• Banks-Vernonia State Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 21 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Banks–Vernonia Rail Trail is 21 miles of paved trail between the two Oregon towns of, what else, Banks and Vernonia. The trail links these town with other stops in between—Manning, Tophill, Stub Stewart, Beaver Creek and Buxton—providing a spectacular recreation opportunity for cyclists, walkers, runners or equestrians. Old railroad trestles, wildflowers and wildlife add to the charm of this nature-lover's trail. The trail is steep in places so cyclists are asked to walk their bikes or slow way down for your own safety and that of other trail users. The trail climbs from Banks toward Vernonia, passing through the Hilltop Day Use Area (camping available).

    The has 13 bridges and two 700-foot long, 80-foot high railroad trestles at Buxton and Horseshoe, offering amazing views. There's an equestrian bypass at Buxton, which crosses Mendenhall Creek. The route follows an abandoned railroad corridor, which was used between the 1920s and 1957 to haul timber from mills in Vernonia and Keasey to Portland. For five years during the 1960s, the rail was used as a passenger excursion; construction of the trail began in 1991.

  • Brookwood Parkway Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 1.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Brookwood Parkway Trail, in a northwestern suburb of Portland, skirts the Hillsboro airport and provides access to the Hillsboro Public Library and the sprawling campuses of a few large corporations. Although the paved trail parallels its namesake roadway for the entire length of its nearly 2-mile journey, it's not without some scenic views of rural landscapes and woodlands.
  • Burnt Bridge Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 7.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The scenic Burnt Bridge Creek Trail meanders through Vancouver, Washington, along the creek from Stewart Glen on the shores of Vancouver Lake to Meadowbrook Marsh. Along the way, the trail passes through forests, grasslands and city neighborhoods, as well as Leverich Park and Arnold Park. Travelers should take note that the trail veers onto sidewalks in a few well-marked places.

  • PROJECT: Cazadero Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface:

    From Portland area Metro

    The proposed Cazadero Trail route follows the historic Oregon Water Power and Railway Co. rail line, which connected Portland to Cazadero, two miles upriver from Estacada. The trail would drop into Deep Creek Canyon from the northeast in Boring and extend the Springwater Corridor from downtown Portland to Barton. The creek serves as the principal corridor connecting the Clackamas River to habitat in the urbanizing Milwaukie and Johnson Creek watershed. Interested parties working on plans and coordinating efforts for the Cazadero Trail corridor include Clackamas County, the Boring CPO, the Salvation Army and Oregon State Parks.

    In the future, the Cazadero Trail could extend beyond Barton through Eagle Creek, Estacada, the Faraday, Cazadero and Promontory Park areas on up the Clackamas River corridor eventually connecting to Mount Hood and the Pacific Crest Trail.
  • Chelatchie Prairie Railroad Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Chelatchie Prairie Railroad Trail—also known as the Chelatchie Prairie Rail-with-Trail—is currently open from Battle Ground Lake State Park to a point nearly 1 mile southwest. The paved trail runs next to the Clark County-owned Chelatchie Prairie Railroad, which sees limited freight and excursion rail use.

    Clark County is planning on extending the trail along the entire 33-mile length of the railroad from the existing Burnt Bridge Creek Trail near Hazel Dell Avenue in Vancouver to the railroad’s northern terminus in Chelatchie Prairie. See the project record for more information.

  • PROJECT: Chelatchie Prairie Railroad Trail Extension

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 32.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    From Chelatchie Prairie Rail-with-Trail Corridor Study:


    The Chelatchie Prairie Rail-with-Trail (RWT) is envisioned as a 33-mile multi-use trail within the railroad right-of-way where possible. In some areas the trail alignment will use existing trails, roadways or alignments outside of the right-of-way to meet width or terrain needs.

    Construction started in May 2011 for the initial 1-mile segment that runs from the entrance road inside Battle Ground Lake State Park southwest along the railroad tracks to Washington State Department of Natural Resources land. That portion of the trail is now open for public use.

  • Columbia River Dike Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    The Columbia River Dike Trail—also known as the Captain William Clark Park Trail and the Cottonwood Beach Trail—follows the Columbia River from Steamboat Landing Park to the border of the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Along the way, trail-goers will enjoy views of the river and Mt. Hood.

