• Alki Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Alki Trail rides along the northern and eastern shore of West Seattle along Alki Avenue. Largely riding on a widened sidewalk, separated from traffic by a parking lane and curb, traffic on the trail is separated for bikes and walkers, providing a less stressful experience for walkers and bikers alike. As the trail turns south, it runs inland toward the West Seattle bridge, which it traverses with a separated biking lane. With a tricky intersection along West Seattle Bridge, as well as high car traffic, this portion should be handled with great caution.

  • BPA Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.83 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Meandering down a Bonneville Power Administration overhead electric utility corridor, the BPA Trail serves as a connector between Celebration Park and the downtown areas of Federal Way with its southwestern neighborhoods. The trail runs behind offices in the city, providing an opportunity for non-motorized commuting.

    There are also frequent access points to neighborhoods, highlighting the trail's usefulness as a commuting corridor for outlying neighborhoods. Near the BPA Trail's midpoint, the West Campus Trail branches off as a 1-mile spur, providing access to more of Federal Way's residences and medical offices.

  • Bear Creek Trail (WA)

    State: WA
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    In the heart of Redmond, the Bear Creek Trail provides an important connection between two rail-trails. On its eastern end it connects to the Sammamish River Trail and, on its western side to the Redmond Central Connector. The trail itself is pleasant and tree-lined as it winds along its namesake creek just south of Redmond Town Center, which offers shops, restaurants, and entertainment.

  • Burke-Gilman Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 18.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Burke-Gilman Trail, managed by the city of Seattle and King County, stretches from Puget Sound east to Bothell. Built in the 1970s along part of the original Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway corridor (later Northern Pacific and then Burlington Northern), the paved Burke-Gilman was among the first rail-trails and helped inspire dozens of similar projects around the country.

    The western terminus begins at the south end of Golden Gardens Park on Puget Sound and heads south toward Salmon Bay. This short segment (about 2 miles) ends at Ballard Locks, along NW 54th Street just west of 34th Avenue NW. From here, cyclists will have to ride on road to the next segment, which picks up again at NW 45th Street and 11th Avenue NW. To get here, take NW Market Street to Shilshole Avenue to NW 45th Street.

    From here the Burke-Gilman Trail follows the waterway to Gas Works Park on what now becomes the shores of Lake Union. Continuing east, the trail passes through the campus of University of Washington. Both students and the business community account for the trail's popularity as a commuter and recreational opportunity— more than 2,000 people use the Burke-Gilman every day, making it one of the busiest commuter trails in the country.

    Leaving campus the trail continues through suburbia, passing Sand Point, the former Naval Air Station, and Warren G. Magnusson Park. The trail continues along the lake shore, where stops at Matthews Park and, farther 5.5 miles north, Log Boom Park, both with picnicking, restrooms, swimming and other facilities—and both quite crowded with families on summer days.

    From Log Boom to Bothell Park is another 3+ miles. But before you reach the park, just after crossing 96th Avenue NE, the trail forks; take the left one if you want to connect seamlessly to the Sammamish River Trail, which continues another 11 miles to Ki

  • Cedar River Trail (WA)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 15.7 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    The Cedar River Trail follows an old railroad right-of-way from downtown Renton to King County's Landsburg Park, alongside the scenic Cedar River. A greenway branch of the trail (Cedar River to Green River Trail) heads south from Whitte Road and goes another 3.75 miles to SE 276th Street, connecting through Lake Wilderness Park. The first 12.3 miles of the trail from Renton is paved, and the remainder is soft, crushed rock.

  • Chehalis Western Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 21.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Thurston County Parks and Recreation Department acquired 15.5-miles of the Chehalis Western Railroad corridor from Weyerhaeuser Timber Company in 1989 and 1996. The County recently took over the northern 5 miles from Lacey to Woodward Bay and is currently building three bridges over I5, Martin Way, and Pacific to connect the segments together. To navigate this stretch, use the existing at-grade crossing of Pacific Avenue, approximately 100 yards east of where the trail touches the road. After you cross Pacific, continue east another one block until Sleater-Kinney Road. Turn right, or south, and go 100 yards to 12th Avenue. Take a right on 12th and follow until the end (approximately 300 yards). You'll find an "on-ramp" at the end of the road that leads you back to the main trail.

    The line operated from 1926 through the mid-1980's and was used to haul timber from the Bald Hills to Puget Sound mills. The trail runs north-south through the heart of Thurston County and features access to the Puget Sound, Chambers Lake, the Deschutes River, wetlands, forests, prairies and other habitats and scenic views of Mt. Rainier. It also features a scenic overlook at Chambers Lake and an award-winning pedestrian overpass at Yelm Highway. Trailheads are located approximately every two miles on the Thurston County Parks-owned section. The 21.5-mile trail links with the 14.5 mile Yelm-Tenino Trail.
  • Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop

    State: WA
    Length: 3.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Seattle's Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop offers scenic views of Lake Union, as well as access to parks, neighborhoods, and downtown shops and restaurants. A good place to begin your journey is at Lake Union Park at the lake's southern tip. The park offers picnic areas, a boat launch, and views of several historic ships. From the park, you can head northwest on an off-road trail that follows the western shore of the lake.

