• Duwamish Bikeway

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.95 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Duwamish Bikeway runs for nearly 3 miles, paralleling Puget Park on the city's southwest side. Along the east side of the trail are highly industrial shipping yards, making this trail more for getting from point A to point B rather than for a pleasant getaway.

  • Burke-Gilman Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 18.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Burke-Gilman Trail is as much a thoroughfare for commuting to work and the University of Washington as it is a staple for social recreation and fitness. Built in the 1970s, the trail was among the first rail-trails in the country and helped inspire dozens of similar projects around the nation.

    Golden Gardens Park and the Sammamish River Trail mark the boundaries of the Burke-Gilman Trail, once a line of the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway (SLS&E). Created in 1885 by two prominent Seattle residents, Thomas Burke and Daniel Gilman, the SLS&E was purchased by the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1901. Heavy traffic by the logging industry sustained the line through 1963, and the corridor became inactive in 1971. The heavy traffic continues as trail users make their way from Puget Sound to Lake Union and Lake Washington.

    You can start your journey at Puget Sound at the Golden Gardens Park entrance, on the east side of Seaview Avenue NW. Reach the NW 60th Street Viewpoint by traversing the waterfront and marina for just over a mile. Signs direct you to cross Seaview Avenue and head 0.7 mile to the Ballard Locks. The sidewalk along Seaview Avenue, now NW 54th Street, connects to NW Market Street in downtown Ballard.

    To reach the 1-mile on-road portion of the missing trail link, turn right at Shilshole Avenue NW. Turn left onto NW Vernon Place, and then turn right onto Ballard Avenue NW. A right onto 17th Avenue NW returns you to Shilshole Avenue, where the road is painted for cyclists and becomes NW 45th Street after crossing under the Ballard Bridge. Return to the sidewalk and trail at 11th Avenue NW and 45th.

    Leaving Puget Sound, you will find yourself in a park beside the Fremont Canal that connects the sound to Lake Union. Past the steps waits Fremont, a great area for food, gelato, a glimpse of the famous Fremont Rocket, a Vladimir Lenin statue,

  • Coal Creek Trail (WA)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.7 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt, Grass, Woodchips

    The Coal Creek Trail offers trail users a wealth of coal history, fitness, and nature in a forested fish and wildlife habitat, with interpretive signs that highlight the relics to be found along the 3.7-mile soft-mulch route.

    Moderate and flat terrain defines the 2.5-mile eastern segment, while continuous hills comprise the lower 1.2 miles. Boardwalks, stairs, bridges, and benches add not only safety and ease in a fairly dense forest but also artistry and impressive engineering.

    From the Red Town trailhead, the trail extends into a history of coal mining beginning in the 1860s. In 1917, this multiethnic community of 1,000 people produced 360,000 tons of coal. The Seattle and Walla Walla coal trains carried their loads to the coal docks, where the coal was shipped to San Francisco. Though the rail never reached past Coal Creek, Seattle developed as a port city.

    The trail begins across the street from the parking lot of Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park. Once inside the deep forest, you'll find a sealed mine shaft and a short loop exposing a coal seam. The trail crosses a bridge, where a group of log benches, rust colored from the iron salts leached from coal, faces the North Fork Falls. The route continues through thick and diversely populated forest and past a cedar flume and coal bunker foundations.

    The narrow trail diverts from the railroad grade due to man-made hills of coal tailings (discarded rock). One mile in, if you take the 0.8-mile Primrose Trail, you'll pass the site of the old locomotive turntable. Switching back down (creek side), you'll cross three bridges before you loop back to the main trail. Wildflowers, snails, and butterflies; the tiny Sandstone Falls; and a pair of coal car axles are all visible along this part of the trail.

    The main trail descends 500 feet, with occasional slippery and muddy sections. Neighborhood access trails can be found along the level creek-side section, along with a retentio

  • Chehalis Western Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 21.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Chehalis Western Trail follows the route of a Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. railroad by the same name that carried millions of logs out of Washington forests to the coast for shipment from the 1920s to 1980s. Today, the 21.2-mile trail is the backbone for trails that link every major town in Thurston County, including the state capital, Olympia.

    From the Woodard Bay Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA) on Puget Sound, the trail passes through forests, farms, and pastures, as well as the suburban community of Lacey, as it heads south into the hills overlooking the scenic Deschutes River valley to its intersection with the Yelm-Tenino Trail.

    Users can find trailheads with parking at Woodard Bay, Chambers Lake at 14th Avenue SE, 67th Avenue SE, and Fir Tree Road between Summerwood and Country Vista Drives SE. Parking spaces for two or three cars are located at several other street crossings.

    If you start at the Chehalis Western Trailhead, you'll be able to hike the Upper Overlook Trail through Woodard Bay NRCA, unless you're there between April and August when the trail is closed for nesting herons. The path (hiking only) follows a siding of the former main line that crossed Woodard Bay and Weyer Point and ended at Weyerhaeuser's log dump in Chapman Bay, where logs were floated to mills in Everett. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources replanted the rail right-of-way and removed most of the trestles to restore the natural habitat here.

    Heading south, you'll arrive in Lacey to find pedestrian bridges over Martin Way SE, Interstate 5, and Pacific Avenue SE. Just south of that third bridge, the trail crosses the Woodland Trail, which serves as a 2.5-mile connection to Olympia.

    Trail traffic can get crowded in Lacey, where the old railroad corridor bisects new neighborhoods. South

  • Willapa Hills Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 56 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Grass, Gravel

    An adventure awaits those who tackle all, or part, of the 56-mile-long Willapa Hills Trail in southwestern Washington. The former Northern Pacific Railway line rolls through remote farm and forestland as it links Chehalis in the east with South Bend on the coast.

    The trail boasts inviting, smooth asphalt for 5.3 miles as it leaves Chehalis. Another paved section rolls for 5.2 miles through the coastal towns of Raymond and South Bend on the tidal Willapa River. Sandwiched in between are about 45 miles of trail surface—including packed and loose gravel, ballast, and grass—posing various degrees of difficulty. That middle section features many century-old trestles, some with missing decks, some with missing handrails, and some just missing altogether. Two trestles that were washed out in the 2007 flood—at Spooner Road and Doty-Dryad Road—should be rebuilt and open by late 2015.

    The route starts in Chehalis near the tourist train headquarters at the Chehalis–Centralia Railroad & Museum. You'll pass through pastures and small woodlots, and cross two trestles, before reaching a short stretch of gravel to slow down cyclists at a dangerous crossing of State Route 6 in Adna. After 2 miles, a 0.2-mile-long trestle with no deck covering the crossbeams marks the end of this section of trail. This trestle will be redecked, and side rails will be added, by the end of 2015.