    The trail parallels Cottonwood Beach and is named for Lewis and Clark, who camped there in 1806. Walkers may enjoy taking a partial loop back on the Gibbons Creek Wildlife Trail in the adjacent wildlife area.

  • Columbia Slough Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 4.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Columbia Slough Trail follows its namesake waterway on the northern end of Portland. Although there are currently gaps in the trail, it will one day follow the entire length of the narrow 19-mile stream. When completed, the trail will be an important component of the 40-Mile Loop, a greenway that will encircle the city and extend to other parts of Multnomah County.

    Although there are some industrial views along the way, the trail connects city dwellers to many natural areas. The pathway begins in Kelley Point Park, at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers. Here, you can find a nice shady spot to picnic or watch ships traveling through the port. Further east is Delta Park, which abounds with recreational amenities, including football, soccer, and softball fields, a volleyball court, a playground, picnic tables and an off-leash area for dogs.

    To continue your adventure, you can hop on the trail's northern neighbor, the Marine Drive Trail, which follows the Columbia River, or connect to the Peninsula Crossing Trail, which heads southwest.
  • Coweeman River Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    The Coweeman River Trail follows the dike on the west side of the river for 4 miles, giving access to the riverfront and Tam O'Shanter Park. The setting on the northern section is residential, and the trail crosses under Interstate 5 several times before entering an industrial park on the southern end. The trail also passes near Three Rivers Mall, which can be accessed from Manasco Drive or Grade Street.
  • Cowlitz River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Cowlitz River Trail follows its namesake river along a dike on the east bank. The trail is asphalt and connects Kelso residents with the riverfront. The trail parallels the active BNSF line that carries Amtrak and much of the north-south freight in the Pacific Northwest. Access is limited to the trail because of grade separated crossings, but you can access at the endpoints or at Mill Street. The trail may be extended north in the future.

  • Edgewater Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 1.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Start the Edgewater Trail on Water Street at the north end of Riverfront Park. The 23-acre park is a beautiful place to spend an afternoon and enjoy river views. It has two unique features: a carousel with dozens of hand-carved and hand-painted wooden horses, and the Eco Earth Globe, created by local artists and students.

    Ride the ascending ramp and cross the Willamette River on the Center Street Bridge. On the other side, the trail follows the bank of the river between Edgewater Street and Dallas Highway.
  • Fanno Creek Greenway Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 10.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    When complete, the Fanno Creek Greenway will be a 15-mile paved network of fully accessible urban trails, linking two counties and five cities: Beaverton, Tigard, Tualatin, Durham, and southwest Portland. As of autumn 2011, about half of the trail system is finished.

    The trail courses along Fanno Creek and will eventually run between the Willamette River in the southwest section of Portland to Fanno Creek's confluence at the Tualatin River. Traversing wetlands, forests, parks and neighborhoods, the trail corridor is home to much wildlife. In addition, many parks and recreation venues provide diversions along the way.

  • Frenchman's Bar Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Frenchman's Bar Trail could not be in a prettier place nestled between the Columbia River and Vancouver Lake on the northwestern outskirts of Vancouver. The paved trail of nearly 4 miles loops around the southern half of Shillapoo Wildlife Recreation Area and offers views of Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Adams, and Mount Rainer. Stop and enjoy the scenery at the picnic areas in Frenchman's Bar Regional Park on the trail's west end or Vancouver Lake Regional Park on its eastern side.
  • Gresham Fairview Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 3.29 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Gresham–Fairview Trail is a north–south corridor that will one day link Portland's 40-Mile Loop Trail (Marine Drive section) with the Springwater Trail's section through Gresham. As of spring 2012 the trail runs for a little more than 3 miles between the Springwater Trail and NE Halsey Street in Gresham. Plans are underway to finish the remaining 2 miles north to Marine Drive in Portland.

    The Gresham–Fairview Trail will also provide access to nature areas along Johnson Creek, Fairview Creek, Columbia Slough and the Columbia River.

  • Highway 26 Bike Path

    State: OR
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Highway 26 Bike Path is a paved commuter route in west Portland that parallels its namesake roadway (also known as Sunset Highway). A small segment is located in a busy shopping area of the Tanasbourne neighborhood.