    At the northwestern corner of the lake, cross the Fremont Bridge to connect to the Burke-Gilman Trail, a member of RTC's Rail-Trail Hall of Fame, which will take you across the northern end of the lake. You can complete the 6-mile loop around the lake by crossing University Bridge and traveling south on-road along Fairview Avenue.

  • Chief Sealth Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Chief Sealth Trail runs north–south along Seattle's southeast side between S. Ferdinand Street at Beacon Avenue S. and S. Gazelle Street at 51st Avenue S. The paved trail provides access to neighborhoods, shopping, schools and businesses. The trail meanders along a greenway corridor in the Beacon Hill area among landscaped mounds and includes signage as well as gravel shoulders for runners.

    There are several confusing intersections along the trail: Heading south, at Dawson Street, the trail continues kitty-corner across Beacon Street. At Juneau Street, head east a few hundred yards and you'll see the trail again going south. Continuing south, where the trail curves east to 30th Avenue, head south on 30th, across Graham Street and you'll see the trail again next to the house. Farther south at Myrtle Place, cross Myrtle at the intersection and continue under the power lines. A short stretch of dirt path leads south to where the trail is paved again (near Webster St.). Alternatively, you can take Myrtle west to 33rd Street then head south on 33rd to S. Webster; go east toward the power lines to pick up the trail again.

    The Chief Sealth Trail was largely built from recycled materials—mostly soil from excavated street trenches and crushed concrete from excavated city streets. Eventually, it will connect to the future Mountains-to-Sound Greenway on Beacon Hill and light rail stations on Martin Luther King Jr. Way. There are also plans to connect the trail to downtown Seattle.

  • City of Snoqualmie Centennial Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Snoqualimie's 0.5-mile, paved trail runs parallel to railroad tracks and SR 202 through downtown Snoqualmie. The trail scenic trail provides a nice break for a short walk.

  • Coal Creek Park Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.7 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt, Grass, Woodchips

    This trail follows along a preserved suburban creek valley through third growth forests once heavily used by the coal mining industry. The east end of the trail enters Cougar Mountain Regional Park, over 3000 acres and 25 additional miles of trails.
  • Cross Kirkland Corridor

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.8 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Gravel

    True to its name, the Cross Kirkland Corridor traverses the city for nearly six miles, connecting eight neighborhoods, four major business districts, more than a dozen parks, and several public schools. Google, a major employer in the area, has an adjacent campus near the trail’s southern end in the Houghton neighborhood.

    The rail-trail is part of the developing 42-mile Eastside Rail Trail network, stretching from Renton to Snohomish. The railroad line was built in 1904 to haul coal and lumber, but later expanded to agricultural and industrial freight. In Kirkland, the rails and ties were removed in 2013 and the city is working to convert the original ballast surface (large rocks) to crushed gravel in two phases beginning in 2014.

    The trail has the level grade of a typical rail-trail, is well-marked, and has many well-shaded sections.

  • Cushman Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Gig Harbor's Cushman Trail is a paved, non-motorized route for pedestrian and bike use. The trail shares much of its corridor with overhead Tacoma Power electric lines. Along the way, trail users will traverse several large hills through areas of scenic beauty.

    In the north, the trail winds through Wilkinson Farm Park on a pin pile bridge to minimize the impact to the natural wetlands. An on-road segment near the trail's midpoint connects bikers and pedestrians to Gig Harbor's Pierce Transit Park and Ride lot on Kimball Drive. In the south, the trail parallels State Route 16 before ending less than a mile west of Puget Sound.
  • Des Moines Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Des Moines Creek Trail offers a nice connection between the south side of Seattle and the waterfront community of Des Moines on Puget Sound. The paved trail begins just south of the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and winds through the pleasantly wooded Des Moines Creek Park along a burbling creek down to the city's marina, descending slightly as it approaches the water.

    The park offers basic amenities, such as benches, picnic tables, and drinking fountains, as well as a network of mountain biking trails to explore. On the trail's southern end, enjoy a stroll over the water on the long pier. You can also continue your journey south on a shared-road bike route on Marine View Drive about 2 miles to Saltwater State Park, where you'll find sandy beaches, tide pools, and a scuba diving reef.

  • Duwamish Bikeway

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.95 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Duwamish Bikeway runs for nearly 3 miles, paralleling Puget Park on the city's southwest side. Along the east side of the trail are highly industrial shipping yards, making this trail more for getting from point A to point B rather than for a pleasant getaway.

  • East Lake Sammamish Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Crushed Stone

    Occupying an old railroad corridor, the East Lake Sammamish Trail follows the eastern shore of Lake Sammamish, from Redmond south to Issaquah. The trail is a work in progress, as paving, access and the installation of amenities will continue into 2012. A 1.2-mile section of trail in Redmond is paved between NE 70th Street south to 187th Street. Closures may be in effect for other paving works, particularly at the Issaquah end in 2012. Once completed, the East Lake Sammamish Trail will be part of a 44-mile corridor from Seattle's Ballard neighborhood to Issaquah. For updates on trail paving and construction of parking and access, visit the King County website.

    The trail intersects with the Issaquah-Preston Trail in Issaquah near I-90.

