Polly Ann Trail

Michigan

Polly Ann Trail Facts

States: Michigan
Counties: Lapeer, Oakland
Length: 34.2 miles
Trail end points: Joslyn Rd. south of Waldon Rd. (Orion Township) and N. Lake Pleasant Rd. north of Kings Mill Rd. (North Branch Township)
Trail surfaces: Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone
Trail category: Rail-Trail
ID: 6016203
Trail activities: Bike, Horseback Riding, Mountain Biking, Walking, Cross Country Skiing

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Polly Ann Trail Description

The Polly Ann Trail is a 34-mile long, non-motorized trail extending north from suburban Detroit on a former Pontiac, Oxford & Northern Railroad corridor. The trail is managed separately by groups in Lapeer County and Oakland County, and the experience along the trail is vastly different in the two counties.

The portion of the trail in Oakland County has a crushed stone surface and runs for 14.2 miles from Orion Township to the Oakland–Lapeer county line. Certain sections of the trail in urban areas have an improved asphalt surface. Along the way, trail users pass through the communities of Orion Township, Oxford Township, the Village of Oxford, Addison Township and the Village of Leonard.

In Lapeer County, the Polly Ann Trail continues north with a much rougher ballast surface for 20 miles to North Branch Township. The trail is clear and maintained in Dryden Township, Dryden Village and Imlay City, with the latter community featuring a paved stretch. The rest of the trail is largely unimproved and may be rough, uneven and wet in spots. For this reason, mountain bikers, hikers and horseback riders will generally have the best experience along the Polly Ann Trail in Lapeer County.

Parking and Trail Access

Public parking is available for the Polly Ann Trail in Oakland County at the Orion Township municipal offices (2525 Joslyn Road), in downtown Oxford and at the trailhead in Leonard. Parking for the trail in Lapeer County is available where the trail crosses W. 4th Street and at Lions Park in Imlay City, as well as on Main Street in Dryden.

Polly Ann Trail Reviews

My husband and I love riding trails with our hybrid bikes. We discovered a section of the Polly Ann Trail in Imlay City. When we came to the road near the high school, the rest of the trail was overgrown with weeds, grass, and trees. We decided the check out the other end of the paved section to discover the rest is very hard to find. If it continues on the road, it is full of chuck pits. How in the world can they boast the length of this trail and claim it is paved, asphalt, and stone?!?! It is past time to properly surface and mark the rest of it.

The Polly Ann Trail in Lapeer County is approximately 23 miles long, beginning at the Oakland County/Lapeer County line and continuing north to Curtis Road.

The trail is mostly grass and generally is a delightful walk through the woods. For most of the trail, the trail is wide enough for two horses (or two bikes) to ride side by side. The trail is mowed often from spring through fall although it can have some wet/muddy spots, especially in the spring. The trail is owned by the DNR and is maintained by Lapeer County with DNR funding. In full disclosure, I am a board member of the Friends of the Polly Ann Trail, a charitable organization that does fundraising for the trail, helps with maintenance, promotes the trail, and hosts two major trail events each year.

There was a time, from 2009 until approximately 2013 when several of the bridge approaches were out due to a huge flood in 2009. Those approaches have been replaced and the entire trail is accessible.

The Friends of the Polly Ann Trail hosts a 10K walk/run, starting at the Imlay City High School and continuing to Dryden, in June of each year. In 2016 there were 50 runners/walkers who participated and were very positive about the event.

The Friends of the Polly Ann Trail also hosts "Autumn on the Polly Ann Trail" on the second Saturday of October each year. It is a horseback ride, starting at General Squier Park in Dryden. Riders can choose the length of their ride and travel either north or south on the trail. In 2015, we had 75 horses and riders and had a wonderful time.

The trail passes through Dryden, where there is a very nice gabezo, with benches, a water fountain and a map of the trial. There are several nice restaurants just west of the trail to stop for a bite to eat.

In Imlay City, there is a trailhead near the intersection of 4th Street and Black's Corner's road. The trailhead has benches, a map of the trail, ample parking and two hitching posts for horses. The trail is paved in Imlay City for approximately 1800 feet.

