• Appleway Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    On the eastern end of Spokane Valley, the Appleway Trail parallels the southern side of Appleway Avenue along a former Milwaukie Railroad right-of-way. Although only about a mile, the trail runs through a busy part of town; trail-goers will pass several businesses along the way and residential neighborhoods lie just south of the trail. Extensions for the trail are planned; eventually, it will provide a 5-mile route through the city.

     

     

  • Benn Burr Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.1 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Dirt, Gravel

    Spokane's Benn Burr Trail runs for just a short distance through the southeast part of the city. On one end you have Liberty Park, on the other, Underhill Park. In between are old neighborhoods on tree-lined streets. Equally tree-line is the trail corridor, making for a pleasant stroll.

  • Centennial Trail State Park

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 37.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Centennial Trail State Park, sometimes referred to as the Spokane River Centennial Trail, follows the winding course of the Spokane River between the Washington–Idaho state line and Sontag Park in Nine Mile Falls. At its eastern border, you can link to the Liberty Lake State Line Trail or the North Idaho Centennial Trail, heading east across the river.

    The paved trail is not only multi-use, but it crosses a diverse terrain, from urban landscape to suburbs and neighborhood parks to more remote countryside. During spring some sections of the trail can flood. Visit Friends of the Centennial Trail for flood advisories as well as detailed maps, trail information and construction updates.

    A section of trail that opened in 2013 runs through the new Kendall Yards development, which occupies the site of a former rail yard in the West Central neighborhood of Spokane. Stunning views of the Spokane River from the trail quickly made this section a favorite of locals.

    Another highlight of the trail is Riverfront Park in downtown Spokane. The 100-acre park was the site of the 1974 World’s Fair and many interesting and unusual attractions can be found here, such as the Looff Carrousel. The ride was built at the turn-of-the-century and features hand-carved and beautifully painted wooden horses and Chinese dragons. Another popular attraction is the Spokane Falls SkyRide, a cable car ride offering panoramic views over a series of rushing waterfalls. And rising 155 feet above the park is an impressive brick clock tower dating back to 1902. It was once part of the Great Northern Railroad Depot that was torn down during preparations for Expo '74.

    East of Riverfront Park is the

    Columbia Plateau Trail State Park

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 130 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Dirt, Grass, Gravel

    As of late 2011 the Columbia Plateau Trail State Park has developed 38 miles in two segments between Fish Lake near Cheney and Martin Road near Sprague, and between Ice Harbor Dam near the Tri-Cities and Snake River Junction. It passes through the scenic uplands of eastern Washington and along the Snake River. The middle 92 miles are undeveloped and difficult going.

    The trail follows part of the former right-of-way of the Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railroad, and you'll see mile markers with numbers referencing the distance from Portland, Oregon. The 23-mile northern segment (Fish Lake to Martin Road) is paved for the first 3.75 miles, from Fish Lake to Cheney, with parking and bathrooms at both locations. The trail then turns to gravel and passes through Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge on its way to the Amber Lake and Martin Road trailheads.

    The 15-mile southern segment runs between Ice Harbor Dam and Snake River Junction. You'll likely see much wildlife among the scenic landscape, and interpretive signs tell about key features along the trail. The trail connects to the unpaved Fish Lake Trail on the north, which will eventually reach Spokane. For more information, call Columbia Plateau Trail State Park at 509-646-9218. An access fee is required.

  • Fish Lake Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 10 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    This scenic trail passes through open forest and uplands and is uphill from Spokane to Fish Lake. The trail is now paved for more than 7 miles from the trailhead south Govenment Way in Spokane to the vicinity of Marshall. The City of Spokane owns the corridor and is working to complete the trail which needs to cross active rail lines near Marshall.

    Trail users can access the trail at the trailhead one block south of the intersection of Government and Sunset, where a new 23 spot parking lot and restrooms are available.

    Continuing southeast beyond the pavement, the route is rough again and a short stretch is essentially closed until safety and ownership issues can be resolved where the trail twice crosses live rail lines.