    Beyond, you'll find a packed gravel trail and two more interruptions—-construction sites for washed-out trestles at Spooner Road and Dryad—as you pass whitewater in the river and once-thriving lumber mill towns.

    The trail deteriorates to mostly loose gravel en route to Pe Ell, a trailhead and old railway town said to be the mispronunciation of an early trapper named Pierre. The next 12 miles feature a winding grade in the Willapa Hills through timber stands of Douglas fir, cedar, and alder. You might spy deer or other wildlife here

  • Green River Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 19.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Notice: As of April 2014, work is beginning on the Green River levees in Kent that will require closing a section of the Green River Trail for the remainder of 2014. The trail will be closed for about 2.4 miles, between South 180th Street and South 200th Street. For more information, please visit the City of Kent website.


    The Green River Trail currently stretches nearly 20 miles through the industrial heart of the Green River Valley from the southern suburbs of Seattle to Kent, connecting to a number of neighborhoods and parks. As you might expect, the trail follows Washington's scenic Green River for its entire route.

    Direct connections to the Interurban Trail can be found twice along the Green River Trail; the first is in the north near Fort Dent Park and the second is at the trail's southern end near Foster Park on S. 259th Street. The Green River Trail currently ends in the south in Kent's North Green River Park, but long-term plans for the future call for an extension farther south through Auburn to Flaming Geyser State Park.

  • Middle Fork Snoqualmie River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 17 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel

    The Middle Fork Snoqualmie River Trail is open to hikers and horseback riders. The trail can be difficult to navigate in places, since other trails link with it (some unmaintained). There are a few stream and forest road crossings. For more details and directions, visit the Web links to the right.

    The trail is on the Snoqualmie Ranger District of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

  • Snoqualmie Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 31.5 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Gravel

    The Snoqualmie Valley Trail rolls from verdant dairy land in the north to a clear blue mountain lake in the south. Along the way, travelers are treated to numerous trestle crossings, historic towns, views of mountains and farmland, and a roaring waterfall.

    The 31.5-mile packed gravel trail follows an extension of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (also known as the Milwaukee Road) that linked Everett in the north to the main line heading east-west over the Cascades. The Snoqualmie Valley Trail joins the former Milwaukee Road main line, now known as the John Wayne Pioneer Trail (which extends east to the Idaho border).

    People on foot, bike, or horseback can expect extended flat sections and a couple of graded climbs. Trail users can choose their terrain by trailhead: Duvall to Carnation for a flat ride, Carnation to Snoqualmie Falls or North Bend to Rattlesnake Lake for a climb, or Snoqualmie to North Bend for preserved natural features. Multiple trailheads allow easy access to smaller chunks of trail and leapfrogging with a second car.

    In the north, Duvall's McCormick Park sits on the banks of the Snoqualmie River. The relocated railroad depot is restored nearby at Stephens Street and Railroad Avenue. The next 9 miles cross several farm entrances and roads en route to Carnation, which earned its name from the dairy industry that once boomed in the area and is remembered by large hay barns that dot that landscape. Wetlands, waterfowl, and songbirds create a peaceful, open setting and a barrier between trail and road. The trail arrives at Nick Loutsis Park in Carnation, where you can take a side trip a couple blocks west to visit riverside Tolt-MacDonald Park. The trail crosses the Tolt River and passes Remlinger Farms, open to the public.

    Leaving Carnation, the trail begins a moderate, 400-foot climb to the upper valley. Over the next 8 mi

  • Sammamish River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Sammamish River Trail rolls along smoothly through a wide, scenic greenway that's home to riverside parks and farms, as well as a growing wine industry. The trail is the center link of the Seattle area's locks-to-lakes corridor, which connects the Ballard Locks to Lakes Washington and Sammamish via the Burke-Gilman and East Lake Sammamish rail-trails.

    Yet the Sammamish River Trail isn't primarily a rail-trail. It's a levee trail that was created in the 1960s when crews drained the swamps and completed the second rechanneling of the one-time meandering Sammamish River. The wide asphalt trail follows the river for 11 miles, from Bothell's Blyth Park in the north (where it connects to the Burke-Gilman Trail) to Redmond's Marymoor Park in the south (where it links to the Marymoor Connector Trail and East Lake Sammamish Trail).

    Passing through the population centers of Bothell, Woodinville, and Redmond, the trail is one of King County's busiest. Visitors are drawn here by the open spaces; the views of far-off Mount Rainier and the closer Cascade foothills; and the opportunity to hike, run, skate, or ride a bike or a horse (a soft-surface side trail for equestrians is accessible between NE 175th Street in Woodinville to Marymoor Park). Bike commuters roll through here in the mornings and evenings, and lunchtime strollers fill the Redmond section on sunny weekdays.

    To start at Blyth Park in Bothell, leave the parking lot and turn left. Turn right onto a trail heading north, and then turn left at a sign pointing to the Sammamish River Trail and bear right at the next junction. The river supports lush surroundings here. A bridge crosses the river for a possible side trip to historical buildings at Bothell Landing. The trail mean

  • Snohomish County Centennial Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 30.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    History lures visitors to the Snohomish County Centennial Trail. Trail users are reminded of old-time river and railroad settlements in the historically preserved storefronts and homes in Snohomish and Arlington. Illustrated displays at the regularly spaced trailheads explain the social and commercial heritage of the area.

    The paved trail follows the original route of the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway, parts of which were later acquired by the Northern Pacific and Burlington Northern. The trail runs 30.5 miles from the town of Snohomish to the border of Skagit County. After the railroad corridor became inactive, local efforts began for a trail in 1989, the year of the state's centennial celebration. The first 6 miles opened in 1991. Long-range plans call for extending the route southward to King County's Burke-Gilman Trail.

    The Snohomish County Centennial Trail mostly rolls past farms and pastures and through forested watersheds. The path crosses creeks and rivers that drain the Cascade Mountains, whose snowy summits are visible in the east. Collectors might find it difficult to get started in Snohomish. More than a dozen antiques stores line First Street, where the trail currently starts. Better on-street parking is available at the traditional trailhead a few blocks north.

    Though the trail soon enters farmland on the edge of town, this is usually the busiest section. Horse riders are prohibited between the Snohomish and Pilchuck trailheads, as well as another congested section between Armar Road and Bryant. Travelers will notice some elevation gain after passing the replica train depot in Machias. After the former lumber mill town of Lake Stevens, the climb continues through a forested corridor to placid Lake Cassidy, where bicyclists gather at picnic tables or walk out onto the pier. Cresting the summit, the downhill run offers a couple of viewpoints across

  • Soundview Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The scenic Soundview Trail runs along and through the Chambers Bay public golf course—site of the U.S. Open in 2015—within Pierce County's Chambers Creek Regional Park. The 2-mile trail links at both ends with the slightly shorter Grandview Trail, allowing for longer treks on a loop through the park.