  • PROJECT: Eastside Rail Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 42 miles
    Surface:

    The 42-mile corridor that extends from Renton to Snohomish is now under public ownership. Last December, the Port of Seattle purchased the BNSF Eastside Rail Corridor, with King County purchasing a trail easement and becoming the trail sponsor. Eastside Trail Advocates is an advocacy group pushing for a trail along the length of the rail line.

    From the King County Rail Trail page -
    King County will lease the corridor from the Port of Seattle for interim use as a regional trail. From mile post 5 in Renton to mile post 25 in Woodinville, King County will construct "the granddaddy of all regional trails," knitting together all of the communities of east side of King County into an active transportation and recreation system unmatched anywhere in the nation.

    A once in a lifetime opportunity, the Eastside Rail Corridor represents a trail backbone that connects all other regional trails including:

    * 27 miles - Burke-Gilman Trail (including Sammamish River Trail)
    * 11 miles - East Lake Sammamish Trail
    * 16 miles - Cedar River Trail
    * 4 miles - Soos Creek Trail
    * 29 miles - Snoqualmie Valley Trail, and
    * 12 miles  Green River Trail
    * 14 miles  Interurban Trail
    * 17 miles - Centennial Trail in Snohomish County

    The northern section, from mile post 26 in Woodinville to mile post 38 at the City of Snohomish, will remain an active freight line and potential future route of the Spirit of Washington Dinner Train.

    The transaction continued the process that began in 2003 when BNSF announced its intention to sell the corridor. In partnership with the Port of Seattle, King County acted to prevent the corridor from being broken up and sold for private development. In 2007, the Port of Seattle agreed to purchase the rail corridor and lease the southern portion of the corridor to King County for both use as a trail and possibly an Eastside transportation corridor.

    Now that the initial
  • Elliott Bay Trail (Terminal 91 Bike Path)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.4 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Elliot Bay Trail winds through two contiguous parks as it passes between the waterfront and the active Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad line. The Myrtle Edwards Park Trail runs parallel to the Elliot Bay Trail within Myrtle Edwards Park. The trail can be accessed from many points along the way and is seperated into different sections for wheels and for pedestrians. The wheels side is plagued with buckling pavement- a problem for beginners. Both trails are narrow but picturesque.

    The trail features a rose garden and stunning views across the bay with spectacular views of sunsets, the Olympic Mountains, and Mount Rainer at various points. The trail provides access to popular bike routes off from 20th Avenue West and is about 1/2 mile away from the Smith Cove Marina restaurants. Along the trail, there is a kiosk outside Smith Cove Park that highlights the area's railroad and shipping history, while the Happy Hooker by the Fishing Pier provides a nice rest stop where there are restrooms and drinking water.

    The trail is fairly flat and wide, yet has one point around Galer Street where the trail becomes bumpy as it crosses old railroad tracks, briefly becomes very narrow, then climbs and decends a steep overpass.

  • Foothills Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 30 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel

    The Foothills Trail follows a former Burlington Northern rail bed, connecting several communities in Pierce and King counties. The rail-trail is paved with a soft shoulder path for equestrians.

    Currently, the longest completed section of the trail stretches from Puyallup through McMillin and Orting to South Prairie. Along the very western end of the trail, it parallels a still-active Burlington Northern track. In a nod to this rail connection, the trailheads in McMillin and South Prairie resemble miniature train stations.

    Near Orting, Mt. Rainier can be seen from a distance and, at some points, the trail gets quite close to Carbon River and South Prairie Creek, offering a pleasant route along the tree-lined waterways and historical railroad trestles across them. About three miles from Orting, a wetland area is well worth a stop, and travelers will find a picnic table and grill there.

    Additional, shorter sections of the trail can be found in Wilkeson, Carbonado, Buckley, and Enumclaw.

    The effort to build the trail started in 1984 when Doug Tait, a Buckley physician and a community visionary, organized the Foothills Rails-to-Trails Coalition to assist Pierce County Parks in its creation.

  • Grandview Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.25 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Grandview Trail runs in a straight line for more than a mile on the eastern edge of Pierce County's Chambers Creek Regional Park. The trail appropriately never strays too far from Grandview Drive.

    Living up to its name, the trail offers stunning views of the adjacent Chambers Bay public golf course (site of the U.S. Open in 2015), Puget Sound and distant islands from its position on a 200-foot bluff. At both ends of the trail, bikers and pedestrians can pick up the longer Soundview Trail, allowing for a scenic trail loop through the park.

  • Green River Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 19.6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Notice: As of April 2014, work is beginning on the Green River levees in Kent that will require closing a section of the Green River Trail for the remainder of 2014. The trail will be closed for about 2.4 miles, between South 180th Street and South 200th Street. For more information, please visit the City of Kent website.


    The Green River Trail currently stretches nearly 20 miles through the industrial heart of the Green River Valley from the southern suburbs of Seattle to Kent, connecting to a number of neighborhoods and parks. As you might expect, the trail follows Washington's scenic Green River for its entire route.

    Direct connections to the Interurban Trail can be found twice along the Green River Trail; the first is in the north near Fort Dent Park and the second is at the trail's southern end near Foster Park on S. 259th Street. The Green River Trail currently ends in the south in Kent's North Green River Park, but long-term plans for the future call for an extension farther south through Auburn to Flaming Geyser State Park.

