Travel 1 mile on Calkins Road and make a right turn into Veterans Memorial Park (no park sign, across from the terminus of Hylan Drive). You will pick up the stone dust trail again; head south. The stone dust trail ends at Florendin Drive.

    Continue south on Florendin Drive 350 feet and cross Lehigh Station Road onto Nevins Road. Travel 0.5 mile to end of Nevins Road and the stone dust trail begins again and goes approximately 5 miles to the terminus at Rochester Junction, where you can connect to the rest of the Lehigh Valley Trail system.

  • Liberty Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    The Liberty Rail Trail extends about 2.5 miles through the village of Liberty, NY, between Chestnut Street/SR 52 (near West Street) and the old rail trestle in Ferndale. The trail occupies a portion of a former railroad corridor once owned by the O&W Rail Line. The route is mostly wooded, especially at the southern end, but does pass through the village center. Though short, the trail is divided into three distinct segments (all contiguous), each with their own character. Map boards at the end points guide you.

  • Maple City Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Maple City Trail offers a short, but scenic route through Ogdensburg in northern New York. It begins at the city's visitor center on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, which separates the state from Canada. From there, the paved trail heads south, hugging the Oswegatchie River on one side and a row of beautiful mature trees on the other.

  • Mosholu-Pelham Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 10.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Mosholu-Pelham Greenway connects several parks and recreational opportunities in New York City's north and central Bronx neighborhoods. A portion of the trail is also part of the growing East Coast Greenway, which will span 15 states from Florida to Maine.

    On the trail’s east end is Pelham Bay Park along Long Island Sound. Larger than Central Park, this outdoor gem offers hiking and equestrian trails, playgrounds, two golf courses, access to City Island and Orchard Beach, and many other amenities.

    As it makes its way across town, the trail follows scenic Pelham Parkway and, later, Mosholu Parkway to head northwest. It ends in Van Cortlandt Park, which is centered around a large lake. The park offers a golf course, athletic fields, playgrounds, a riding stable, museum, and nature center. You can enjoy more of the park’s beautiful scenery by following a short pathway around the south side of the lake and connecting to the Old Putnam Trail. That trail in turn connects to the South County Trailway outside of the park, heading north for nearly 15 miles.

  • North County Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 22.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The North County Trailway is the longest of the four connected rail-trails breathing new life into the former New York Central Railroad's Putnam Division line. The "Old Put" provided passenger and freight service between New York City and Brewster, in Putnam County, from the 1880s. Passenger service ended in 1958 and freight services ended in 1980.

    The trail spans 22.1 miles in Westchester County. From Mount Pleasant (where it becomes the South County Trailway on its southward trek to the New York City line) the trailway extends north to the Putnam County border, where it seamlessly transitions into the Putnam Trailway, rolling 9.7 miles north. From Old Saw Mill River Road at the North County Trailway's southern end, the trail runs parallel to the busy Saw Mill River Parkway on the right and woodlands and a power transmission corridor on the left.

    After crossing over Old Saw Mill River Road, there is a side trail on the left that leads down to a parking lot along the road. The trail then crosses State Route 117, Bedford Road, on a bridge. Highway traffic is never far away from this southern section of the trail, but a narrow strip of trees provides welcome shade and screening from the traffic.

    Just beyond Pleasantville Road is a side trail to the Tudor-style Briarcliff Library, formerly the Briarcliff Manor train station. Then you hit the first of two on-road detours: Saw Mill River Road, which parallels the trail corridor here, provides a wide shoulder for the short distance to Chappaqua Road, when the rail-trail returns and runs you through the woods between Saw Mill River Road and the Taconic State Parkway.

    Your second journey on the shoulder of Saw Mill River Road begins at the intersection of North State Road. This 0.75-mile detour takes you past Echo Lake State Park and over the Taconic State P
  • O & W Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 7.5 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Cinder, Dirt, Grass

    Three segments of the O&W Rail-Trail are open to the public within the Town of Fallsburg: Mountaindale to Woodridge, 2.7 miles; Woodridge toward South Fallsburg, 1.8 miles; South Fallsburg to Hurleyville), 3 miles. When complete, the trail will stretch 25 miles between the D&H Linear Park in Summitville to downtown Liberty.

    The Ontario & Western Railroad (O&W) opened the Scranton Division in 1888 and operated the line through northern Wayne County, into New York State at Hancock, until 1957. A major carrier of anthracite coal, the O&W was also an important carrier of milk and dairy products, as well as urban tourists seeking the fresh air of resorts and farm house boarding.

  • O&W Railroad Pedestrian Promenade and Bikeway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    This unique in-city trail was built on portions of the former Ontario and Western Railway Line through the City of Oswego. The Ontario and Western Railway ran its last train in March of 1957. The trail passes through a short tunnel, which was used by the now defunct railroad.

    Plans call for extending the trail along more of the abandoned right-of-way in the near future. The pedestrian promenade and bikeway is a joint project between the city and the county utilizing the former O&W Railroad tunnel.
  • Ocean Parkway Coastal Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 3.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Ocean Parkway Coastal Greenway, which opened in June 2014, runs just shy of 4 miles between Jones Beach State Park and Tobay Beach. Both beaches permit swimming and provide opportunities to purchase food and refreshments.

    The paved trail parallels the north side of Ocean Parkway (a guiderail and wide median separates users from traffic) and offers views of South Oyster Bay and the Atlantic Ocean along Long Island’s southern shore.

    From the trail’s western end, you can extend your journey on the Jones Beach Bikeway, which heads north to Cedar Creek Park.

  • Ocean Parkway Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Ocean Parkway Trail closely follows its eponymous thoroughfare nearly 5 miles through several Brooklyn neighborhoods, ending only a block from the popular Coney Island boardwalk. Those traveling with children will enjoy the many playgrounds just off the route: Brighton, Century, Grady and McDonald. However, parents should note that the trail crosses several busy intersections. A few blocks north of the Church Avenue trailhead, the Parade Grounds of Prospect Park offer additional recreational amenities with its baseball diamonds, soccer fields, basketball courts and football fields.
  • Old Croton Aqueduct Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 26.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Dirt

    The Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park follows the route of the Old Croton Aqueduct, which carried water to New York City from 1842 to 1955. Most of the structure lies beneath the trail and has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The aqueduct itself remains intact; the northern sections continue to supply water to Ossining.