    Further southeast, a pair of trail segments in the Sylvan-Highlands neighborhood are separated by a short on-road connection. Two public schools, East and West Sylvan Middle Schools, lie adjacent to the route. From the trail's eastern terminus, bicyclists can make an easy transition onto the marked bike lane along Canyon Court to continue east to nearby attractions, such as the Oregon Zoo, Hoyt Arboretum, and Washington Park.
  • Highway 500 Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The paved Highway 500 Trail runs just shy of a mile between Andresen Road and Thurston Way on Vancouver's west side through a busy stretch of car dealerships, shops and restaurants.
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 13.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail is an innovative road-to-trail conversion constructed on portions of the Historic Columbia River Highway. The trail is considered to be from milepoint 14.22 at the Sandy River Bridge near Troutdale to milepoint 88 near The Dalles.

    The original 75-mile vehicular route was the first major paved highway in the Pacific Northwest and the first scenic highway constructed in the United States. Following the path of the Lewis and Clark and Oregon Trails, the highway was carefully carved out of the steep cliffs of the south bank of the Columbia River between 1913 and 1922.

    The road connected travelers with magnificent overlooks offering views of the Columbia River Gorge and five waterfalls, including Multnomah Falls (the most visited natural site in Oregon). It also connected Portland to the settlements of Cascade Locks, Hood River, Mosier, and The Dalles. During construction of Interstate 84 in the 1950s, this engineering marvel was segmented and partially destroyed, leaving only small scenic loops at both ends.

    Today, the Oregon Department of Transportation is working to restore and resurrect the demolished segments as a multiuse recreational trail, enabling bikers and hikers to experience the old highway's dramatic vistas and restored historic bridges, tunnels, guardrails and beautifully arched rock masonry walls.

    There are currently three sections of the trail open exclusively for bike/pedestrian use, totaling just over 13 miles:

    • The eastern most section of the bike/pedestrian-use-only route stretches between the cities of Mosier and Hood River and is approximately 5 miles. This section runs through a forest of fir and pine trees, as well as two restored tunnels.

    • Between Hood River and Cascade Locks is a 2-mile section between Starvation Creek State Park (renowned for its waterfall) and Viento State Park, where camping is available.

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  • I-205 Multi-Use Path

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 18.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The I-205 Multi-use Path parallels Interstate 205 between Vancouver, Washington, just north of the Columbia River and Oregon City, Oregon. The trail breaks in a few places: in Oregon City near the shopping mall along Main Street (easily bridged via Main Street) and between High Rocks City Park and the Harley Davidson dealership, then between the junctions of I-205 at SR 212/224 and I-205 at 82nd Drive.

    The route also follows alongside part of the MAX Green Line rail. The trail is popular with commuters and recreationists alike, with access to parking at public transportation stops along the way and other amenities (e.g., restrooms and drinking fountains). The various segments are connected by bike routes and bike lanes. To connect the northern segment to the Gladstone segment, use bike lanes on 82nd Drive. To connect the Gladstone segment to the southern segment, use bike lanes and routes on Agnes and Main Streets.

  • I-84 Bike Path

    State: OR
    Length: 4.9 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The I-84 Bike Path begins at the I-84 intersection with Fairview Parkway and continues west along the interstate for nearly 5 miles. A fence and concrete barrier separate trail-goers from traffic. Although not scenic, the bike path offers an important commuter route connecting commercial and residential areas in northeast Portland and Gresham.
  • Lacamas Heritage Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.5 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    The Lacamas Heritage Trail parallels Lacamas Creek and the western shore of Lacamas Lake under a canopy of old growth forest. Along this scenic gravel pathway, trail-goers can catch glimpses of the abundant wildlife in the area and enjoy views of the lake, waterfalls and interesting rock formations.
  • Logging Road Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 3.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Logging Road Trail runs along the eastern outskirts of Canby, about 20 miles south of Portland. The road was once used by logging trucks, but is now closed to vehicular traffic.

    Views along the paved trail's southern end are a mix of residential and commercial properties, as well as rural landscapes. Here, the trail sits adjacent to Baker Prairie Middle School (with Trost Elementary School also nearby), offering a nice route for students to use.

    The northern end runs between a golf course and the densely forested Eco City Park, becoming quite scenic as it approaches the Willamette River.