  • Green-to-Cedar Rivers Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 3.75 miles
    Surface: Gravel

    The Green-to-Cedar Rivers Trail is an extension of the Cedar River Trail, which heads south from Witte Road where the two trails intersect. The Green-to-Cedar Rivers Trail passes through Lake Wilderness Park on its way through the Maple Valley to SE 276th Street.

  • I-90 Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 8.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    Scenic and interesting are uncommon terms used to describe a trail alongside a busy freeway, but the I-90 Trail in Washington is different. The trail begins in the west in Seattle and runs for 10 miles across Lake Washington and Mercer Island to the Mercer Slough Nature Park in Bellevue. Across that distance, trail users get to traverse both the box girder East Channel Bridge and the floating Homer M. Hadley Memorial Bridge, explore two parks on lids over the freeway and take in the views along the massive lake.

    Bikers and pedestrians also get to use a unique separated tunnel below residences and parks but above the deeper I-90 vehicular travel lanes in eastern Seattle. Despite the trail's name, the busy highway is generally only visible on the two bridges and where the road emerges from underneath the lids. Elsewhere, vehicles are hidden behind landscaped sound walls, beneath the lid parks or in the tunnel.

  • Interurban Trail (North)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 24 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Interurban Trail (North) runs for 25 miles between Everett, Washington, in the north and the Seattle neighborhoods of Bitter Lake and Greenwood in the south. The trail—which is not to be confused with the more southerly trail of the same name stretching between Tukwila, Pacific and Fife—follows the old right-of-way used by the Seattle-Everett Interurban, which connected the two cities in the early 20th century.

    The trail is a popular commuting route through an urban landscape north of Seattle. The busy trail links many businesses and neighborhoods, and even features a direct connection to the Everett Mall at SE Everett Mall Way. Most of the trail is off-road but there are a few designated bike routes on-road; signs will guide you. A long segment of the trail parallels Interstate 5. Despite the asphalt surface, the trail accommodates horseback riders on certain segments in Snohomish County.

  • Interurban Trail (South)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 18.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Interurban Trail (South) follows the historic route of the Puget Sound Electric Railway, which shuttled passengers between Tacoma and Everett until 1928. The trail is most commonly (and more simply) called the Interurban Trail, and is not to be confused with the trail of the same name running on a northern portion of the rail corridor between Seattle and Everett.

    The trail begins in the north at Fort Dent Way in Tukwila, where it branches off from the Green River Trail near Fort Dent Park. Heading south, the trail passes under Interstate 405 and follows a Puget Sound Energy electric utility corridor through industrial areas of Tukwila and Kent. Much of this portion of the trail is adjacent to Union Pacific Railway .

    The Interurban Trail again connects to the Green River Trail at S. 259th Street in Kent, where it crosses the Green River on a dedicated bridge. In Algona, the surrounding land use shifts from industrial to residential. The north-south portion of the trail ends shortly thereafter at a trailhead park in the suburb of Pacific.

    The trail resumes about 1 mile west of the Pacific trailhead at 114th Avenue E. in Edgewood, where the Jovita Crossroads Trailhead Park offers restrooms, drinking fountains, picnic shelters and an interpretive display. From there, the trail follows the old railroad corridor a short distance to Military Road S. There is another incomplete section between Military Road and S. 380th Street, before the off-road route resumes. This portion of the Interurban Trail winds through dense forest in Milton before ending at 70th Avenue E. just south of where it meets busy I-5 in Fife.

    Future plans call for the completion of the various missing segments of the trail. In addition, the City of Fife is currently working to extend the popular trail westward

  • Issaquah-Preston Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4.8 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    Formerly the Issaquah Creek Trail, the Issaquah-Preston Trail links the towns of Issaquah and Preston in King County, Washington. The new section between High Point and SE High Point Way is hard-packed gravel, which parallels I-90 for a stretch. The trail intersects the southern terminus of the E. Lake Sammamish Trail at I-90. The best place to start is at Pickering Farm in Issaquah, which has a paved city path leading to the actual start of the Issaquah-Preston Trail (there is no decent parking at the start of the Issaquah-Preston Trail under the I-90 bridge).

    From Pickering Farm, a city park, head east toward Preston, crossing Issaquah Creek in about 0.5 mile. Watch for spawning salmon in the autumn. At just under 1 mile the trail crosses a road and joins East Lake Sammamish Trail briefly before heading south to the actual trail head. The trail parallels I-90 and crosses E. Lake Sammamish Parkway SE; this is a busy interchange but there is a pedestrian crossing light.

    Just after 2 miles the Issaquah-Preston Trail begins to climb to a tunnel crossing under Highland Drive NE. Enjoy the bright orange wildflower sculptures on both ends of the tunnel. Paved trails branch off in both directions uphill to Highlands and downhill to Issaquah.

    Shortly behind the tunnel the pavement ends; most of the trail surface from here to High Point is gravel and some sections can be muddy at times from poor drainage. Though you can still hear traffic on I-90, you get nice views of the East Fork of Issaquah Creek.