    The trail offers an enjoyable, level, 26 miles from the New Croton Dam in northern Westchester to Van Cortlandt Park at the New York City line. While primarily a walking path, parts of the trail are suitable for horseback riding, biking and, in winter, cross-country skiing. Panoramas of the Hudson River are visible, particularly in Yonkers and Hastings.

    Many historic homes, two nature preserves and a museum in Ossining highlighting the construction of the Aqueduct are immediate neighbors. The trail passes through 11 communities, offering and is accessible uphill from Metro-North Hudson Line trains and bus services along Route 9. Cyclists should avoid the trail after heavy rains and during the mud season to reduce erosion.

  • Old Erie Path

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    These three contiguous trails—the Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail, Old Erie Path and Joseph B. Clark Trail—occupy the former right-of-way of the Erie Railroad's Nyack and Piermont Branch. Each trail is fairly short but taken together they make for a wonderful experience along the banks of the Hudson River.

    The 3-mile Old Erie Path has a rougher surface than its neighboring Esposito Trail, but is suitable for walking and for hybrid or mountain biking. In contrast to the prior mile along roads and homes, this path is more remote. The railroad bed was cut into the side of steep hills that drop into the Hudson River, so trail users have a spectacular view across the wide river. Homeowners, many of them high above or downhill from the corridor, access the trail by way of creative engineering: hillside stairways with handrails fashioned from the limbs of native trees, as well as decorative archways and gates on intricate pulley systems.

    In Piermont the trail curves west away from the river. Just before the trail crosses Hudson Terrace, you'll find the restored Piermont train station, which houses information on the area's railroad history. Then the Old Erie Path begins a 1-mile long, densely wooded, gentle descent into the town of Sparkill, where it meets the 2.8-mile Joseph B. Clark Trail.

  • Old Mine Railroad Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    Fahnestock State Park is a relatively undiscovered gems in the New York State Park System. Located a few miles east of Cold Spring Village on Rt. 301 (Main Street), the park jurisdiction was recently expanded to include almost 10,000 acres of undeveloped land with an extensive network of trails maintained by the state and the New York-New Jersey trail conference.

    Ridges running from southwest to northeast dominate the terrain. Between them are several lakes and ponds and numerous wetlands and streams. Although there are occasional steep sections, there are no long or difficult climbs, and for the most part grades are moderate.

    The network of trails in the park makes it possible to plan a great variety of outings, ranging from easy rambles for families with children to strenuous all day hikes. Pick up a box lunch and enjoy the back country experience less than 60 miles from one of the largest cities in the world. Just remember to pack out what you pack in so others may enjoy the unblemished scenery.

    Trails are blazed with round plastic discs of various colors or rectangular painted marks. A double blaze, one above the other, indicates a turn with the upper blaze offset in the direction of the turn. A triple blaze in a triangle pattern indicates the start or end of a trail.

    The trails are restricted to day use only. Camping or making fires is not permitted. No vehicles are permitted on any hiking trails. This includes mountain bikes as well as all terrain vehicles (ATVs), motorcycles and snowmobiles.

    NOTE: The part of the Old Mine Railroad Trail from the Appalachian Trail to the dam at Hidden Lake is now closed. The trail has been rerouted from the 3 Lakes Trail over the dam to connect with the remaining part of the trail. The dam at Hidden Lake will be repaired and raise the water level, possibly
    covering the now closed section.
  • Old Putnam Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.25 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Dirt, Grass

    Splayed over 1,146 acres in northwest Bronx, Van Cortlandt Park has a lot going on. The park is New York City's fourth largest and is home to the oldest municipal golf course in America. There are playgrounds, walking trails, running tracks, scores of ball fields, a nature center, a museum and scenic lake. Van Cortlandt Park also is home to the Old Putnam Trail, one of four rail-trails on the former New York Central Railroad's Putnam Division line. The wide dirt and grass corridor allows easy passage on foot or by mountain bike.

    Access the trail from the northwest corner of the large parking lot near the Van Cortlandt Golf House. Though a portion of rail corridor extends south from here, it is heavily overgrown. Head south from the entrance a short distance to see the remnants of an old passenger platform. All that remains is the rusted metal framework.

    The trail's best scenery and its most unusual sight are immediate. The trail skirts Van Cortlandt Lake and then passes 13 large stones along the west side of the corridor. Railroad baron Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt had these stone slabs shipped from quarries to determine which would be best (most impervious to weathering) for building Grand Central Station in New York City. Despite the results of his experiment, Indiana limestone was chosen because it was cheaper to transport. The Indiana limestone sample is the second southernmost stone in this lineup.

    As you continue north you pass several trails that connect to the John Kiernan Nature Trail. This 1.25-mile trail named for a Bronx naturalist meanders by Van Cortlandt Lake, a wetland and the forest. Staying on the Old Putnam Trail brings you over a small bridge spanning an arm of Van Cortlandt Lake. Across the lake are views of the Bronx skyline and the golf course clubhouse.

    At the Westchester County line, the Old Putnam Trail gives way to the South County Trailway<
  • Oneida Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The first mile of the nearly 12-mile planned Oneida Rail Trail opened in September 2014 between Hubbard Place and Lenox Avenue on the west side of Oneida. The trail runs through woodlands on an old corridor once used by the New York Central’s West Shore Railroad. A sign at the Hubbard Place trailhead celebrates the segment’s status as the first component of the future expansive network.

    When complete, the rail-trail system will use three former railroad corridors to provide access to much of the community, as well as a connection to the existing Erie Canalway Trail. A roughly 6-mile loop via the bisecting corridors will also provide a popular recreation route around the city.