    While both trails are paved, the Soundview Trail is slightly more challenging due to steeper grades and several switchbacks needed to compensate. The ultimate payoff is worth it, with dramatic views of Puget Sound available along most of the trail's route. In the north, the trail also passes through a dense grove of trees, and in the south, the trail connects to several unpaved park trails.

  • Yelm-Tenino Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 14 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The 14-mile Yelm-Tenino Trail travels through the rural towns of Yelm, Rainier, and Tenino on a paved route through agricultural areas, forests, and wetlands. Commuters can access Olympia, Lacey, and other areas of Thurston County on a triad of linked trails. The 21.2-mile Chehalis Western Trail intersects the midpoint of the Yelm-Tenino Trail. The Chehalis Western then runs north, connecting with the Woodland Trail and reaching the perimeter of Woodard Bay. The Yelm-Tenino Trail climbs a gentle 320 feet from Tenino to Yelm.

    Tenino was the destination of the Northern Pacific Railroad's 65-mile Pacific Division line between Kalama and Tenino as early as 1872. In 1874, a 40-mile line was built through Yelm to Commencement Bay in Tacoma; this line operated as a Burlington Northern line until the late 1980s. Tenino, known as the Stone City, built a sandstone depot, now the Tenino Depot Museum, in 1914 along the main line from Portland to Tacoma.

    You can start your journey at Tenino City Park, adjacent to a campground. After running past a few homes, a ballpark, and restrooms, the route begins to parallel State Route 507. The forested path then crosses Military Road to rise above SR 507. The road is never far, but a swath of fir and maple trees provides a barrier. A historical kiosk precedes 1 mile of scenic forest trail beside McIntosh Lake, where herons come to watch trail users.

    At 6.5 miles, you'll reach the intersection with the Chehalis Western Trail. The Rainier trailhead lies just 2 miles farther. The landscape widens as you pass through Wilkowski Park and cross under a trestle. The trail runs closer to the road for the next 5 miles as it approaches Yelm, eventually ending at the trailhead on Railroad Street SW.

  • West Tiger Railroad Grade

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

  • Woodland Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    Commuters move between the cities of Olympia and Lacey along a former Burlington Northern corridor now known as the Woodland Trail. The Chehalis Western Trail runs north and south from the midpoint of the Woodland Trail, forming a county network for commuting and recreation.

    The Northern Pacific Railroad laid its tracks, which were later purchased by the Burlington Northern, into downtown Olympia in 1891. Service was discontinued, and the right-of-way was acquired for trail construction. The city of Olympia manages the southwestern section of the trail, and Lacey manages the northwestern segment.

    The trailhead in Olympia features green architecture, such as a shelter and restroom with solar-tube lighting and a living roof (covered with plants). The parking lot comprises porous pavement, and a rain garden filters storm water. From the trailhead, the route runs northeast on a mild uphill grade, intersecting after 2.5 miles with the Chehalis Western Trail. You'll pass benches and more than 12,000 native tree and shrub plantings. At the four-way intersection of the two trails (the Chehalis Western Trail runs both north and south), an access point leads north to Pacific Avenue and a small retail area.

    The Lacey segment begins here and parallels busy Pacific Avenue through downtown Lacey, reaching the meadows of Woodland Creek Community Park after 2.2 miles. Two busy traffic circles create safety issues for children and inexperienced riders. Use great caution, as traffic enters quickly and drivers may not see you. Recreational riders may consider continuing on the Chehalis Western Trail.

    Once you've passed Carpenter Street, you'll come to the trail's end at Woodland Creek Community Park. Highlights include Woodland Creek, which weaves through the property, as well as Longs Pond (year-round fishing for children age 14 and under), additional trails, and a trestle.

  • Cedar River Trail (WA)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 15.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    The Cedar River Trail follows the old Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad corridor on a straight, flat shot out of the sprawling Seattle metro area and into the rural countryside.

    Beginning at the edge of Renton's historic downtown, the trail rolls upstream along the fast-flowing Cedar River to Landsburg Park. The first 11 miles of the trail, stretching just past the Maple Valley trailhead, are paved. There, the surface turns to packed gravel, and the path begins a winding course through a forested setting to its terminus in Landsburg, about 5 miles away.

    The paved trail starts about a block from the Renton Historical Museum and passes through an open field that, a century ago, housed brick- and conduit-maker Denny–Renton Clay & Coal Co. All that remains today are scattered bricks in the blackberry thickets. Be aware of the trail's 10-mile-per-hour bicycle speed within Renton city limits (violators face a fine up to $101); additionally, trail users on foot and wheel must stay on their side of the yellow line.

    After passing Ron Regis Park, the trail leaves the city limits and is sandwiched between the scenic Cedar River and busy State Route 169/Maple Valley Highway. The river, filled with old snags, meanders through the valley and washes against high sandy bluffs. In the fall, you'll witness a colorful spectacle as thousands of sockeye salmon head up the river to spawn. The bright-red salmon are easily seen from trestles or the scattered county-owned natural areas that dot the river's edge. One such natural area, named Cavanaugh Pond, also is a year-round destination for spotting waterfowl.

    The trail becomes packed gravel after it passes the Maple Valley trailhead. This soft-surface path winds through groves of Douglas fir, western red cedar, bigleaf maple, and alder on the way to the Landsburg trailhead.

    Back where the trail turns to gravel, you'll pass the 3.5-mile

    City of Snoqualmie Centennial Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Snoqualimie's 0.5-mile, paved trail runs parallel to railroad tracks and SR 202 through downtown Snoqualmie. The trail scenic trail provides a nice break for a short walk.

  • East Lake Sammamish Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    The East Lake Sammamish Trail is an important link in the Mountains to Sound Greenway, a 1.5 million–acre landscape stretching from Seattle to Central Washington. Its origins hail from the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway, whose line along the eastern shore of Squak Lake (now Lake Sammamish) greatly aided in the development of Seattle during its brief run in the late 1800s.

    Eleven miles of level trail through three suburban cities grant access to the shores of Lake Sammamish. Currently, the trail consists of a total of 6 paved miles, located at either end of the trail, with crushed rock and stone making up the middle sections (plans are under way for these sections to be paved by 2017). Trail sections are closed and paved segment by segment; however, there is a nearby parkway with a wide shoulder. Use caution, and be alert for passing vehicles.

    From the NE 70th Street lot in Redmond (adjacent to cafés and a hotel), the trail crosses several streets and a spur trail to massive Marymoor Park, home to an outdoor velodrome. The spur delivers you through the park to the Sammamish River Trail, which then links to the Burke-Gilman Trail stretching into Seattle. Bypassing the spur to Marymoor, head 1.2 miles along the trail to Sammamish Landing, a lovely waterfront park (with a restroom) where you can swim, fish, or stretch out on the grass. If you take the dirt track below the park gazebo, you'll find pocket beaches; you can return to the trail via a short, steep incline.