    At 3.4 miles and 3.9 miles two hiking trails lead uphill to Grand Ridge (and eventually to Duthie Hill Park). At 4.4 miles is Exit 20, with parking for or a dozen or so vehicles. Although called High Point, the real geographic high point is at the Preston trailhead. Between Exit 20 and Preston this new section parallels I-90 for nearly 1.5 miles and crosses two new bridges.
  • John Wayne Pioneer Trail (Milwaukee Road Corridor)

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 253 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Crushed Stone, Sand

    John Wayne Pioneer Trail offers more than 250 miles of scenic trail across Washington, from the eastern outskirts of Seattle to the state’s border with Idaho. It’s named for the John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders Association, who were instrumental in the trail’s creation. Chic Hollenbeck, an avid horse rider and founder of the group, was a hardcore fan of the iconic cowboy actor.

    The rail-trail follows the corridor of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (also known as the Milwaukee Road), which operated in the region between 1908 and 1980. Railroad tunnels, trestle bridges, depots, and other relics of the past can be experienced as you travel the old railbed.

    The Columbia River serves as a natural dividing line with a different trail experience on each side. Unfortunately, there currently is no convenient pedestrian access over the river to get from one side of the trail to the other. Though the trail leads to a trestle over the river, it’s in a poor, unsafe condition. Detour north of the trestle to the community of Vantage to take the I-90 bridge to the river’s eastern shore, noting that you’ll need to make the crossing by car.

    On the east side of the Columbia River, you’ll find 143 miles of rougher trail best-suited for experienced adventurers. This half of the trail passes through four counties, from west to east: Grant, Adams, Whitman, and Spokane. From the river east to the small town of Lind, the trail is known as the Milwaukee Road Corridor and is managed by the state’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR).  From Lind east to Idaho, the trail is managed by Washington State Parks.

    The trail on the west side of the river is also managed by Washington State Parks and traverses the linear Iron Horse State Park. This half of the trail is a well-developed 110-mile gravel pathway. In 2009, the state closed five tunnels on this stretch due to seeping water and

  • Marymoor Connector Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Although short, the Marymoor Connector Trail provides an important link between the Sammamish River Trail (an 11-mile route that heads north to Bothell and the Burke-Gilman Trail) and the East Lake Sammamish Trail (which heads 11 miles south to Issaquah). All are part of a vast and growing regional network of trails stretching from Puget Sound to the Cascade Mountains.

    The trail's route across Redmond's Marymoor Park is pleasant and paved, but does not offer much shade.

  • Middle Fork Snoqualmie River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 17 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel

    The Middle Fork Snoqualmie River Trail is open to hikers and horseback riders. The trail can be difficult to navigate in places, since other trails link with it (some unmaintained). There are a few stream and forest road crossings. For more details and directions, visit the Web links to the right.

    The trail is on the Snoqualmie Ranger District of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

  • Necklace Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 7.5 miles
    Surface: Dirt

    From Mt. Baker-Snoqualamie National Forest:
    The first 1.5 miles of the trail follows an old railroad grade, then enters Alpine Lakes Wilderness. Once crossing the river at milepost 5.0, the trail becomes very steep and rough, climbing 2,550 feet in 2.2 miles. There are campsites available on the river at milepost 5.0, and in Necklace Valley at Jade, Emerald, Ilswoot, Opal, and Cloudy, Al, Locket, and Jewel Lakes. Necklace Valley is a fragile sub-alpine valley with extensive meadows.
  • North Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 7.25 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt

    The North Creek Trail links the cities of Bothell, Mill Creek and Everett, as well as the communities in between. The trail also provides access to the Sammamish River Trail. The trail follows a wooded corridor with some gentle hills interspersed with wetlands-great for bird-watching. As of autumn 2011 the trail is broken into two disjointed segments.

    The northern segment in Mill Creek runs for 2.5 miles between McCollum Pioneer Park off Route 96 and 164th St. SE. The Bothell segment runs for nearly 5 miles from north of Bothell at 214th St. SE south to the Sammamish River Trail just south of Route 522.

    Another segment is in the works that will join the short distance between 208th Street SE and Bothell Everett Highway/SR 527 at 214th Street. In the meantime, to join the two segments cyclists must use on-street bike lanes on Bothell Everett Highway/SR-527. Note, these lanes in both directions are poorly marked (as of April 2011) and the segment of the highway between 214th St SE and 164th St SE has heavy traffic.

  • PROJECT: North Creek Trail (Connection Project)

    State: WA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface:

    Snohomish County is moving on efforts to close the gap between the two completed portions of the North Creek Trail. In late 2009, Snohomish County began Phase I of its plan to build a section of North Creek Trail between Filbert Road and North Creek Park (183rd Street SE) west of the Bothell-Everett Highway. The trail will be part of a coordinated regional system that will eventually connect the Sammamish River/Burke-Gillman Trail in King County with the Snohomish County Regional Interurban Trail in Everett.

    Phase I of the project consists of identifying a preferred alternative and purchasing the necessary right-of-way, which is expected to be completed before the end of 2014. Funds for Phase I, including the purchase of land for the trail, were provided by King County in accordance with the mitigation agreement for the Brightwater treatment facility located in south Snohomish County. The county is currently seeking funding for construction of the trail. On November 16, 2011, Snohomish County will hold an open house meeting to show alternatives for the north section of the trail and the recommended West Alignment for the section of the trail south of 192nd Street SE.