  • Ongiara Trail System

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass

    Whirlpool State Park has two levels--the upper, or street level has many overlooks with spectacular views of the swirling waters of the rapids, the whirlpool and the Niagara River Escarpment. Visitors picnic and children use the playground at this level. The lower, or river level is accessible by walking the 300 feet of trails and steps that descend into the gorge. This level has several nature trails and access for fishing. Devil's Hole State Park overlooks the lower Whirlpool rapids. A wildly beautiful walkway leads down from the park along the turbulent Niagara River 300 feet into the wooded gorge and offers an up-close, spectacular view of the gorge's rapids. Devil's Hole has picnic areas, hiking, and nature trails. It is one of the most popular spots for fishermen.
  • Ontario Pathways Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 19 miles
    Surface: Cinder, Grass, Gravel

    Shaped like a left-leaning V, the Ontario Pathways Rail Trail travels southwest from Canandaigua to Stanley, then shoots north to Clifton Springs. The rural trail is the pride of an industrious community organization, Ontario Pathways, Inc., that purchased the unused railroad corridor and transformed it into a popular recreation destination. Nineteen miles of the rail-trail are open, and ten of twelve bridges have been redecked or rebuilt. One of the bridges at the Canandaigua end is enhanced with a decorative metal gate in the shape of the organization's logo and name. A similar gate is in place in Clifton Springs.

    For the first few miles in Canandaigua, an active rail line is separated from the trail by a thick, overgrown hedgerow. The trail's surface is single track, occasionally wider, of packed cinder ballast bordered by mowed grass and trees.

    It's a wonderfully pleasant ride through the vast agricultural landscape of the Finger Lakes region, passing acres and acres of green cabbage, red cabbage, squash, celery, soybeans and corn. If you ride the trail often enough, you will witness the full cycle of America's produce being grown and harvested.

    At the Orleans trailhead, along County Road 23, is a railroad water tower. The wooden tank, which held 40,000 gallons, is one of a few of the remaining towers that serviced steam locomotives throughout the Northeast.

    At this point there is a break in the trail that requires on-road navigation to reach the last section of rail-trail north of Clifton Springs. It is worth the extra effort to enjoy the northernmost segment's beautiful waterfalls and nicely constructed bridges.

    Be sure to budget enough time to explore the quaint town of Canandaigua, perched on the north shore of Canandaigua Lake, one of the smaller of New York's Finger Lakes. With loads of Victorian architecture and a population of fewer than 15,000, Canandaigua has the essence of a tiny resort town. From June through O
  • Oswego County Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 28 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    The Oswego County Trail follows an abandoned right-of-way of the old New York Ontario & Western Railroad between Cleveland and Fulton. The trail passes among scenic countryside on a sometimes rough surface. Many of the railroad bridges have been preserved and resurfaced as crossings. ATVs and snowmobiles use the trail, as do mountain bikers and hikers.

    The trail is actually in two segments, divided by Interstate 81 in the village of Central Square. From Maple Avenue the Fulton side runs for about 10 miles to just west of I-81, while the Cleveland side runs about 16 miles to Hallenbeck Road.

    To navigate around I-81 heading eastbound, go north on US 11, west on SR 49 (East Ave.), and south on CR 37 (Swamp Rd.). Look for the trail access again on the left. To navigate around I-81 westbound, go north on CR 37 (Swamp Rd.), east on SR 49 (East Ave.), then south on US 11. Look for the trail access on the right, past the Post Office.

  • Painted Post Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    If you are near Corning, New York, and need a nice walk, check out this charming respite. The Painted Post Trail connects schools, playgrounds, other trails and residential neighborhoods west of Corning. The wide right-of-way (nearly 100 feet) accommodates the trail's interesting design: instead of following the straight line of the railroad track, the trail gently weaves through a grassy park setting.

    The trail begins just past the community swimming pool in Craig Park, named for former village Mayor Charles Craig. The park has basketball and tennis courts, a sand volleyball court, a skateboard park and numerous picnic tables and grills. The rail-trail passes some homes before shooting through an underpass of the combination Victory Highway and New York Route 415.

    A restored railroad depot sits along the trail near Steuben Street. It serves as a railroad museum staffed by volunteers. After crossing Steuben Street the trail skirts the High Street Cemetery. A bridge takes you over a small creek, then the trail goes under Interstate 86 and ends at the intersection of Western Lane and Cutler Avenue.

    The Painted Post Trail is a vital part of the community. Many events are held along the trail throughout the year, including the well-known Wine Glass Marathon, which has been taking place for several decades.

  • Parksville Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.2 miles
    Surface: Cinder

    This rustic unpaved trail, just over three miles in length, runs along a route formerly used by the New York, Ontario, & Western Railway's Main Line through Parksville in Sullivan County, NY. The trail is identified on some web-based interactive map programs (e.g., yahoo and mapquest) as "Old Railroad Grade."

    Plans call for extending the Parksville Rail Trail south to the Village of Liberty, NY, at some point in the near future. However, construction is not yet under way nor has funding been allocated.

    Please stop by charming downtown Parksville during your visit to our area. We especially welcome equestrian trail users visiting from areas near or far from Sullivan County.
  • Pat McGee Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 12.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Grass

    Make way for diversity on the Pat McGee Trail. This 12.1-mile path boasts a diverse array of plant and animal life, with more than 150 species of bird. A variety of users, including snowmobilers and equestrians, can be seen. The trail even crosses the eastern Continental Divide, meaning that the rainfall on one end of the trail is diverted to the Atlantic Ocean and on the other end to the Gulf of Mexico.

    The trail connects seven quiet communities in the heart of Cattaraugus County in southwest New York. If you begin your journey at the northern trailhead just south of Cattaraugus, be prepared for a climb. The grade is gentle but you will know you are going uphill. Not far from the trailhead is a lean-to. Snowmobile riders huddle here in winter months, and in summer it provides relief from sudden storms. The rail-trail's first several miles pass mostly through woodland, as you climb toward the eastern Continental Divide. Informational signs chronicle the wide assortment of mammals (41 species) and plants (174 species), as well as describe geological features and 9 unique ecosystems. In spring the woods abound with wildflowers. Keep an eye out for white-tailed deer and other wildlife on the trail ahead.

    After passing the Continental Divide, the trail begins a slight descent and the landscape changes to wetlands. There is agricultural activity here, too, signaling the rural nature of the communities woven together by this old rail line.

    In the village of Little Valley, about midway on your journey, a community recreational park has pavilions and picnic tables. Didn't pack your picnic lunch? Head a block or two into the village, where shops and eateries welcome trail visitors. A short paved section of trail leads from the park southward.