    The tree-lined corridor proceeds above lakefront homes and below the mostly muffled sounds of East Lake Sammamish Parkway NE, with views of the hills across the lake. The paved trail gives way to a 4.8-mile journey on crushed rock. An uphill spur

  • Interurban Trail (North)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 24 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Interurban Trail between Seattle and Everett stitches together a dense residential and commercial patchwork that the original electric railway helped to grow in the early part of the 20th century. The 24-mile trail also goes through the communities of Shoreline, Mountlake Terrace, Edmonds, and Lynnwood. It skirts two regional malls (Alderwood and Everett), a casino, and an abandoned drive-in theater, among other businesses.

    The corridor for the Seattle-Everett Traction Company was considered remote when it launched service in 1910. As growth mushroomed after World War I, commuter and mercantile traffic switched to cars and trucks on new roads, and the railway (then owned by Puget Sound Power & Light Company) folded in 1939. Snohomish County, Lynnwood, and Everett pooled their resources to create the first 11.8 miles of trail in the mid-1990s. More trail gaps are closed every few years.

    The rail-trail is a 10- to 12-foot-wide paved path that travels through park or greenbelt settings. Several long sections roll adjacent to noisy Interstate 5, which took the place of the railway corridor. Anyone traveling the entire distance, however, will stumble across a dozen gaps where the marked Interurban Trail detours onto bike lanes, wide shoulders, low-traffic streets, and sidewalks.

    Starting in northwest Seattle, you'll pass several examples of trailside art, including some depicting a volcano erupting, an elk sprouting horns, and other scenes in a series of sequential signs. The trail section ends at a two-way cycle track on Linden Avenue with automatic crossing signals for bicycles.

    The trail resumes through the commercial center of Shoreline and ends at picturesque Echo Lake. From here, it follows a 1-mile detour onto bike lanes and a path to the Lake Ballinger Station trailhead, which features a historical exhibit of the railway. As with all trail detours, look for the distinctive Interurban Trail signs showing a red arrow on a

  • Foothills Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 30 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel

    The Foothills Trail is a 30-mile collection of six unconnected segments of the old Burlington Northern Railway that served the farming, coal-mining, and logging economies near the base of Mount Rainier.

    The longest section is a paved trail that rolls for 15.1 miles between the outskirts of Puyallup to South Prairie. Other paved, gravel, and dirt segments are located in Enumclaw, Buckley, and Wilkeson, as well as an isolated 1.3-mile asphalt trail with four bridges in an area known as Cascade Junction. Plans call for connecting all these pieces.

    The Northern Pacific Railway Company laid its tracks from Tacoma to the coalfields around Wilkeson in 1877. In 1970, the railroad merged into Burlington Northern, which ceased using the lines in 1982. Two years later, residents began working to create the Foothills Trail.

    Puyallup to South Prairie
    The most popular trail is the Puyallup-South Prairie piece. It boasts four trailheads along the route at East Puyallup, McMillin, Orting, and South Prairie, in addition to other parking.

    Here, you'll pass through farmland that once produced 60 million daffodil bulbs annually. All that remains of that era is the annual Daffodil Festival, as well as that bloom's depictions on signs and even a sculpture along the route. About halfway, the town of Orting offers a bike shop, cafés, bakeries, and more.

    Later, the trail crosses the Carbon River that runs milky white from a melting glacier on Mount Rainier. The active volcano's white summit is visible most of the way. It's responsible for making this perhaps the only rail-trail posted with lahar warning signs, which direct trail users to head for the hills to escape volcanic mudflow in the event of seismic activity.

    A picnic shelter set up by a local roadside coffee stand welcomes trail users to the endpoint in South Prairie. Pierce County acquired a piece of right-of-way here in 2013 that can be used to extend

  • Rainier Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Rainier Trail brings trail users from the 11-mile East Lake Sammamish Trail south through downtown Issaquah. The paved trail provides access to a number of recreational, cultural and civic amenities, including a local community center, senior center, baseball diamond, skate park and City Hall. Because it directly leads to Issaquah Middle School and Issaquah High School, the trail is also a safe route to school for many of the city’s young residents.

    One of the more interesting portions of the trail’s route is its alignment adjacent to the Issaquah Valley Trolley near the restored Issaquah Depot. The old train station is now a museum featuring exhibits on the local railroad history. The operating trolley was introduced as a popular addition to the museum in 2001 and continues to run on Saturdays and Sundays from April through September. The fare is by donation, which also grants access to the Issaquah Depot Museum.

  • Issaquah-Preston Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    Suburban sprawl gives way to deep forest and rural farm lots as this rail-trail follows an uphill grade from Issaquah to the outskirts of Preston. The Issaquah–Preston Trail is among a group of trails in the Mountains to Sound Greenway that link Seattle and its eastern suburbs with Eastern Washington. It roughly follows the original route of the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway that was purchased by Northern Pacific at the close of the 19th century and was completely inactive by the early 1980s.

    The Issaquah-Preston Trail begins at a junction with the East Lake Sammamish Trail, about 0.2 mile north of the latter trail's Issaquah endpoint. Starting as a paved trail, the Issaquah-Preston Trail crosses East Lake Sammamish Parkway at a crosswalk and traffic light and then proceeds uphill, where its role as a commuter and recreation route is evident. To reach Preston, you'll follow the left fork at a trail junction and enter a short tunnel; the right fork ascends to homes, stores, and offices in the Issaquah Highlands development.

    Another trail junction confronts visitors after the tunnel. The left branch proceeds to Preston, while the right heads downhill to historic downtown Issaquah. The paved surface ends after the second trail fork, and the subsequent packed dirt and gravel trail can be uneven and muddy at times. It becomes a wide forest path canopied by second-growth Douglas firs and western red cedars as it passes through a section of Grand Ridge Park while noisy Interstate 90 traffic rolls past downhill. Nearly 10 miles of popular mountain biking trails in the 1,300-acre forest can be reached from the Coal Mine and Grand Ridge trailheads (maps are displayed on posts) in this section.

    Passing through the forest, the path crosses a classic wooden bridge over East Fork Issaquah Creek and emerges at a small parking lot on SE High Point Way. Across this

  • Interurban Trail (South)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 18.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Interurban Trail (South) connects several towns south of Seattle along the historic route of the Puget Sound Electric Railway. The trolley ran between Tacoma and Seattle from 1902 to 1928, falling victim to the growing popularity of cars and trucks and the construction of State Route 99. Its cousin—now the Interurban Trail (North)—ran between Seattle and Everett and survived until 1939.