    In response to additional citizen comments, the County has identified two additional alternatives for the section of trail between 192nd Street SE and 183rd Street SE. The three alternatives, along with their pros and cons, will be on display at the November 2011 meeting. Comments from citizens will be used to select the final alignment north of 192nd Street SE.

    The West Alignment south of 192nd Street SE will provide the opportunity for a trail that meets WSDOT's standard of 12 feet in width for a multi-use pedestrian trail and will provide a unique opportunity to experience a natural environment in the middle of an urban area. As Snohomish County continues to develop in the future, opportunities to create these types of regional trails will be more difficult. It is the objectiv
  • Prairie Line Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 0.3 miles
    Surface: Concrete, Crushed Stone

    The Prairie Line Trail will run through downtown Tacoma along the former Northern Pacific Railroad that was established here in 1873. Tacoma was the terminus of the rail line that stretched all the way to the Great Lakes.

    The first of three phases opened in September 2014 and travels down the center of the University of Washington’s Tacoma campus. The trail is a beauty with a section of elegant gray-and-white brick. Ornamental trees, rain gardens, and other landscaping add to the trail's visual appeal.

    Eventually, the rail-trail will extend to the Brewery District, Museum District, the Thea Foss Waterway, and the Water Ditch Trail.

  • Preston-Snoqualmie Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 6.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    This trail rewards users with an interesting view of Snoqualmie Falls after experiencing several miles of western Washington forests. A short series of switchbacks near the mid-point can be a challenge to some users.
  • Puyallup Riverwalk Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Puyallup Riverwalk Trail traces the tree-lined shoreline in northern Puyallup, a few miles southeast of Tacoma. The paved pathway consists of two completed segments with about a mile of residential roadway and sidewalks in between. As you travel alongside River Road, you'll catch glimpses of the water on one side and commercial areas on the other. A mall at the Meridian Avenue crossing offers places to stop and eat.

    The trail ends on the outskirts of Sumner. From here, the adventurous can continue their journey on the Foothills Trail. From the Riverwalk's eastern-most endpoint, cross under Main Avenue and go south on 134th Avenue through rural landscapes for about 1 mile to make the connection just off 80th Street. The scenic rail-trail stretches about 15 miles through the towns of Alderton, Orting and South Prairie.
  • Rainier Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Rainier Trail brings trail users from the 11-mile East Lake Sammamish Trail south through downtown Issaquah. The paved trail provides access to a number of recreational, cultural and civic amenities, including a local community center, senior center, baseball diamond, skate park and City Hall. Because it directly leads to Issaquah Middle School and Issaquah High School, the trail is also a safe route to school for many of the city’s young residents.

    One of the more interesting portions of the trail’s route is its alignment adjacent to the Issaquah Valley Trolley near the restored Issaquah Depot. The old train station is now a museum featuring exhibits on the local railroad history. The operating trolley was introduced as a popular addition to the museum in 2001 and continues to run on Saturdays and Sundays from April through September. The fare is by donation, which also grants access to the Issaquah Depot Museum.

  • Redmond Central Connector

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Redmond Central Connector will one day stretch 4 miles along a former rail line, the Redmond Spur of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad.

    Currently, one mile is complete in downtown Redmond from the Bear Creek Trail to the Sammamish River Trail. For its full length, the trail parallels the East Link light rail. Along the paved pathway, you’ll find public art and the Redmond Town Center, which offers shops, restaurants, and entertainment. The trail ends at the Bear Creek Park, a lush oasis in the heart of the city.

    The second phase of the trail—another mile connecting to the Willows business district—is expected to be completed in 2015.

  • Ruston Way Path

    State: WA
    Length: 2.53 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The delightful Ruston Way Path sits in the Old Town neighborhood of northern Tacoma. Its linear, flat and paved nature make it a cinch for all travelers and it offers lovely views of Commencement Bay, sandy beaches and majestic Mount Rainier.

    The trail begins in Jack Hyde Park and continues northwest along its namesake roadway through a series of small waterfront parks, where you'll find great places to stop and enjoy the scenery or take part in more active pursuits, such as scuba diving, kayaking or fishing. If you need refreshments, several restaurants also line the path.

    Not far from the Les Davis Pier (3427 Ruston Way), you'll come across the landlocked Fireboat No. 1. The boat, bright red and 96 feet in length, was built in 1929 and is designated a National Historic Landmark.

    The pathway ends at the former American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) site, originally built in the late 1800s and closed in the 1980s. Since then, this EPA-designated Superfund site has been undergoing remediation with plans to make it a mixed-use community area.
  • Sammamish River Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 11 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Sammamish River Trail skirts the river that connects Lake Sammamish to Lake Washington. Along the way, enjoy views of the water, the Cascade foothills, and lush wooded areas. It's entirely paved, but a parallel soft-surface trail between Redmond’s Marymoor Park and Northeast 175th Street in Woodinville is available for equestrians.

    In Marymoor Park, a short connecting trail links it to the 11-mile East Lake Sammamish Trail, and a little farther north it meets the Bear Creek Trail that heads east and offers access to the restaurants and shopping of Redmond Town Center.