    Other trails cross and branch off of the Pat McGee Trail. These trails are used by snowmobilers, hikers and equestrians. The North Country National Scenic Trail, Bicentennial Bike Trail and the Finger Lake
  • Philip A. Rayhill Memorial Recreational Trail (NH&W Rail Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Philip A. Rayhill Memorial Recreational Trail is part of the New Hartford & Whitestown Rail Trail system (NH & W). The 4-mile asphalt trail links the two towns and roughly parallels Route 840 (Judd Road).

  • Pittsford Trail System (Railroad Loop Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 11.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete, Crushed Stone

    The Pittsford Trail System, also called the Railroad Loop Trail, provides access to the Erie Canal, town of Pittsford, and shopping and business district in the quaint New York village. A short segment follows part of the Erie Canalway Trail. Most of the Pittsford Trail, however, passes through a wooded corridor behind tidy suburban back yards and provides access to the Pittsford Shopping Plaza.

  • Putnam Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The final passenger cars of the Putnam Division of the New York Central Railroad ran in 1958, but the rail line that so influenced development of this area still sparks nostalgia. The "Old Put" carried commuters from New York City north to Brewster, where connections took travelers to Boston and Montreal. Freight service for farm products from rural areas of Putnam and Westchester counties continued until the 1980s.

    Nearly 45 miles of the Old Put corridor, from Van Cortlandt Park in New York City north to Putnam County, have been converted into four connecting rail-trails. The Putnam Trailway is the northernmost of the trails atop the train line. Currently 11 miles are open for public use from the Putnam County line at Baldwin Place, where Westchester County's North County Trailway terminates, to Putnam Avenue in Brewster.

    North from Baldwin Place is a gentle uphill slope. Busy Route 6 is just to the west, and a residential development flanks the east side of the trail. As you briefly enter a wooded area, Bloomer Pond appears on your right. Bucks Hollow Road runs adjacent to the trail here, providing several access points. The hamlet of Mahopac provides additional opportunities to access the trail.

    Past Croton Falls Road the trail enters a mixed hardwood forest for the 1.7 miles to Lake Casse. The woods are busy with squirrels and chipmunks foraging for food and shelter. Many bird species live in these woods; their calls can be heard throughout the day.

    To take in the view at Lake Casse, hop off the trail at Lake Road. After Lake Casse, the rail-trail descends and plunges into a dense forest. On the outskirts of the hamlet of Carmel, the trail runs along Route 6 again with the south bank of Lake Gleneida on the far side of the road. Swimming is prohibited because the lake is a municipal water supply. But in winter warmly dressed anglers cluster around their ice-fis
  • Quarry Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.1 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Grass

    The Quarry Trail is currently a 600-foot long unimproved strip of land along what is known as Quarry Road in the Village of Hastings-on-Hudson, NY. The trail links Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park and Hastings-on-Hudson trails. Access it from Aqueduct Lane between Hogan Place and Division Street.

  • Railroad Run

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Railroad Run trail runs for just a half mile between West Circular Street and Congress Avenue in Saratoga Springs. The trail is part of a growing network throughout the town and county. There are plans to extend the trail south to West Avenue then across State Route 50 to Saratoga Spa State Park, eventually linking with the Saratoga Heritage Trail Network and the Zim Smith Trail.

  • PROJECT: Ramapo River Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.88 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This project will convert an abandoned railroad spur from the New York State/New Jersey line to an existing bike/pedestrian trail along the Ramapo River as part of a larger trailway system.

    The trail corridor is located in the western end of Rockland County at the base of the Ramapo Mountains. The trail will extend approximately two miles, beginning in the Village of Hillburn at the NY-NJ border, passing through the Village of Suffern and ending at Route 59 two miles north back in the Village of Hillburn.

    The proposed trail will be ten-feet wide and have an asphalt surface with 2-foot shoulders on each side. It will be ADA accessible for wheelchair users and will accommodate bicycles, pedestrians, joggers, in-line skaters, nature study and hikers.

    Key spots along the river would be cleared in order to improve accessibility to the river for anglers and canoeists and provide sitting areas for trail users to view attractive sections of the river, dams and historical sites.

    The trail would provide access to the Villages of Suffern and Hillburn. In Suffern, trail users could patronize the various shops and restaurants in the village, which could help increase economic activity and create new trail-related businesses.

    Improvement of the trail will open attractive vistas of the Ramapo River with its abundance of aquatic wildlife, birds and fauna. A treasured view that can be seen from various parts of the future trail's corridor is the Torne Valley, including the majestic Torne Mountain, which is surrounded by 1,500+ acres of rolling hills (the Ramapo Mountains) and is surrounded by Harriman State Park on three sides. The entire corridor runs along the Ramapo Mountains and many scenic areas exist along the way.

    CURRENT PROJECT STATUS: Funding has been approved and received; however, negotiations with propery owners for trail easements are still in progress. Construction is expected to begin in the Fall of 2002.
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  • Raymond G. Esposito Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    These three contiguous trails—the Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail, Old Erie Path and Joseph B. Clark Trail—occupy the former right-of-way of the Erie Railroad's Nyack and Piermont Branch. Each trail is fairly short but taken together they make for a wonderful experience along the banks of the Hudson River.

    The Raymond G. Esposito Memorial Trail in South Nyack, named for a late mayor of this village, is a 1-mile-long, gravel trail through several neighborhoods on the Hudson River. From its start in a community park, the rail-trail heads south, occasionally high above some of the neighborhoods it passes. Extensive stairways on the steep slopes have been constructed to connect residents with the rail-trail.

    The trail runs parallel to South Franklin Street crossing Brookside and Clinton avenues. These are low-traffic-volume residential roads, but trail users should stop at each intersection before proceeding. The trail crosses over the New York State Thruway on the original railroad bridge, redecked for trail use. By the time you touch down on the far side of the highway, at South Broadway Avenue, the Esposito Trail ends and the Old Erie Path begins.

  • Ridgeway Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.3 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt, Gravel

    The Ridgeway Trail skirts the banks of Willseyville Creek along the abandoned rail bed of the Delaware & Lackawanna Railroad and the former Lehigh Valley Railroad. From south Willseyville the trail heads north into Tomkins County and ends at Ridgeway Road. The level trail is used by mountain bikers and hikers, and snowmobiles are permitted in winter. Follow the white blazes since many side trails cross the Ridgeway Trail.