    The 18.1-mile trail runs nearly straight and flat for 14.8 miles from its beginning in the north near Fort Dent Park. The route connects the towns of Tukwila, Kent, Auburn, Algona, and Pacific, making it popular with commuting bicyclists. Two unattached segments in Edgewood and Milton follow the old railway corridor toward Tacoma.

    Starting at the parking lot at Fort Dent Park, follow the River Trail signs across a small bridge, and take the Green River Trail to the Interurban Trail intersection. After crossing under Interstate 405, the paved trail rolls alongside the BNSF Railway and beneath Puget Sound Energy power lines on steel utility poles that march south for miles. The route passes sprawling commercial and light industrial areas in Tukwila and Kent with access to employers and shopping malls, though the trail avoids the hustle and bustle of the congested roads.

    Drainage ditches account for natural habitat next to the trail and provide nesting for ducks and marsh birds. On clear days, 14,410-foot Mount Rainier is visible to the south. After passing the outskirts of downtown Kent, the Interurban Trail meets the Green River Trail again. Following this path to the right provides a winding, 11-mile scenic route back to Fort Dent atop a river levee.

    The surroundings become more agricultural after a rail yard (watch for unmanned locomotives), and you might hear a crowd roaring as you pass

  • John Wayne Pioneer Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 253 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Crushed Stone, Sand

    Spanning an estimated 253 miles, the John Wayne Pioneer Trail is the longest rail-trail conversion in the United States. Much of it is so remote and desolate, however, that weeks will pass in some sections where the only visitors are coyotes, black-tailed jackrabbits, or gopher snakes.

    Anyone traveling the entire length of the trail will experience many landscapes: mountains, dense forests, irrigated farmland, arid scrubland, and the rolling hills of the Palouse region. The route crosses the Cascade Mountains in a 2.3-mile-long, unlit tunnel and traverses numerous canyons and rivers via bridges and trestles that offer spectacular views.

    The trail follows the corridor of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad, also known as the Milwaukee Road. Workers completed the railroad's rugged western mainline that connected Chicago with Seattle and Tacoma in 1909. By 1980, the railroad had ceased operations on the right-of-way. The state acquired most of the corridor and named it for John Wayne after a lobbying campaign by outdoorsman Chic Hollenbeck, a big fan of the cowboy actor. Hollenbeck also founded the John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders Association, whose members make an annual trek along the trail by wagon and horseback.

    The western segment of the John Wayne Pioneer Trail between Cedar Falls and the Columbia River runs through Iron Horse State Park, a 110-mile-long linear park. The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) manages the trail between the Columbia River and Lind, and the remainder from Lind to the Idaho border falls once again to the oversight of Washington State Parks.

    Through most of Iron Horse State Park, the trail surface comprises well-packed crushed rock, except for the 20 miles of loose sand in the U.S. Army Yakima Training Center. Note: As of 2015, this section of trail between the Army West trailhead near Kittitas and the Army East trailhead near the Columbia River was closed due

  • Necklace Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 7.5 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    From Mt. Baker-Snoqualamie National Forest:
    The first 1.5 miles of the trail follows an old railroad grade, then enters Alpine Lakes Wilderness. Once crossing the river at milepost 5.0, the trail becomes very steep and rough, climbing 2,550 feet in 2.2 miles. There are campsites available on the river at milepost 5.0, and in Necklace Valley at Jade, Emerald, Ilswoot, Opal, and Cloudy, Al, Locket, and Jewel Lakes. Necklace Valley is a fragile sub-alpine valley with extensive meadows.
  • Preston-Snoqualmie Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 6.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The 6.5-mile paved Preston-Snoqualmie Trail meanders through Snoqualmie Valley, with a short roadside section and crossing. It crosses a set of unpaved yet accommodating switchbacks that replace a trestle from the old Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railway. This inserts a brief walk that works fine with a road bike.

    The main trail leaves the Preston trailhead on a gradual, steady coast to the Raging River Valley. Preston is a historic mill town named after railway official William Preston. The area offers quiet distractions, such as an inviting grassy pullout and bench and a bridge, framed by evergreens and cedars above and the ravine below. The trail grade increases and suddenly curves sharply, steeply, and briefly toward the road at 2.5 miles. A final leveling out allows a semicivilized descent.

    A crosswalk and sign guide you across speedy Preston–Fall City Road to one block of separated trail, which then takes you left onto SE 68th Street to a mossy bridge overlooking the river. This pleasant, short street rises to the road (with cement barriers for 0.25 mile). Abandon the road to welcome the attractive configuration of switchbacks. Climb 80 feet on grass and gravel to a well-placed bench. This older paved trail hosts a unique log chair and a bridge high above a creek.

    Next stop is the Lake Alice trailhead and picnic area at 3.5 miles. Parking at this trailhead offers a trip on a gentle, paved grade in either direction. From here, the trail continues 1.8 miles across Lake Alice Road. Three benches at the end of the trail provide the perfect spot to enjoy a densely framed view across Snoqualmie Falls and the river to the impressive Salish Lodge. The dense foliage of summer obstructs the view of the 270-foot waterfall, so you might want to check out this trail in fall and winter.

  • Seattle Waterfront Pathway

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The highly urban Seattle Waterfront Pathway is a continuation of the Elliot Bay Trail and carries on south from Broad Street south to South Royal Brougham Way. The trail parallels Alaskan Way along Elliot Bay, past ferry terminals, cruise ship docks, restaurants, the aquarium, and a park. It's a great place for watching cruise ships in this vibrant city.

  • Sylvia Creek Forestry Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel

    The Sylvia Creek Forestry Trail is located in Lake Sylvia State Park north of Montesano on Washington's Olympic Peninsula. The interpretive trail winds through the deep forest and alongside scenic creeks and ponds. The trail follows an old logging railroad line along the west shore of the lake, leaving from the boat launch. You can combine it with other trails to loop around the lake. It's a great place for watching wildlife, especially birds, and peaceful retreat. Download the interpretive brochure (link to the right) for a description of what to see along the way.

  • PROJECT: Eastside Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 42 miles
    Surface:

    The 42-mile corridor that extends from Renton to Snohomish is now under public ownership. Last December, the Port of Seattle purchased the BNSF Eastside Rail Corridor, with King County purchasing a trail easement and becoming the trail sponsor. Eastside Trail Advocates is an advocacy group pushing for a trail along the length of the rail line.

    From the King County Rail Trail page -
    King County will lease the corridor from the Port of Seattle for interim use as a regional trail. From mile post 5 in Renton to mile post 25 in Woodinville, King County will construct "the granddaddy of all regional trails," knitting together all of the communities of east side of King County into an active transportation and recreation system unmatched anywhere in the nation.