  • Lombard Street Path

    State: OR
    Length: 1.8 miles
    Surface: Concrete

    The Lombard Street Path stretches nearly 2 miles through an industrial area of northern Portland. At the southern end of Kelley Point Park, the path makes two important connections: It meets the Columbia Slough Trail, which will one day parallel the full length of the 19-mile stream, and Marine Drive Trail, a 17-mile trek along the south shore of the Columbia River. Both trails are part of the 40-Mile Loop that will someday encircle Portland and extend to other parts of Multnomah County.

    Kelley Point Park, at the trail's north end, features vistas of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and offers places to swim, boat and fish in the water.

  • Marine Drive Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 17.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Marine Drive Trail follows its namesake roadway along the south shore of the Columbia River. You'll often find you're just feet from the river and can enjoy lovely views of the water, boats and marinas along the way. The trail is wide, flat and paved, making it a good bet for commuters in a hurry, as well as an easy and leisurely ride for families. Pets are also welcome.

    Although there are currently gaps in the trail, one day it will be an important part of the 40-Mile Loop that will encircle Portland and extend to other parts of Multnomah County.

    Its western end begins in Kelley Point Park, where you'll find beaches, wooded areas, a historical site, picnic tables and restrooms.

    You'll continue southeast to the Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area, home to a diverse amount of wildlife, including more than 100 species of birds such as bald eagles, great-horned owls, red-tailed hawks and great egrets. The park offers scenic overlooks, walking paths and restrooms.

    East of I-5, the trail provides access to Broughton Beach, a popular recreational area north of the Portland International Airport. From here, the trail continues its eastward journey to Interstate 205. Note that there is little shade on this section.

    If you wish to cross the river and head north into Vancouver, or go south, you can hop on the 16-mile I-205 Multi-Use Path. From other points along the pathway, you can also access the Columbia Slough Trail, which offers connections to other scenic natural areas.
  • Padden Parkway Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Padden Parkway Trail provides a paved, 5-mile route across northeastern Vancouver, connecting neighborhoods and shopping areas. Trail-goers are separated from the busy four-lane roadway by a wide, well-manicured median. On its western end, a 560-foot bridge allows bicyclists and pedestrians to safely cross over I-205.
  • Peninsula Crossing Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 5.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    As its name implies, the Peninsula Crossing Trail cuts through a peninsula between the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in northern Portland. The tree-lined trail traverses urban neighborhoods and features public artwork. Its southern tip approaches the Willamette Cove, a natural habitat on the banks of the Willamette River.

    From its northern end, you can continue your journey on the Columbia Slough Trail, which offers access to scenic natural areas along its namesake stream. To do so, you'll need to take a short off-trail route: take a right (go east) at Columbia Boulevard, taking the sidewalk on the right-hand side; cross the street at the Portsmouth Avenue traffic light and continue 1 block to Columbia Court. After 1 block north on Columbia Court, you'll take a right to get back on the pathway and reach the Columbia Slough Trail.
  • Riverfront Trail (OR)

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 1.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Salem's Riverfront Trail begins in Riverfront Park on the east bank of the Willamette River. The park offers expansive views of the river and contains two unique features: a carousel with beautiful hand-carved horses and a public art piece called the Eco Earth Globe. On its northern end, you can also connect with the Edgewater Trail.

    Riverfront Trail continues over Union Street Railroad Bridge, a steel and timber trestle completed by Southern Pacific Railway in 1913. In 2004, the city of Salem bought the bridge from Union Pacific Railroad (later owners) for $1. It's now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    On the other side of the bridge is Wallace Marine Park, stretching more than 100 acres with opportunities to picnic and access the water by boat. The park also houses Star Complex, where many state, regional, and national sporting events are held.
  • Rock Creek Trail (OR)

    State: OR
    Length: 1.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Boardwalk

    The Rock Creek Trail provides an important commuting route and natural escape in one of Oregon's largest cities: Hillsboro, located in the "Silicon Forest," a high-tech corridor on Portland's western side. The trail runs through a scenic greenway offering beautiful views of the creek, towering evergreens, meadows and wetlands. Orchard Park is a good place to start your journey; the park offers parking, restrooms and picnic areas. You'll then travel north across paved and boardwalk sections to the trail's end in Rock Creek Park.

    Future plans call for extending the trail south another six miles to Rood Bridge Park, which offers access to the Tualatin River.
  • Salmon Creek Greenway Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Salmon Creek Greenway Trail offers a scenic natural getaway in northern Vancouver. The paved, tree-lined trail winds along the creek and through wetlands for 3 miles, offering access to Salmon Creek Park and Klineline Pond on its eastern end. Sightings of deer, rabbits, raccoons, beavers, and many kinds of birds are common.