  • Rivergate Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 30.2 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    Note: The Rivergate trail is closed from Theresa to English Settlement Road because of a washout. Contact the Rivergate Wheelers for updated information.

    The Rivergate Trail, also called the Sissy Danforth Rivergate Trail, stretches from Acheson's Crossing at State Route 11 in Philadelphia, New York, west to Clayton. A second spur runs north from Theresa to Redwood. The trail occupies the former Penn Central Railroad and is also popular with ATVs and snowmobiles.

    The 30-mile Rivergate Trail traverses farmland and forest and is maintained by several local ATV clubs, as well as the Thousand Islands Land Trust.

  • Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.5 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    The town of Perinton, New York, has been hard at work improving the Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern Trail, and it shows. Since 1996, when the American Hiking Society designated Perinton as a Trail Town USA, the trail has a new connection with the town hall and its surrounding park facilities, and there is a state-of-the-art road crossing at busy Route 31. Even the crushed limestone surface is in great shape.

    The rail-trail connects with the town's Crescent Trail footpath system and now, thanks to a new pedestrian/bicycle bridge over the canal built by the town of Fairport, also connects directly with the Erie Canal Heritage Trail.

    The trail is also known locally as the RS&E Trail, the Perinton Hike-Bikeway, or the Trolley Trail, for the electric trolley that ran on the corridor. Whatever name you use, the trail provides an excellent spot for a walk or bike ride.

    It's probably best to start your adventure at Egypt Park on the corner of Route 31 and Victor Road. From the southwest corner of the parking lot, follow a short connecting path to the trail. Turn right onto the rail-trail but look left to see the horses and other animals of Lollypop Farms, the large Human Society branch of Monroe and Rochester counties. If you have time at the end of the trip, visit their education center, hands-on outdoor pens or even the adoption center. From Egypt Park, the trail heads both east and west; east where it dead-ends (for now) at Pannell Road and west toward Fairport.

    Heading west from Egypt Park, the trail crosses Route 31. At the far side of the busy road, the trail continues on the left. You may notice the power lines overhead. The Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern Trail is one of the many rail-trails—nearly 40 percent—that pulls double duty as a recreation and transportation corridor and a utili

  • Samuel G. Fisher Mount Ivy Environmental Park

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Cinder, Dirt, Grass, Woodchips

    A former right-of-way of the NY & NJ Railroad.

    Near historical Mount Ivy which was the center of a Quaker settlement in the 18th century.

    Hiking along railroad bed and wildlife observation and wetland ecology.
  • Saranac Lake Recreational Path

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 0.52 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    The Saranac Lake Recreational Path is a .52 mile rail with trail in the village of Saranac Lake. The path begins at Brandy Brook Avenue on the south side of the rail corridor that is used by the Adirondack Scenic Railroad which runs between Lake Placid and Saranac Lake. Surface of the path is primarily dirt and it is separated from the active railroad by a chain link fence. The path shares a short segment of a dirt road on the northern perimeter of Pine Ridge Cemetery and Fawn Street before crossing Pine Street and proceeding on the north side of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad corridor. The Recreational Path climbs slightly to pass under East Pine Street and then descends back to the grade of the railroad. The path ends at another intersection with Pine Street. There is limited on street parking on Dugway at the Herb Garden and at the end of Stevenson Lane at Triangle Park.
  • Seneca Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 6.1 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    Once used by the Seneca indians, this trail traverses glacial formations, open fields, farmland, wooded wetlands and the Auburn Trail. The degree of difficulty varies from flat and easy to steep and hilly. The trail can be wet and muddy in some sections.

    Valentown Hall, located at the north end of the trail, is a three story wooden building that was built in the 1870's for a train that never came. The museum is open on weekends and by appointment. At the south end of the trail is Ganondagan State Historic Site, once a thriving Seneca village. Learn how the Seneca lived in this area in the 1600's and see a replica of a longhouse.
  • Shawangunk, Walden, and Wallkill Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 4.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Cinder, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    Shawangunk, Walden, and Wallkill Rail Trail is built on a railroad right-of-way that was abandoned by Conrail in the late 1970s. Conrail and its predecessors, Penn Central, New York Central, and The Wallkill Valley Railway, provided service to farmers along the route from Montgomery to Kingston by transporting their goods to wholesale markets in New York City.

    The rail-trail is currently open in two disconnected sections. The longer, southern section is paved and stretches about 3 miles from Woodruff Street in Walden to Route 208 in Wallkill.

    A shorter section begins in Wallkill and heads north for just under 2 miles. It remains unpaved and favored by mountain bikers and horseback riders. From its northern end, trail users may connect to the scenic Wallkill Valley Rail-Trail by taking an on-road route to Denniston Road, where it begins.

  • Shore Parkway Greenway Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 12.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Shore Parkway Greenway Trail is comprised of two disconnected segments along the New York Harbor that together offer more than 12 miles of paved pathway on Brooklyn's southern border. Between the two segments sits Coney Island, well-known for its amusement parks and sandy beaches.

    Originally built in the 1940s, the trail has received many improvements in recent years to repair its aging, pockmarked surface, reinforce the seawall and beautify the walkway with trees.

    The western segment of the trail begins in Owl's Head Park, a pretty hillside area offering a playground, skate ramps and restrooms. The park is a nice place to watch the sunset and enjoy views of the skyline and the majestic Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. From there, the trail closely traces Shore Parkway along the waterfront and ends at Bensonhurst Park, which sports a picturesque promenade on Gravesend Bay.

    The eastern portion begins near the intersection of Emmons Avenue and Brigham Street. From there, the trail goes east along Shore Parkway and soon enters Brooklyn Marine Park, a wildlife preserve with grassland and salt marsh habitats. After crossing the Mill Basin Bridge, the trail continues past the McGuire Fields ballparks, Canarsie Park and the Canarsie Pier, a popular fishing and picnicking spot. The trail ends in Queens, shortly after passing through the Gateway National Recreation Area, a wetlands preserve and natural treasure for bird watching, hiking, biking and water sports.
  • South County Trailway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 14.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The South County Trailway is a zippy paved trail heading north from Yonkers through the Hudson River Valley communities of Hastings-on-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Ardsley, Irvington, Greenburgh, and Elmsford. Popular with bike commuters seeking relief from the area's busy streets and parkways, the trail follows the former Putnam Division line ("Old Put") of the New York Central Railroad and links two other rail-trails on the same line: the Old Putnam Trail in the south and the North County Trailway in Mount Pleasant.