    A once in a lifetime opportunity, the Eastside Rail Corridor represents a trail backbone that connects all other regional trails including:

    * 27 miles - Burke-Gilman Trail (including Sammamish River Trail)
    * 11 miles - East Lake Sammamish Trail
    * 16 miles - Cedar River Trail
    * 4 miles - Soos Creek Trail
    * 29 miles - Snoqualmie Valley Trail, and
    * 12 miles  Green River Trail
    * 14 miles  Interurban Trail
    * 17 miles - Centennial Trail in Snohomish County

    The northern section, from mile post 26 in Woodinville to mile post 38 at the City of Snohomish, will remain an active freight line and potential future route of the Spirit of Washington Dinner Train.

    The transaction continued the process that began in 2003 when BNSF announced its intention to sell the corridor. In partnership with the Port of Seattle, King County acted to prevent the corridor from being broken up and sold for private development. In 2007, the Port of Seattle agreed to purchase the rail corridor and lease the southern portion of the corridor to King County for both use as a trail and possibly an Eastside transportation corridor.

    Now that the initial
  • Elliott Bay Trail (Terminal 91 Bike Path)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Elliott Bay offers trail users the opportunity to enjoy art, history, and a wide variety of outdoor activities in a beautiful waterfront setting. Myrtle Edwards Park is adjacent to the Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle Art Museum, and a public fishing pier, while Elliott Bay Marina and Smith Cove Park boast beautiful mountain views. Creative trail bridges facilitate access to city streets for recreation and commuting.

    To reach the Terminal 91 Bike Path, park at Elliott Bay Marina, and head downhill past the parking lots to Smith Cove Park. Here, you'll be treated to bay views of the Ferris wheel and stadium, dwarfed by Mount Rainier. This is also the site of the once-active Northern Pacific coal bunker pier—a 2,500-foot trestle constructed in 1891—replaced in 1899 by Great Northern Railroad Piers 88 and 89. In 1921, the Port of Seattle built Piers 40 and 41 (later renumbered to 90 and 91), which—at 2,530 feet—were acknowledged to be the longest concrete piers in the world.

    Signs direct you toward a fenced pathway and past 20th Avenue W., which leads to the Ballard Locks. Beside active BNSF Railway tracks, a steep overpass suggests walking your bike or sidestepping your skates down the very narrow descent. After crossing a set of tracks, you'll arrive at the civilized and scenic trail beside the West Galer Street parking area at 1.75 miles. (Park here to avoid the Terminal 91 section.)

    Once in Myrtle Edwards Park, you'll pass a public fishing pier and a grain terminal. A grassy area with benches and landscape art separates pedestrian and wheeled paths. Beginner skaters can expect a bit of buckled pavement and a few curves. An impressive bridge rises above the park to a Puget Sound viewpoint before the trail exits by stairway to Elliott Avenue W. and by ramp to Third Avenue W., with a signed route to Seattle Center. The bayside rocks, benches, and grassy areas invite a break before you reach Olympic Sculpture Park.

  • Ship Canal Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Across the waterway from its big brother (the Burke-Gilman Trail), the Ship Canal Trail runs along the southern edge of the Lake Washington Ship Canal near Seattle Pacific University. The trail links the Burke-Gilman Trail via the Fremont Avenue Bridge with the bike path on W. Emerson Place near Fishermen's Terminal.

    The completion of the trail to its current western terminus makes it possible for intrepid bikers and runners to travel from Redmond to downtown Seattle almost entirely on non-motorized paths. The Ship Canal Trail is popular with dog-walkers and joggers.

  • Scott Pierson Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Scott Pierson Trail runs parallel to State Route 16 for most of its journey from 25th Street in Tacoma to 24th Street on the southern edge of Gig Harbor. The 5-mile trail is a safe and convenient option for bicyclists and pedestrians to cross Puget Sound, although it is often loud due to its close proximity to a busy highway.

    The trail is named in honor of the longtime landscape architect and urban planner in Tacoma who advocated tirelessly for its creation. The highlight of the route is undoubtedly the impressive Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which offers sweeping views of Puget Sound as it carries separated vehicular and bike/ped traffic from Tacoma to the Kitsap Peninsula, and vice versa.

    In Tacoma, the trail links walkers, runners and cyclists to a variety of amenities, including War Memorial Park, the Tacoma Nature Center at Snake Lake and Cheney Stadium (home of Minor League Baseball's Tacoma Rainiers). Unfortunately, the trail is not always well-marked in Tacoma. Refer to the TrailLink map for the exact route.
  • Chief Sealth Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Chief Sealth Trail runs north–south along Seattle's southeast side between S. Ferdinand Street at Beacon Avenue S. and S. Gazelle Street at 51st Avenue S. The paved trail provides access to neighborhoods, shopping, schools and businesses. The trail meanders along a greenway corridor in the Beacon Hill area among landscaped mounds and includes signage as well as gravel shoulders for runners.

    There are several confusing intersections along the trail: Heading south, at Dawson Street, the trail continues kitty-corner across Beacon Street. At Juneau Street, head east a few hundred yards and you'll see the trail again going south. Continuing south, where the trail curves east to 30th Avenue, head south on 30th, across Graham Street and you'll see the trail again next to the house. Farther south at Myrtle Place, cross Myrtle at the intersection and continue under the power lines. A short stretch of dirt path leads south to where the trail is paved again (near Webster St.). Alternatively, you can take Myrtle west to 33rd Street then head south on 33rd to S. Webster; go east toward the power lines to pick up the trail again.

    The Chief Sealth Trail was largely built from recycled materials—mostly soil from excavated street trenches and crushed concrete from excavated city streets. Eventually, it will connect to the future Mountains-to-Sound Greenway on Beacon Hill and light rail stations on Martin Luther King Jr. Way. There are also plans to connect the trail to downtown Seattle.

  • Cushman Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Gig Harbor's Cushman Trail is a paved, non-motorized route for pedestrian and bike use. The trail shares much of its corridor with overhead Tacoma Power electric lines. Along the way, trail users will traverse several large hills through areas of scenic beauty.

    In the north, the trail winds through Wilkinson Farm Park on a pin pile bridge to minimize the impact to the natural wetlands. An on-road segment near the trail's midpoint connects bikers and pedestrians to Gig Harbor's Pierce Transit Park and Ride lot on Kimball Drive. In the south, the trail parallels State Route 16 before ending less than a mile west of Puget Sound.
  • I-90 Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 8.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Scenic and interesting are uncommon terms used to describe a trail alongside a busy freeway, but the I-90 Trail in Washington is different. The trail begins in the west in Seattle and runs for 10 miles across Lake Washington and Mercer Island to the Mercer Slough Nature Park in Bellevue. Across that distance, trail users get to traverse both the box girder East Channel Bridge and the floating Homer M. Hadley Memorial Bridge, explore two parks on lids over the freeway and take in the views along the massive lake.