    At the south end the trail connects to the Columbia Plateau trail and is paved for an additional 3.75 miles on its way into Turnbill National Wildlife Refuge and on to the Snake River.
  • John Wayne Pioneer Trail (Milwaukee Road Corridor)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 253 miles
    Surface: Crushed Stone, Gravel

    John Wayne Pioneer Trail offers more than 250 miles of scenic trail across Washington, from the eastern outskirts of Seattle to the state’s border with Idaho. It’s named for the John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders Association, who were instrumental in the trail’s creation. Chic Hollenbeck, an avid horse rider and founder of the group, was a hardcore fan of the iconic cowboy actor.

    The rail-trail follows the corridor of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (also known as the Milwaukee Road), which operated in the region between 1908 and 1980. Railroad tunnels, trestle bridges, depots, and other relics of the past can be experienced as you travel the old railbed.

    The Columbia River serves as a natural dividing line with a different trail experience on each side. Unfortunately, there currently is no convenient pedestrian access over the river to get from one side of the trail to the other. Though the trail leads to a trestle over the river, it’s in a poor, unsafe condition. Detour north of the trestle to the community of Vantage to take the I-90 bridge to the river’s eastern shore, noting that you’ll need to make the crossing by car.

    On the east side of the Columbia River, you’ll find 143 miles of rougher trail best-suited for experienced adventurers. This half of the trail passes through four counties, from west to east: Grant, Adams, Whitman, and Spokane. From the river east to the small town of Lind, the trail is known as the Milwaukee Road Corridor and is managed by the state’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR).  From Lind east to Idaho, the trail is managed by Washington State Parks.

    The trail on the west side of the river is also managed by Washington State Parks and traverses the linear Iron Horse State Park. This half of the trail is a well-developed 110-mile gravel pathway. In 2009, the state closed five tunnels on this stretch due to seeping water and

  • Liberty Lake Stateline Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The 1.8-mile Liberty Lake Stateline Trail is situated between Interstate 90 and Appleway Road in Liberty Lake, Washington. A moderately flat 10-foot wide paved surface makes walking or riding easy. The majority of the trail adjacent to I-90 rests on the former Spokane and Inland Empire railbed.

    The railroad, an electric interurban, built this section of line in the early 20th century to link the towns of Spokane, Washington, and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The line was abandoned in the 1970's and the rail was removed during the 1980's and 1990's.

    The eastern trailhead of the Liberty Lake Stateline Trail connects with the Spokane River Centennial Trail at Spokane Bridge Road. Traveling westward, the trail parallels I-90 towards newly developed portions of Liberty Lake.

    The trail was constructed in the summer of 2002. Trees were added along the trail by Spokane County the following year.

  • Liberty Lake Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Liberty Lake Trail offers a paved north-south route through a suburb of Spokane. At its northern end, it connects to the famed Spokane River Centennial Trail, which stretches 37 miles through downtown Spokane and reaches the Idaho border. From that trail juncture, the Liberty Lake Trail heads south, paralleling N. Harvard Road. A grassy median separates the trail from the road and a few trees dot the path.

    After a half-mile, the trail reaches Appleway Avenue. If you head east following the sidewalk along Appleway, you'll reach the Liberty Lake Stateline Trail after 1.5 miles. If instead you head south, you'll continue on the Liberty Lake Trail, which now parallels Liberty Lake Road. The trail crosses over busy I-90 on a pedestrian bridge, traverses the Trailhead Golf Course, and ends about a half-mile shy of the city's eponymous lake.

  • North Idaho Centennial Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: ID
    Length: 24 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The North Idaho Centennial Trail is a non-motorized, multi-use trail that meanders 24 miles between scenic Higgens Point State Park on Lake Coeur d'Alene (6 miles east of the city) and the Idaho–Washington border, where it joins the Liberty Lake Stateline Trail. The North Idaho Centennial Trail hugs the shores of Lake Coeur d'Alene and parts of the Spokane River, offering spectacular scenery along the way. The trail passes through the Lewis & Clark College and North Idaho College campuses and follows well-marked back streets in Coeur d'Alene. You'll find plenty of rest areas, scenic views and interpretative signs along the way. In 1999 Hillary Clinton designated the trail a Millennium Trail.