    The trail begins at the border of Westchester County and New York City, just outside Van Cortlandt Park. However, there is no trail access at this location. You must approach either from the Old Putnam Trail out of Van Cortlandt Park or by proceeding south from Redmond Park.

    North from HF Redmond Jr. Memorial Park, a new section of trail was completed in October 2011. Carry on slightly uphill from the park entrance to the intersection at Mile Square Road then cross the Palmer Road bridge. Just north of that is an observation point that offers views of north Yonkers.

    The next 7.5 miles are smooth sailing; the trail passes through mixed residential and commercial areas and parallels the Saw Mill River Parkway. Through V. Everit Macy Park the trail runs between the parkway and the New York Thruway. Though the majority is bordered by a fencerow of deciduous trees and brush, you are seldom far from traffic noise. The numerous side road crossings are well signed, but be alert at all crossings both for motorists and cyclists.

    The official endpoint of the South County Trailway, and the start of the 22-mile North County Trailway, is where the corridor crosses Old Saw Mill River Road. If you want to extend, or even double, your mileage, cross the road and make tracks on the line where the Old Put ra

  • South Hill Recreation Way

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    The South Hill Recreation Way follows the southern rim of the Six Mile Creek gorge from the outskirts of southeast Ithaca to Burns Road, near the Ithaca Reservoir. The gravel path follows the former grade of the Cayuga and Susquehanna, built in 1849 to haul coal from Pennsylvania to a canal in Ithaca. The rail later merged with the Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad, abandoned in 1957. The trail was developed in 1986 as an Environmental Quality Bond Act Project.

    Today the trail meanders through a combination of residential neighborhoods, meadows and woodlands, crossing several deep ravines and offering scenic views across the Six Mile Creek valley. Part of the route passes through the Mulholland Wildflower Preserve and Vincenzo Iacovelli Park, providing access to those sites and the Six Mile Creek gorge itself. Hiking paths lead off the biking trail into the gorge.

    Two trailheads are on TCAT public bus routes.

  • Spring Run Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Currently, the 1-mile Spring Run Trail extends between East Street just south of Excelsior Avenue and I-87, or the Northway, near Exit 15. Eventually, the trail will begin in Congress Park and run along city streets through High Rock Park to Warren Street. There are also plans to tunnel beneath the Northway so that the trail can carry on to the ice rinks and soccer fields on Weibel Avenue and eventually out to Bog Meadow Brook Nature Trail.

    Though short, the trail is a pleasant jaunt along an old railroad bed by Spring Run, passing among wetlands and wooded tracts.

  • Staten Island Greenbelt Multi-Purpose Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.6 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone

    Several trails are found throughout Staten Island's Greenbelt system of trails but only one allows both cyclists and walkers, the Staten Island Greenbelt Multi-Purpose Trail. At 2.6 miles, the crushed gravel trail offers a nice jaunt for joggers, walkers and cyclists alike. The path is 6 feet wide and runs from Rockland Avenue to Richmond Avenue, following along the perimeter of LaTourette golf course and paralleling Forest Hill Road.

    Bicycles are prohibited on the other trails in the system, so if you're cycling, be sure not to venture out on the yellow or blue trails, both of which intersect the Multi-Purpose Trail. The trail branches in two directions, one toward Richmond Avenue and the other toward Historic Richmond Town and the St. Andrews Church at Old Mill Road.

  • Tallman Mountain State Park Bike Path

    State: NY
    Length: 2.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Dirt

    Tallman Mountain State Park Bike Path is partially paved and bisects the Tallman Mountain State Park. The route provides a motor-vehicle-free way for bicyclists using US Route 9W to connect with downtown Piermont, New York. The park itself is heavily wooded on the easterly slope of the Palisades uplands and overlooks Hudson and Piermont Marsh (between the river and the slope).

  • Tannersville Bike Path (Huckleberry Multi-Use Trail)

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 2.7 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel

    For family riding and walking, the Tannersville Bike Path offers a 2.7 mile stretch of graded dirt path starting on Clum Hill Road directly across from Cortina Valley. The opposite end is on Bloomer Road. In the middle of the path is Tannersville Lake, a village park that is open to the public.

    The Bike Path follows the bed of the old Huckleberry Railroad which ran from the Catskill Mountain House west through Stamford. Plans are in the works to extend the Bike Path to the village of Hunter.

    For more information, please call the Village of Tannersville at 518-589-5850.

    Motorized vehicles please are not allowed on the Bike Path.
  • Terry Gordon Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This multi-use community trail is a hit with locals, and it appeals to visitors—especially those with a yen for military history. Plattsburgh, New York, has figured in this country's war history from the American Revolution and the War of 1812 to the Cold War.

    The Terry Gordon Trail (a.k.a. the Terry James Gordon Recreational Path) is part of Plattsburgh's developing network of on- and off-street bike routes and a river walk. Built adjacent to the Canadian Pacific Railway's still active main line along Lake Champlain, this rail-with-trail begins with a magnificent view of the lake and the Green Mountains of Vermont in the distance. Near the start, a stone monument dedicates the trail to Terry James Gordon, CITY COUNCILOR, COURT CLERK, HISTORIAN, RUNNER.

    Traveling south, you'll be tantalized by glimpses of sparkling Lake Champlain to your left, while on your right you have a clear view of the community. Watch for the buildings of the U.S. Oval National Historic District, formerly Plattsburgh Air Force Base, which closed in 1995. The brick dwellings that once housed high-ranking officers are now private homes. At mile 0.9 you'll see the old stone U.S. Armed Forces Barracks, built in 1820. Ulysses S. Grant lived in one of these while stationed here as an army lieutenant. Just beyond, an overpass connects to the lakefront and a fishing pier.

    At trail's end you can return the way you came. Or, better yet, vary your route by following bike route signs north, mostly off-road and along U.S. Route 9, to Clyde Lewis Park. You'll see an old cemetery that is well worth exploring, signs for the War of 1812 Museum and the venerable barracks from a different vantage point. Then cross the park to pick up the rail-with-trail and return to your starting point.