  • PROJECT: Salmonberry Corridor Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 86 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    The Salmonberry Corridor Rail-Trail is a promising project under development that will span 86 miles from the outskirts of Portland to the Pacific Ocean. The trail is named for one of its most scenic sections, which runs along the Salmonberry River through a pristine wilderness.

    For its entirety, the trail follows the century-old Pacific Railway and Navigation Company rail bed, which—due to its steep grades and sharp curves—gained the moniker, “Punk, Rotten and Nasty.” Relicts of its railroad heritage include 13 railroad tunnels and dozens of trestles, including the Big Baldwin Bridge, which offers a stunning view.

    The east end of the trail will begin in the pastoral community of Banks at the foothills of the Coast Range. Here, it will connect to the popular 21-mile Banks-Vernonia State Trail, Oregon’s first rail-trail.

    The western half of the trail, from Enright to Tillamook, will parallel an active line, the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad, in a scenario known as rail-with-trail. The organization offers tourist excursions down the coast using vintage locomotives and an all-volunteer crew.

    The trail will end on the south side of Tillamook at the Port of Tillamook Bay’s Industrial Park, which includes an air museum that once served as a blimp hanger and, today, showcases World War II aircraft.

    The trail is intended to be used by bicyclists, walkers, and equestrians and is expected to be mostly gravel with some paved sections through city centers. A master plan for the rail-trail is anticipated to be completed by November 2014.

  • Springwater Corridor

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 21.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Springwater Corridor forms a major southeast segment of the 40-Mile Loop, a multi-use trail that circles the city of Portland, some of which is incomplete. The 21.5-mile Springwater Corridor extends from SE 4th Avenue at SE Ivon Street in Portland (near the Willamette River) to the town of Boring. The trail is paved the entire way. There is a gap in the trail between 13th and 19th streets in Portland, which can be bridged by an on-road segment.

    Portland is renowned and envied for its parks, trails and general outdoors vibe, and the Springwater Corridor fits rights in. The trail winds along the banks of the Willamette River in downtown Portland to the rural exurbs, connecting a diversity of neighborhoods, natural areas and industrial sites. It's important for both recreation and a transportation commuter corridor: the trail links bike lanes, transit, light rail, buses and other regional trails.

    The Springwater's history stretches back to the early 1900s, when a rail line was built to bring people, produce and timber from areas south and east of Portland into the growing metropolis. Known variously as the Portland Traction Company Line, the Cazadero Line and the Bellrose Line, the railroad finally adopted the name of the Springwater Division Line, although neither the railroad nor the trail that bears the town's name ever reached this small community.

    As the automobile gained dominance, the Springwater line faded, and it finally ceased carrying passengers in 1958. Freight- and timber-hauling operations continued for three more decades, but by the 1980s derailments were common along the aging Springwater line. Portland eventually bought the railroad corridor for a multi-use trail.

    From the eastern terminus, you will enjoy views of the Willamette River and downtown Portland's different business districts. Heading east, you pass through residential areas, following Johnson Creek most of the way to Gresham. Between Gresh

  • PROJECT: Sullivan's Gulch Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 4.3 miles
    Surface:

    Sullivan's Gulch is a project trail still in the early stages of development. Envisioned is a 4.3 to 5 mile long east-west corridor, connecting Portland to its outlying neighborhoods. The plans currently call for a rail-with-trail that will follow alongside local MAX light rail tracks, I-84 and an active freight line, from I-285 to the Willamette River. Running uninterrupted, this path could easily serve as direct access to downtown Portland as well as access to many rapid mass transit options.

    Currently, a series of feasibility studies are being conducted to better assess the master plan and the funding necessary for its completion. It is expected that the studies will take roughly a year. According to initial projections for the Sullivan Gulch trail, construction is expected to begin in 2015.
  • Terwilliger Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 5.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Terwilliger Trail offers a beautiful, paved route from southern Portland to Lake Oswego in two disconnected segments. Most of the trail corridor runs through Multnomah County; its southern tip lies in Clackamas County.