    The trail continues north through Redmond, then passes wineries, Redhook Brewery, and Wilmot Gateway Park in Woodinville. It ends in Bothell, where it meets the Burke-Gilman Trail, a Hall-of-Fame Trail that extends down to Seattle.

  • Scott Pierson Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Concrete

    The Scott Pierson Trail runs parallel to State Route 16 for most of its journey from 25th Street in Tacoma to 24th Street on the southern edge of Gig Harbor. The 5-mile trail is a safe and convenient option for bicyclists and pedestrians to cross Puget Sound, although it is often loud due to its close proximity to a busy highway.

    The trail is named in honor of the longtime landscape architect and urban planner in Tacoma who advocated tirelessly for its creation. The highlight of the route is undoubtedly the impressive Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which offers sweeping views of Puget Sound as it carries separated vehicular and bike/ped traffic from Tacoma to the Kitsap Peninsula, and vice versa.

    In Tacoma, the trail links walkers, runners and cyclists to a variety of amenities, including War Memorial Park, the Tacoma Nature Center at Snake Lake and Cheney Stadium (home of Minor League Baseball's Tacoma Rainiers). Unfortunately, the trail is not always well-marked in Tacoma. Refer to the TrailLink map for the exact route.
  • Seattle Waterfront Pathway

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The highly urban Seattle Waterfront Pathway is a continuation of the Elliot Bay Trail and carries on south from Broad Street south to South Royal Brougham Way. The trail parallels Alaskan Way along Elliot Bay, past ferry terminals, cruise ship docks, restaurants, the aquarium, and a park. It's a great place for watching cruise ships in this vibrant city.

  • Ship Canal Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.9 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Across the waterway from its big brother (the Burke-Gilman Trail), the Ship Canal Trail runs along the southern edge of the Lake Washington Ship Canal near Seattle Pacific University. The trail links the Burke-Gilman Trail via the Fremont Avenue Bridge with the bike path on W. Emerson Place near Fishermen's Terminal.

    The completion of the trail to its current western terminus makes it possible for intrepid bikers and runners to travel from Redmond to downtown Seattle almost entirely on non-motorized paths. The Ship Canal Trail is popular with dog-walkers and joggers.

  • Snohomish County Centennial Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 31.5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Snohomish County Centennial Trail currently runs for 31.5 miles from Snohomish to the Skagit County line, linking neighborhoods with businesses and shopping districts. The trail provides a pleasant route for commuters and recreationists alike. The popular trail is open to cyclists, pedestrians, joggers and equestrians (adjacent natural surface trail) and is accessible for all levels of physical ability.

    At the Machias trailhead you'll find a replica of the old railroad depot that was built here in the late 1890s to serve the Seattle, Lake Shore, and Eastern Railroad. The railroad branch between Snohomish and Arlington was bought by Northern Pacific then Burlington Northern, which stopped operating by 1987. The railroad once transported timber, ore, mail and people.

  • Snoqualmie Valley Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 31.5 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Gravel

    The Snoqualmie Valley Trail traverses one of northwest Washington's most beautiful agricultural landscapes, passing through several communities and taking in parks, natural areas and farmland. In addition, the trail incorporates railroad trestles along the route. At its southern end at Rattlesnake Lake, the Snoqualmie Valley Trail connects to the Iron Horse State Park Trail.

    There is a gap in the trail near the town of Snoqualmie, between SE Reinig Road and Tokul Road; both require that you use stairs to access the trail from the road. On Tokul Road, you'll find the trail on the north side of the road near the guard rail just west of SE 60th Street. Use Mill Pond Road between Reinig and Tokul to bridge the 2.4-mile gap.

  • Soos Creek Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 6 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Soos Creek Trail travels through heavily wooded forest on a north-south route spanning the eastern edge of the Seattle suburb of Kent. Following the path of its namesake creek, the trail begins just a short distance from scenic Lake Meridian in the south and travels northward towards its ultimate terminus at Meeker Middle School.

    The trail is paved over its entire length, and an adjacent soft surface path for equestrian use parallels the trail at times. Near the trail's midpoint at SE 216th Street, bikers, walkers and runners can continue west to the 9-mile Lake Youngs Trail, which encircles the large lake with an unpaved path.

    Plans are in motion to extend the Soos Creek Trail north for an additional 4 miles to ultimately connect to the existing Cedar Creek Trail in Renton.

  • Soundview Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The scenic Soundview Trail runs along and through the Chambers Bay public golf course—future site of the U.S. Open in 2015—within Pierce County's Chambers Creek Regional Park. The 2-mile trail links at both ends with the slightly shorter Grandview Trail, allowing for longer treks on a loop through the park.

    While both trails are paved, the Soundview Trail is slightly more challenging due to steeper grades and several switchbacks needed to compensate. The ultimate payoff is worth it, with dramatic views of Puget Sound available along most of the trail's route. In the north, the trail also passes through a dense grove of trees, and in the south, the trail connects to several unpaved park trails.

  • Sumner Link Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5.1 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    Sumner Link Trail provides an important connection between the Interurban Trail and the Puyallup Riverwalk Trail. Along the way, the trail follows the White River, offering views of the water, meadows, and farm fields. Note that a portion of the route—along Fryar Avenue—is on-road.