    At Riverstone you can pick up the Prairie Trail.

  • Prairie Trail (ID)

    Rail-Trail

    State: ID
    Length: 4.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Prairie Trail is a spur off the popular North Idaho Centennial Trail, a 24-mile scenic pathway from Coeur d'Alene to the Idaho/Washington border. The paved spur travels northwest for 4 miles along the former Union Pacific Railroad, connecting parks, neighborhoods, schools and businesses.

    Riverstone Park at the southern end of the trail is a good place to begin your adventure; it offers picnic areas, restrooms and a beautiful lake with fountains. Several restaurants are also located nearby off Riverstone Drive. Further up the trail, you'll traverse the western border of Ramsey Park, where you can find athletic fields, playgrounds, shaded picnic areas and restrooms.

    The northern end of the trail opens up to offer views of rural landscapes. The trail ends at N. Huetter Road and future plans call for extending the trail another mile east from here to Meyer Road.
  • Spokane Iron Bridge

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    On the eastern side of Spokane, a striking iron railroad bridge spans 560 feet across the Spokane River. Built in 1911 by the Oregon & Washington Railroad and Navigation Company, the bridge serviced mining areas in the Coeur d'Alene district of Idaho and the northern Bitterroot Mountains of Montana. The line closed in 1973 to make way for the 1974 Spokane World's Fair.

    The bridge opened in 2012 and is just steps from the popular Centennial Trail State Park, a paved 37-mile rail-trail that extends to the Washington–Idaho state line.

  • PROJECT: Spokane Valley-Millwood Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 6.5 miles
    Surface:

    The Spokane Valley-Millwood trail will connect on both ends to the Centennial Trail, providing a loop and access for residents of Spokane Valley to the non-motorized network of trails in Spokane. The trail will use the abandoned Great Northern Railway right-of-way that is now owned by Spokane County and run adjacent to active freight tracks. A great example of an urban pathway, the project will connect to schools, parks, business districts, transit facilities, neighborhoods, Spokane Community College, and a regional mall. Currently used by walkers, joggers, and mountain bikers, the project will provide a paved trail with adjacent soft surface area for walking and running. The City of Spokane Valley recently secured a grant to complete planning and initial design that should be complete in early 2014.
  • Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes

    Rail-Trail

    State: ID
    Length: 72 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Few long bicycle trails come any better than the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. The trail covers 72 entirely paved, wheelchair accessible miles through scenic mountains and valleys in Idaho's Panhandle. The area has a rich mining, railroading and Native American history, too, and there are plenty of places to stop to enjoy the scenery and visit local attractions. So take a few days and plan an outdoor adventure here, exploring the trail in segments. You won't regret it.

    Between Harrison and Plummer the trail is just over 15 miles one way and skirts the shoreline of sparkling Lake Coeur d'Alene. Immerse yourself in this landscape of rolling foothills in the Palouse prairie. A few scattered confers dot the hills. Cross the southern end of Lake Coeur d'Alene over the Chatcolet Bridge. It has a stair-step ramp to ease the uphill climb and makes for an exhilarating ride downhill, rollercoaster-like.

    At Heyburn State Park you can stop for a refreshing swim before carrying on to the western end point in Plummer.

    Between Harrison and Medimont the trail passes through Idaho's chain-of-lakes region, linked by the Coeur d'Alene River. Watch for wildlife through here, including coyotes, otters, beavers, birds of prey, moose, and maybe even a black bear.

    From Medimont east, the trail travels in Idaho's Silver Valley, once one of the most productive silver mining areas in the country. The Cataldo Mission State Park is nearby, and worth a visit, although you'll have a few miles of on-road riding off the trail to reach it.

    From Cataldo the trail follows the Coeur d'Alene River through the Silver Valley. The mountains are more forested here as you head toward Kellogg, the largest town along the trail. There are plenty of places to eat here. Next along the way you'll reach historical Wallace, jam packed with restaurants and cool attractions. While you're here, cycle over to the intersection of 6th and Bank Streets and get your family pic