    To make a day of it, get your hands on a map of Plattsburgh's connecting bike routes and historic attractions. Contact the

    Timp-Torne Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 6.5 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    Just an hour north of New York City, the Timp-Torne Trail offers a scenic hike through Bear Mountain and Harriman State Parks with panoramic vistas of the Hudson River. The rugged blue-blazed trail travels along Dunderberg Mountain, The Timp summit, West Mountain and the steep rockface of Popolopen Torne. The trail is mostly wooded, so look for deer and other wildlife. Along the way, you'll also enjoy a mix of modern views (the Manhattan skyline) and historic sites: two tunnels and several rail beds from the Dunderberg Spiral Railway, which started construction in 1890, but was never completed.
  • Two Mile Creek Greenway

    State: NY
    Length: 1.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Two Mile Creek Greenway runs from East Park Drive near I-290 to the Niagara River in the town of Tonawanda. The trail follows along Two Mile Creek, passing through Veterans Memorial Park, and ends at a connection with a section of the Erie Canalway Trail (known as the Riverwalk), a vast trail network stretching more than 300 miles from Buffalo to Albany.

  • Uncle Sam Bikeway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Inland and east of the Hudson River, the Uncle Sam Bike Trail (also called the Uncle Sam Trail or Uncle Sam Bikeway) largely serves as a trail for residents of Troy. If, however, you are traveling in the area and want to stretch your legs, this trail offers a scenic retreat. It is also part of the extensive network of trails and on-road bike routes in the area. All of these appear on the Mohawk-Hudson Bike-Hike Trail map, free from the Capital District Transportation Authority.

    For convenient parking and less urban congestion, begin at the north end on Route 142. From here the trail is quickly enclosed in a canopy formed by a variety of trees, including oak, aspen, maple and cottonwood. Through the trees on your right you have a bird's-eye view of a suburban neighborhood. On your left rises a wooded hillside that forms a forest backdrop for virtually the length of the path, except where the trail crosses roads. Enjoy this verdant interlude but don't forget to watch the trail—it is considerably eroded in some places, and farther south the pavement is occasionally uneven.

    About halfway, your glimpses of Troy become more urban. At mile 1.7 you pass the buildings and athletic field of the large Lansingburgh High School. A granite obelisk near the trail marks Knickerbocker Park's memorial playgrounds, a good spot for taking a break to enjoy the sweeping view of the valley beyond.

    The Uncle Sam Bikeway follows the corridor of the Boston & Maine Railroad. The B&M brought passenger traffic and a lesser amount of freight traffic to Troy, where travelers could connect with the New York Central and the Delaware & Hudson Railway. Troy was also home to Samuel Wilson, who supplied upstate New York troops with meat during the War of 1812. The story goes that provisions came in barrels stamped "U.S." and soldiers joked that it stood for "Uncle Sam." The name came to stand for
  • Verona Beach State Park Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 8 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Grass

    Verona Beach State Park is located on the eastern shore of Oneida Lake. Shaded picnic areas and the campground are adjacent to the beach with an excellent view of the water. The lake, Black Creek, cattail marshes, and bottomland hardwood swamps give Verona Beach one of the most diverse aquatic habitats in the Central Region, and well worth a hike on the "Woods and Wetland" nature trail. The eastern portion of the park is open for hunting deer, small game, and waterfowl, in season.
  • Vestal Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 3.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Vestal Rail Trail runs for nearly four miles through the town of Vestal along an abandoned right-of-way once used by the Delaware–Lackawana & Western Railroad. Today, the 12-foot-wide trail is paved for bicyclists, inline skaters, and wheelchair users (the trail is fully ADA accessible). An 8-foot-wide unpaved surface runs adjacent to the trail for walkers and joggers.

    On its eastern end, the trail offers access to the sprawling shopping and dining complex of Town Square Mall. As it heads west, the pathway parallels Vestal Parkway, but a thick barrier of trees shields trail-goers from the noise and sight of traffic.

  • Walkway Over The Hudson

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 1.28 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    Built in 1888 to link New York and New England to the coal beds of Pennsylvania and the West, the steel-truss Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge was the longest bridge in the world for a spell, stretching 6,768 feet (approximately 1.28 miles) over the Hudson River. A 1974 blaze, blamed on sparks from a passing train, damaged only 700 feet of the span's wooden decking. Repair, however, was too pricey for the bankrupt railroad company that owned the structure, and tearing it down would have been far more expensive. Instead they permanently halted railroad operations over it.

    Today the bridge is the Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park. The bridge deck is 212 feet above the Hudson River and provides spectacular views both upstream and down. Expanding 24 feet over land to 35 feet over the water, the deck used to fit a pair of railroad tracks. Now it sees a steady flow of walkers, joggers, skaters and bicyclists who drink in this new view, which opened to the public in late 2009.

    It will one day be a linchpin in a 27-mile corridor of rail-trails and riverfront parks already built or planned in Ulster and Dutchess counties. The Hudson Valley Rail Trail's final mile in Highland connects to the bridge's east end. In Poughkeepsie, the Dutchess Rail Trail connects to the bridge at Parker Avenue and extends southeast for 13 miles.

    The Walkway Over the Hudson started with a group of like-minded locals. In 1992 they formed an advocacy organization devoted to converting the bridge into a public walkway. About 15 years later, they had funding in place and the state was on board to manage and maintain the park. Construction was a considerable undertaking. The entire structure, including underwater piers, had to be assessed for stability. Existing railroad structures, suc

  • Wallkill Valley Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 21.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Cinder, Gravel

    The Wallkill Valley Rail Trail extends more than 20 miles between Kingston and Gardiner along the route of the old Wallkill Valley Railroad, which, in the late 1800s, carried produce from Ulster County farms to New York City, as well as passengers through the Hudson Valley.

    The northern section of the trail, stretching 11.5 miles from the Town of Ulster (near the Kingston city line) to Rosendale, opened in June 2013. In Rosendale, you will come to the trail's most stunning attraction, the Rosendale Trestle, which stands 150 feet above Rondout Creek. The newly restored 940-foot-long bridge is more than 100 years old.