I recommend this trail for hikers and bikers. I rode it from Orion Township at the southern end to Leonard, all in Oakland County. I have not used the Lapeer County section. The trail is mostly gravel, occasionally a little looser than desirable, with a few paved sections. It has few hills and is easy to ride. There is an area around Lake Orion where the trail detours from the old rail bed onto Joslyn Road. There is little directional signage there and it is easy to get off the proper path; be sure to take a map. There are several restrooms along the trail and many places to eat, especially in Oxford.

Accordion

I hiked the trail north of Imlay City and found it a pleasant departure from the super-highway trails of Oakland County. I didn't encounter another person, but saw birds and wildlife. If you are looking for paved super-groomed trails, it's not the one for you.

Have ridden this trail a few times, and like the rustic nature. Excellent surface for a hybrid or Mtn bike, and cruising is fast and pretty smooth. on a spring day, had to be careful not to hit all the water and garter snakes sunning on the trail from Drahner Rd south. Not a tough trail for beginners. Highly recommend this trail for those liking good scenery, safe crossings, etc..

Rode the trail from downtown oxford to 2 miles past the Lapeer-county line.

As said many times before, the Oakland part of the trail is very well maintained. Even after much rain etc the trail is smooth and packed, road crossings well maintained.

Only went a few miles into Lapeer. As stated in other reviews, it is single track, but maintained perfectly well for an easy mountain bike ride.

Scenery was good - mostly away from roads, not too back-yard intrusive. The Lapeer section looked less inhabited, which was promising.

I look forward to going further next time. It was a fantastic ride.....

My wife and I rode from Oxford to Dryden. The section from Oxford to the Oakland County/ Lapeer County line was great. Mostly hard packed with occasional asphalt. Once we entered Lapeer county it was all single track. Luckily we had our mountain bikes, and it gave us a great workout. The last few miles before Dryden wasn't even single track, just grass. The breakfast at the Coney Island in Dryden was great. We split the a monster omelet and still had too much food. Would definately recommend it for breakfast. A great morning ride for a couple of seniors. Total trip was about 30 miles.

This is a quiet and peaceful stretch of the Polly Ann Trail. Lots of wildlife and fairly clear trail with only one downed tree to traverse. Most of the trail is crushed limestone, single track, and good riding. There were a few low spots with a bit of mud, but nothing major. Overall, a great trail for a bit of off-road riding.

We rode the trail with friends, started out near Indianwood Road. Gravel to start with then some paved areas in Oxford. We continued on over the bridge crossing 24 to the quarry. On the way back we stopped for a great lunch in Oxford at Red Knapps American Grill. I would recommend this trail, can't wait to go ride it again. Nice crossing signals when going across some roads but be sure the cars are paying attention, there was a red truck that didn't want to see to stop for us!

I agree with manistee.
I jogged the trail north of Imlay City, because of the too soft and muddy surface for biking.
I had no difficulty in dealing with grasses in March. The grasses were trimmed.

Still no change in the condition of this trail from Imlay City North to Lum. Still nothing but an overgrown foot path. No effort put into this trail at all. sad...

Ride the trail regularly in Oakland County. It varies in surface from crushed gravel to paved from Lake Orion north. It is paved for a good portion through Oxford, then returns to crushed gravel. Once you get to the Lapeer County border however, it turns into a very narrow bike path that is only usable if you have a mountain bike, in my opinion.

You can stop in Oxford for food and drinks very easily.

We rode this trail after reading the reviews. It was a mostly wide trail. Varying surfaces. One area trail detours for a block due to private ownership maybe? Other than that, we will return to ride more of the northern portion. We rode to Orion and ate. Next time we will start there.

I love this trail, the varied surfaces, packed gravel,dirt and asphalt make it a fun ride! If you go early in the morning you can see a variety of wildlife, I am able to do the 34 mile ride in 3 hour's even. I do this ride once a week weather permitting. Hopefully they will extend the trail further north.