    Bikers and pedestrians also get to use a unique separated tunnel below residences and parks but above the deeper I-90 vehicular travel lanes in eastern Seattle. Despite the trail's name, the busy highway is generally only visible on the two bridges and where the road emerges from underneath the lids. Elsewhere, vehicles are hidden behind landscaped sound walls, beneath the lid parks or in the tunnel.

  • North Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 7.25 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt

    The North Creek Trail links the cities of Bothell, Mill Creek and Everett, as well as the communities in between. The trail also provides access to the Sammamish River Trail. The trail follows a wooded corridor with some gentle hills interspersed with wetlands-great for bird-watching. As of autumn 2011 the trail is broken into two disjointed segments.

    The northern segment in Mill Creek runs for 2.5 miles between McCollum Pioneer Park off Route 96 and 164th St. SE. The Bothell segment runs for nearly 5 miles from north of Bothell at 214th St. SE south to the Sammamish River Trail just south of Route 522.

    Another segment is in the works that will join the short distance between 208th Street SE and Bothell Everett Highway/SR 527 at 214th Street. In the meantime, to join the two segments cyclists must use on-street bike lanes on Bothell Everett Highway/SR-527. Note, these lanes in both directions are poorly marked (as of April 2011) and the segment of the highway between 214th St SE and 164th St SE has heavy traffic.

  • Tolt Pipeline Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 17.4 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel, Sand

    The Tolt Pipeline Trail serves as a major connection between Duvall, Washington, and the Sammamish River in Bothell. The trail follows a water pipeline right-of-way and is not recommended for all trail users. The majority of traffic consists of mountain bikers and horseback riders. Due to the many steep grades along the trail, as well as the gravel and dirt surface, bicyclists must be aware of the limitations of their equipment.

    Conveniently, the Tolt Pipeline Trail's western terminus in Blyth Park ends very close to both the Sammamish River Trail and the Burke-Gilman Trail. It moves eastward on an ungraded surface, making the many hill climbs an intense workout. Additionally, the wide cut of the pipeline's right of way (up to 100 feet) provides little escape from the sun.

    At West Snoqualmie Valley Road NE, riders can continue via street access to Duvall's portion of the Tolt Pipeline Trail at nearby Duvall Park. Just to the west of the park, the trail directly connects to the Snoqualmie Valley Trail.

  • West Campus Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.04 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The West Campus Trail provides access from the BPA Trail to Federal Way's West Campus medical centers. The short trail also offers the many surrounding neighborhoods a safe off-street connection to the highlights along the BPA Trail, including Celebration Park (soccer fields, baseball diamonds, general recreation) and the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center.

  • BPA Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.83 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Meandering down a Bonneville Power Administration overhead electric utility corridor, the BPA Trail serves as a connector between Celebration Park and the downtown areas of Federal Way with its southwestern neighborhoods. The trail runs behind offices in the city, providing an opportunity for non-motorized commuting.

    There are also frequent access points to neighborhoods, highlighting the trail's usefulness as a commuting corridor for outlying neighborhoods. Near the BPA Trail's midpoint, the West Campus Trail branches off as a 1-mile spur, providing access to more of Federal Way's residences and medical offices.

  • Green-to-Cedar Rivers Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.75 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    The Green-to-Cedar Rivers Trail is an extension of the Cedar River Trail, which heads south from Witte Road where the two trails intersect. The Green-to-Cedar Rivers Trail passes through Lake Wilderness Park on its way through the Maple Valley to SE 276th Street.

  • Soos Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Soos Creek Trail travels through heavily wooded forest on a north-south route spanning the eastern edge of the Seattle suburb of Kent. Following the path of its namesake creek, the trail begins just a short distance from scenic Lake Meridian in the south and travels northward towards its ultimate terminus at Meeker Middle School.

    The trail is paved over its entire length, and an adjacent soft surface path for equestrian use parallels the trail at times. Near the trail's midpoint at SE 216th Street, bikers, walkers and runners can continue west to the 9-mile Lake Youngs Trail, which encircles the large lake with an unpaved path.

    Plans are in motion to extend the Soos Creek Trail north for an additional 4 miles to ultimately connect to the existing Cedar Creek Trail in Renton.

  • Alki Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Alki Trail rides along the northern and eastern shore of West Seattle along Alki Avenue. Largely riding on a widened sidewalk, separated from traffic by a parking lane and curb, traffic on the trail is separated for bikes and walkers, providing a less stressful experience for walkers and bikers alike. As the trail turns south, it runs inland toward the West Seattle bridge, which it traverses with a separated biking lane. With a tricky intersection along West Seattle Bridge, as well as high car traffic, this portion should be handled with great caution.

  • PROJECT: North Creek Trail (Connection Project)

    State: WA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface:

    Snohomish County is moving on efforts to close the gap between the two completed portions of the North Creek Trail. In late 2009, Snohomish County began Phase I of its plan to build a section of North Creek Trail between Filbert Road and North Creek Park (183rd Street SE) west of the Bothell-Everett Highway. The trail will be part of a coordinated regional system that will eventually connect the Sammamish River/Burke-Gillman Trail in King County with the Snohomish County Regional Interurban Trail in Everett.

    Phase I of the project consists of identifying a preferred alternative and purchasing the necessary right-of-way, which is expected to be completed before the end of 2014. Funds for Phase I, including the purchase of land for the trail, were provided by King County in accordance with the mitigation agreement for the Brightwater treatment facility located in south Snohomish County. The county is currently seeking funding for construction of the trail. On November 16, 2011, Snohomish County will hold an open house meeting to show alternatives for the north section of the trail and the recommended West Alignment for the section of the trail south of 192nd Street SE.

    In response to additional citizen comments, the County has identified two additional alternatives for the section of trail between 192nd Street SE and 183rd Street SE. The three alternatives, along with their pros and cons, will be on display at the November 2011 meeting. Comments from citizens will be used to select the final alignment north of 192nd Street SE.

    The West Alignment south of 192nd Street SE will provide the opportunity for a trail that meets WSDOT's standard of 12 feet in width for a multi-use pedestrian trail and will provide a unique opportunity to experience a natural environment in the middle of an urban area. As Snohomish County continues to develop in the future, opportunities to create these types of regional trails will be more difficult. It is the objectiv
  • Ruston Way Path

    State: WA
    Length: 2.53 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The delightful Ruston Way Path sits in the Old Town neighborhood of northern Tacoma. Its linear, flat and paved nature make it a cinch for all travelers and it offers lovely views of Commencement Bay, sandy beaches and majestic Mount Rainier.