  • Sylvia Creek Forestry Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 2.3 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Dirt, Gravel

    The Sylvia Creek Forestry Trail is located in Lake Sylvia State Park north of Montesano on Washington's Olympic Peninsula. The interpretive trail winds through the deep forest and alongside scenic creeks and ponds. The trail follows an old logging railroad line along the west shore of the lake, leaving from the boat launch. You can combine it with other trails to loop around the lake. It's a great place for watching wildlife, especially birds, and peaceful retreat. Download the interpretive brochure (link to the right) for a description of what to see along the way.

  • Tolt Pipeline Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 17.4 miles
    Surface: Dirt, Gravel, Sand

    The Tolt Pipeline Trail serves as a major connection between Duvall, Washington, and the Sammamish River in Bothell. The trail follows a water pipeline right-of-way and is not recommended for all trail users. The majority of traffic consists of mountain bikers and horseback riders. Due to the many steep grades along the trail, as well as the gravel and dirt surface, bicyclists must be aware of the limitations of their equipment.

    Conveniently, the Tolt Pipeline Trail's western terminus in Blyth Park ends very close to both the Sammamish River Trail and the Burke-Gilman Trail. It moves eastward on an ungraded surface, making the many hill climbs an intense workout. Additionally, the wide cut of the pipeline's right of way (up to 100 feet) provides little escape from the sun.

    At West Snoqualmie Valley Road NE, riders can continue via street access to Duvall's portion of the Tolt Pipeline Trail at nearby Duvall Park. Just to the west of the park, the trail directly connects to the Snoqualmie Valley Trail.

  • West Campus Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 1.04 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The West Campus Trail provides access from the BPA Trail to Federal Way's West Campus medical centers. The short trail also offers the many surrounding neighborhoods a safe off-street connection to the highlights along the BPA Trail, including Celebration Park (soccer fields, baseball diamonds, general recreation) and the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center.

  • West Tiger Railroad Grade

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 4 miles
    Surface: Ballast, Dirt

  • Willapa Hills Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 56 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Grass, Gravel

    The Willapa Hills Trail runs 56 miles between Chehalis and South Bend in Washington state. Formerly a Northern Pacific Railway, this corridor was rail banked and is in the process of being converted into a rail-trail. Though both ends are paved, there are several trestles that are unimproved or have been washed away in the 2007 floods and a large portion of the trail is still ballast and may be covered with brush. Both trestles are scheduled to be replaced by FEMA in the next 2 years.

    The Chehalis section is paved for 5.2 miles from the new trailhead on SW Hillberger Road out to a new trailhead (parking, with restrooms coming soon) behind the high school in Adna and across Bunker Creek Road. This section offers a charming pastoral ride through dairy country, with two nice bridges that survived the 2007 floods.

    A half mile past Bunker Creek Road is Trestle #5, which is unplanked and not considered usable at this time, though there is a plan to deck it with local donated materials and labor in the near future.

    On the other side of Trestle #5, a 1.3 mile segment is accessible from Clinton Road and the surface has recently been compacted and graveled but the Ceres Trestle at mile 6.5 is washed out.

    A 9.5 mile segment of gravel and compacted trail extends from the washed out Ceres Trestle at mile 6.5 to the Dryad Trestle at mile 16 and is excellent for cycling or walking. It passes near Rainbow Falls State Park at the center of the segment. This segment can be accessed from Ceres Hill Road or Chandler Road near Dryad.

    From the Dryad Trestle to Raymond the trail is largely unimproved with the surface primarily ballast and overgrown with brush in areas. An additional segment from Dryad to Pe Ell is scheduled for compacting and gravel in the summer of 2011.

    The 5-mile section from Raymond to South Bend is paved and follows the Willapa River.

    The Willapa Hills Trail has modest grades and gorgeous views of the river and val
  • Woodland Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 5 miles
    Surface: Asphalt, Gravel

    The Woodland Trail connects the cities of Olympia and Lacey with a linear trail and park along the abandoned Burlington Northern corridor. The 5 mile long trail connects in the center with the Chehalis Western Trail to form a wonderful network in Thurston County. Olympia had to negotiate access from many adjacent landowners after the railroad abandoned the line, but held to the vision of a trail created by active citizens and organizations. The Master Plan for the trail was completed in 1999 and became the number one parks priority in the comprehensive plan. The trail in Olympia is well shaded and green, while the Lacey side parallels a busy street and passes through a couple traffic circles. Volunteers have been busily planting trees along the corridor that will bring great benefits as they mature.
  • Yelm-Tenino Trail

    Rail-Trail

    State: WA
    Length: 14 miles
    Surface: Asphalt

    The Yelm-Tenino Trail runs for nearly 14 miles between the trail's namesake towns, following the old corridor of the Burlington Northern Railroad. The trail also links the community of Rainier, which is near the midpoint. Begin near Yelm City Hall and end in Tenino City Park.

    The trail parallels State Route 507 while passing through a mixed landscape of farmland, forested areas and suburban back yards. You'll also pass by a lake and cross the Deschute River. The Yelm-Tenino Trail intersects with the 22-mile Chehalis Western Trail just east of the river.