    The trail begins in a busy commercial area in the northeast corner of Lake Oswego, but immediately heads into the woods of Tryon Creek State Park and remains under heavy tree canopy for the remainder of the trip north, where it pops out on Terwilliger Boulevard. Hiking and wildlife viewing opportunities abound in the park.

    The other segment of the trail picks up north of I-5 and continues its path north along Terwilliger Boulevard. It winds downhill through the woods of George Himes City Park and continues through the trees to its end in Duniway Park, just south of downtown Portland. If you're lucky enough to visit in late March to early May, you can enjoy the park's lilac garden. Along the way, the trail skirts the campus of Oregon Health & Science University.
  • Trolley Trail (OR)

    Rail-Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Oregon's Trolley Trail was once a streetcar line serving Portland's metro area. The old Oregon City Line trolley ran between Milwaukie and Gladstone from 1893 until 1968. As of 2012, 6 miles of the route are a brand new multi-use path. Eventually the Trolley Trail will become part of a 20-mile loop connecting Portland, Milwaukie, Gladstone, Oregon City and Gresham. It will also link the Springwater Corridor trail with the I-205 Multi-use Path.

    Most of the Trolley Trail runs along existing city streets but is separated from traffic by wide corridors of tree and grass. Some sections, such as the portion between SE Concord Road and SE Roethe Road, travel off-road through residential areas. The trail links neighborhoods with schools, parks and business districts, and many historical buildings along the route showcase Western Farmhouse and Craftsman-Bungalow architectural styles. Check out the Jacob Risley and Charles Risley houses near SE Risley Avenue—outstanding works of the Italianate and Queen Anne styles.

    Despite the trail's urban setting, you're also likely to see wildlife. Watch for opossums, beavers, great blue herons, green herons and western screech owls have been spotted here.

  • Vera Katz Eastbank Esplanade

    State: OR
    Length: 1.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Eastbank Esplanade traces Portland's Willamette River from the Steel Bridge on the north end to SE Caruthers Street on the south end. The trail is named for former Portland mayor Vera Katz, who supported the construction of the esplanade. Although the trail is less than 2 miles, it offers views of the river, downtown and public art.

    Four bridges along the way allow you to reach the west side of the river, where you can take the Waterfront Bike Path for a pleasant loop. For a longer ride, you can also connect to the Springwater Corridor, a member of the Rail-Trail Hall of Fame located off Ivon Street, about 3 blocks south of the esplanade's southern end.

  • Waterfront Bike Path

    State: OR
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Waterfront Bike Path follows the Willamette River in downtown Portland from the Marquam Bridge north to the Steel Bridge. Although short, the trail offers scenic views of the city skyline and waterway. Along the way, it passes through Tom McCall Waterfront Park, where you can find restrooms, historical attractions and an incredible fountain with 185 water jets.

    For a pleasant loop, cross one of the four bridges along the route to reach the Eastbank Esplanade on the opposite bank.

  • Westside Trail

    State: OR
    Length: 8.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The developing Westside Trail in Portland's western suburbs will be a 25-mile paved, multi-use path between the Willamette River to the north and the Tualatin River to the south. Currently, 8 miles are complete with much of the route transversing a scenic Bonneville Power utility corridor.

    The trail will be a recreational gem, connecting many parks, including Tualatin Hills Nature Park and the 5,000-acre Forest Park. Along the way, trail-goers will have views of woodlands, wetlands, native prairie grasses, and wildflowers. Bird watching and wildlife spotting promise to be popular past times.

    The Westside Trail will also serve as an important alternative transportation corridor through a heavily populated and fast-growing portion of Washington County, including the communities of Hillsboro, Beaverton and Tigard. TriMet's MAX Blue Line will provide commuters with easy access to the trail via light rail.

  • Whistle Punk Interpretive Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    ,a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/gpnf/recreation/trails/locations/mta-0059-whistle-punk.shtml">US Forest Service:


    This trail is a barrier-free interpretive trail that tells the story of forest management from a historical perspective. Signs and a brochure guide visitors along the trail, which runs along an old railroad grade (dating back to 1913) and past features associated with railroad logging by the Wind River Logging Company. The trail also goes past a wetland area and into an old-growth forest. The final leg of the trail takes visitors through an old Wind River Nursery field. Enjoy the lush scenery, waterfalls, wildflowers and spectacular views encountered on the trails within the Gorge and the Gifford Pinchot National Forest featured here..
    A NW Forest Pass is Required.