    The trail begins in Jack Hyde Park and continues northwest along its namesake roadway through a series of small waterfront parks, where you'll find great places to stop and enjoy the scenery or take part in more active pursuits, such as scuba diving, kayaking or fishing. If you need refreshments, several restaurants also line the path.

    Not far from the Les Davis Pier (3427 Ruston Way), you'll come across the landlocked Fireboat No. 1. The boat, bright red and 96 feet in length, was built in 1929 and is designated a National Historic Landmark.

    The pathway ends at the former American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) site, originally built in the late 1800s and closed in the 1980s. Since then, this EPA-designated Superfund site has been undergoing remediation with plans to make it a mixed-use community area.
  • Puyallup Riverwalk Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Puyallup Riverwalk Trail traces the tree-lined shoreline in northern Puyallup, a few miles southeast of Tacoma. The paved pathway consists of two completed segments with about a mile of residential roadway and sidewalks in between. As you travel alongside River Road, you'll catch glimpses of the water on one side and commercial areas on the other. A mall at the Meridian Avenue crossing offers places to stop and eat.

    The trail ends on the outskirts of Sumner. From here, the adventurous can continue their journey on the Foothills Trail. From the Riverwalk's eastern-most endpoint, cross under Main Avenue and go south on 134th Avenue through rural landscapes for about 1 mile to make the connection just off 80th Street. The scenic rail-trail stretches about 15 miles through the towns of Alderton, Orting and South Prairie.
  • Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop

    State: WA
    Length: 3.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Seattle's Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop offers scenic views of Lake Union, as well as access to parks, neighborhoods, and downtown shops and restaurants. A good place to begin your journey is at Lake Union Park at the lake's southern tip. The park offers picnic areas, a boat launch, and views of several historic ships. From the park, you can head northwest on an off-road trail that follows the western shore of the lake.

    At the northwestern corner of the lake, cross the Fremont Bridge to connect to the Burke-Gilman Trail, a member of RTC's Rail-Trail Hall of Fame, which will take you across the northern end of the lake. You can complete the 6-mile loop around the lake by crossing University Bridge and traveling south on-road along Fairview Avenue.

  • Grandview Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.25 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Grandview Trail runs in a straight line for more than a mile on the eastern edge of Pierce County's Chambers Creek Regional Park. The trail appropriately never strays too far from Grandview Drive.

    Living up to its name, the trail offers stunning views of the adjacent Chambers Bay public golf course (site of the U.S. Open in 2015), Puget Sound and distant islands from its position on a 200-foot bluff. At both ends of the trail, bikers and pedestrians can pick up the longer Soundview Trail, allowing for a scenic trail loop through the park.

  • Redmond Central Connector

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Redmond Central Connector will one day stretch 4 miles along a former rail line, the Redmond Spur of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad.

    Currently, one mile is complete in downtown Redmond from the Bear Creek Trail to the Sammamish River Trail. For its full length, the trail parallels the East Link light rail. Along the paved pathway, you’ll find public art and the Redmond Town Center, which offers shops, restaurants, and entertainment. The trail ends at the Bear Creek Park, a lush oasis in the heart of the city.

    The second phase of the trail—another mile connecting to the Willows business district—is expected to be completed in 2015.

  • Des Moines Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Des Moines Creek Trail offers a nice connection between the south side of Seattle and the waterfront community of Des Moines on Puget Sound. The paved trail begins just south of the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and winds through the pleasantly wooded Des Moines Creek Park along a burbling creek down to the city's marina, descending slightly as it approaches the water.

    The park offers basic amenities, such as benches, picnic tables, and drinking fountains, as well as a network of mountain biking trails to explore. On the trail's southern end, enjoy a stroll over the water on the long pier. You can also continue your journey south on a shared-road bike route on Marine View Drive about 2 miles to Saltwater State Park, where you'll find sandy beaches, tide pools, and a scuba diving reef.

  • Bear Creek Trail (WA)

    State: WA
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    In the heart of Redmond, the Bear Creek Trail provides an important connection between two rail-trails. On its eastern end it connects to the Sammamish River Trail and, on its western side to the Redmond Central Connector. The trail itself is pleasant and tree-lined as it winds along its namesake creek just south of Redmond Town Center, which offers shops, restaurants, and entertainment.

  • Sumner Link Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Sumner Link Trail provides an important connection between the Interurban Trail and the Puyallup Riverwalk Trail. Along the way, the trail follows the White River, offering views of the water, meadows, and farm fields. Note that a portion of the route—along Fryar Avenue—is on-road.

  • Marymoor Connector Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Although short, the Marymoor Connector Trail provides an important link between the Sammamish River Trail (an 11-mile route that heads north to Bothell and the Burke-Gilman Trail) and the East Lake Sammamish Trail (which heads 11 miles south to Issaquah). All are part of a vast and growing regional network of trails stretching from Puget Sound to the Cascade Mountains.

    The trail's route across Redmond's Marymoor Park is pleasant and paved, but does not offer much shade.

  • Cross Kirkland Corridor

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.8 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Gravel

    True to its name, the Cross Kirkland Corridor traverses the city for nearly six miles, connecting eight neighborhoods, four major business districts, more than a dozen parks, and several public schools. Google, a major employer in the area, has an adjacent campus near the trail’s southern end in the Houghton neighborhood.

    The rail-trail is part of the developing 42-mile Eastside Rail Trail network, stretching from Renton to Snohomish. The railroad line was built in 1904 to haul coal and lumber, but later expanded to agricultural and industrial freight. In Kirkland, the rails and ties were removed in 2013 and the city is working to convert the original ballast surface (large rocks) to crushed gravel in two phases beginning in 2014.

    The trail has the level grade of a typical rail-trail, is well-marked, and has many well-shaded sections.

  • Prairie Line Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.3 miles
    Surface: Concrete, Crushed Stone

    The Prairie Line Trail will run through downtown Tacoma along the former Northern Pacific Railroad that was established here in 1873. Tacoma was the terminus of the rail line that stretched all the way to the Great Lakes.

    The first of three phases opened in September 2014 and travels down the center of the University of Washington’s Tacoma campus. The trail is a beauty with a section of elegant gray-and-white brick. Ornamental trees, rain gardens, and other landscaping add to the trail's visual appeal.

    Eventually, the rail-trail will extend to the Brewery District, Museum District, the Thea Foss Waterway, and the Water Ditch Trail.

  • Lowell Riverfront Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.75 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel

    The Lowell Riverfront Trail is a multi-use trail located within Rotary Park. The paved trail travels from the park entrance to the north end following the Snohomish River. You can encounter numerous wildlife such as owls, river otters, orioles, and eagles. Amenities such as picnic tables, restrooms, water, and fishing are also available.While you are enjoying the trail you can also take in sights of Mt. Baker, Rainier and the Cascades.