    As you continue south, you'll enjoy the surrounding views of hillsides, wetlands, forests and fields. Just after you cross Springtown Road, you'll see another fine example of a steel-truss bridge over placid Wallkill River. South of the bridge, a viewing platform with benches off of the trail encourages enjoyment of the wetland wildlife.

    For almost 0.25 mile between Plains Road and Broadhead Avenue in New Paltz, the trail is asphalt. In New Paltz, the trail is adjacent to Huguenot Street, a National Historic Landmark District. At the intersection of the trail and Main Street in New Paltz, a great restaurant occupies the restored former train station. There are shops and additional eateries in New Paltz to tempt trail users.

    South of New Paltz, the trail surface returns to gravel and is a little rougher, but before you leave the outskirts of New Paltz, the trail gives you direct access to the Wallkill. The thick tree stand and cool water offer a refreshing dip on a hot summer day. Much of the next 5 miles pass through agricultural landscape and wetlands. The hedges lining the trail can grow high and thick, but every now and then a view of a small farm or field opens up. The trail ends suddenly at Denniston Road at the Gardiner and Shawangunk town line, but it's more convenient to load bikes in the hamlet of G

  • Warren County Bikeway

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 10 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This trail is as smart as it is pretty. Signs that detail the area's history and appealing destinations accompany a scenic ride from Glens Falls into the resort town of Lake George, New York. Traveling by bicycle in either direction, you can stretch your legs with some climbing. Begin in Glens Falls to take advantage of a more gradual ascent and the reward of a swim at Lake George Beach.

    The trail's south end at Platt Street in Glens Falls does not have designated parking, so leave your car at the Leonard Street trailhead. Then, to say you rode the entire trail, follow the bikeway signs south on Leonard Street a couple of blocks, watching for where the trail picks up on your left.

    You will see several 19th-century industrial buildings along the trail, and the tracks of the Delaware and Hudson Railway (D&H) are visible on the far side of Platt Street. The D & H took passengers all the way from New York City through Glens Falls to the resort town then known as Caldwell (now Lake George). Today much of the bike path follows that route.

    Return to the Leonard Street trailhead and follow the trail, heading west and north through a residential and light-industrial area. Less than 1 mile ahead, the trailside Coopers Cave Ale Company has a bike rack and picnic tables, if you hanker for a gourmet soda or handmade ice cream. As you near Queensbury, trees green the trail, and at mile 2.2 you cross the beautiful pedestrian bridge over Quaker Road and Halfway Brook. After another trailside ice cream opportunity, at Sprinkles, the trail becomes wooded. You just might see a fox cross the trail.

    At about mile 3.3 you will leave the trail for 1.5 miles. The well-marked detour takes roads past large homes and the Glens Falls Country Club. The surroundings become more forested as you return to the bike trail. Then views of glittery Glen Lake, considered an idyllic fishing spot, reward your climbing efforts. As you cross a bridge over the lake's feeder stre
  • William R. Steinhaus Dutchess County Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 13 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Dutchess Rail Trail is a local treasure in the Hudson Valley region of New York, and for good reason: the 13-mile trail runs through what seems like a perpetually green landscape of dense tree cover, linking Poughkeepsie at the Hudson River with smaller towns to its southeast. The entire length of the trail, including the filling in of two significant gaps, was completed in October 2013. Now, a massive bridge—entirely funded by the New York Department of Transportation—spans busy State Route 55, Old Manchester Road and Wappinger Creek in the town of LaGrange.

    In the north, the Dutchess Rail Trail begins at a shared parking lot with the Walkway Over The Hudson off Parker Avenue/State Route 9G in Poughkeepsie. The stunning converted railroad trestle takes trail users over the Hudson River and leads directly to the Hudson Valley Rail Trail in Ulster County. All told, a trip on the three trails is a combined 18 miles one-way.

    Traveling east from Poughkeepsie utilizes a newer section of the Dutchess Rail Trail, completed in September 2013. This portion passes a large golf course and Morgan Lake Park. The park was the former western terminus of the trail and is a popular spot for fishing. After Morgan Lake, the trail begins to turn south, running through the communities of Arlington and LaGrange, and skirting the eastern edge of Red Oak Mills. This section includes the colossal bridge over SR 55, but the entire length of the trail features a mixture of new bridges and converted railroad trestles and tunnels.

    After winding through the towns of Wappinger and East Fishkill, the trail ends in the southeast just past the restored Hopewell Depot in Hopewell Junction. The museum that now occupies the former train station is well worth a visit, with a small photo gallery and plenty of inform

  • Zim Smith Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: NY
    Length: 7.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone, Dirt

    Considered "the backbone" of an emerging network of trails in Saratoga County, the Zim Smith Trail, sometimes called the Zim Smith Mid-County Trail, connects the towns of Halfmoon, Round Lake Village, Clifton Park, Malta and Ballston Spa.

    The best place to start is at Malta's Shenantaha Creek Park, about 2.75 miles south of the northern terminus. The park offers convenient access to the rail-trail and is an appealing destination in its own right. The park's picnic tables, playground equipment, tennis courts and volleyball net could turn an exercise session into a full afternoon's outing. here are also public toilets and a drinking fountain.

    As you enter the trail from the parking lot, turn left to head toward the village of Round Lake and Halfmoon. The rail-trail is, for the most part, wooded with a few homes visible beyond the trees as you leave the park. The trail rolls gently downhill, with pretty views into a ravine to your left, and a slope rising to your right.

    About 1 mile south of the park, the trail passes under Interstate 87, the Adirondack Northway. Nearing Round Lake, the trail is more settled, and you can see backyards and horse pastures through the trees.

    A handsome white frame church, other period buildings and a welcome sign signal your arrival in Round Lake Village. Treat yourself to a spin around the quiet streets of this Victorian hamlet and its ornate gingerbread cottages. The village was a Methodist camp meeting site that swelled with thousands of visitors each summer. The 1885 Round Lake Auditorium, at 7th and Wesley streets, is home to a 34-foot-tall, historically significant pipe organ. The auditorium is still in use—not for delivering sermons but with a lively performing arts program.

    From Round Lake Village the trail crosses over Route 9 and through a portion of the town of Clifton Park. The trail turns east upon leaving the park. A pond on the south side of the trail signals the end of the develop