Condition report as of May 23, 2014.
North of Dryden washouts at two stream crossings have finally been repaired (filled with dirt rather than bridges)
Due to considerable snow melt from a record winter along with a wet spring the area directly north of Dryden is barely passable with considerable amounts of water in the trail. (Much easier to walk than to ride at some points, though my shoes were completely soaked through.)
North of the Lapeer county border there are also many other wet areas. Though passable for a true mountain biking experience.
Dangerous hole in the trail graciously had a large stick inserted inside to divert traffic around it.

To EDIT my previous description of the trail, I describe the NORTH Lapeer county portion of the trail from Imlay City Northward to Lum and towards the end of the trail BEFORE it reaches Kings Mill.There is a pile of dirt blocking the end of the trail before it reaches Mill st in Kings mill. North of Curtis road.

the entirety of the trail is negotiable, and mildly technical if you count the occasional washboard, dead-fall, and loose gravel/stone as such. for the last month or so what grass there is has been mowed and the brush is cut back along the trail - for the most part. fat tires and a little shock absorption is the way to go. this can be a fun ride, but the uneven/unpredictable terrain will definitely feel like a chore for some folks. NOTE: the bridge located between hunters creek and sutton is significantly damaged, but can be crossed - on foot. some folks could ride the decidedly makeshift and certainly unofficial bridge repair across, but I dared not.

Entered trail from Lum in Lapeer County. I headed south towards Imlay city on foot.Tall weeds ,maybe was mowed once this summer. Very overgrown with brush & trees. Decided to walk it first before trying my bike.
The crossing at one road has been turned into a guys yard which was close to his house so I decided not to go across just in case he had big dogs. Decided to go back in discust & disappointment This trail was bought 20 years ago & still is not a trail! No one cares at all. Its sad there is NO bike lanes or trails at all in Lapeer County that go anywhere other than around in circles.
Imlay city section of the trail is pretty much complete but that is it. Cant go into or out of town . Leadership & money is needed in a bad way in my opinion.
Michigan in general is WAY behind on constructing bicycle lanes on the roads & streets & having bicycle trails. It is completely unsafe to ride these roads on a bicycle. Could save a lot of gas & have a good safe mode of transportation and recreation for families and everyone.
Each township should spend some money to help do their part. What a joke!

Weeds are 3 ft tall, missing bridges, really technical single-track... It's a beautiful place overall, but impossible to walk or ride there.

Started at M-24 in Oxford and traveled W/S for 7 miles. First part is asphalt followed by hard packed ballast. There was a soft location where bikers have moved to the dirt edge and several chipmunk holes that can be a bit jarring if hit (I got one). There is one deviation from the original RR track but was easy to navigate. Sunday morning was very lightly traveled with many sections all by myself. I look forward to head East next time and hopefully travel further on my mountain bike.

I rode my mountain bike on that stretch of the polly ann trail today. I have to say I am disappointed with the condition of the trail, and the bridge that was out along the trail. I enjoy riding in the country and the polly ann trail would be even better to do so, if they would take care of it like they do all the rest of the beautiful trail systems in Michigan.

The trail is beautiful and peaceful....perfect for a morning ride. Clean, nice walking surface for the horses feet, nice trees, safe, shady, and pleasant....except for the crazy person who we came upon. A lady walking her little terrier started yelling and ranting at us (myself and my 2 nieces on horseback). This was our first time riding on the trail and we were having a great time. She decided to express her anger on how horses poop on the trail daily and she is tired of picking it up. She demanded to see our shovels....what? Obviously, she needs medication for her anger issues. She told us to come back once per week to clean up horse poop....of course, we only laughed. We were on the trail for about 45 mins total and none of our horses pooped during that time frame. There was some old dried up poop on the trail for which she blamed us...she said she was going to call Addison Township to have horses banned from the trail....how silly. We still had a great time and she gave us something to laugh about...:) Enjoy! but if you are on your horse, beware of angry people with small dogs.

There were several washouts of the trail between Hunter's Creek Rd and Hollow Corners Road. One is at an old bridge where the approaches to the bridge are washed out making the trail impassable. In addition there is a culvert that is washed out.

To detour the washed out bridge, heading south from Lapeer, go east on Hunters Creek Rd, then south on S. Summers Rd, then west on Sutton Road.

Trail status update:
Conditions seem to have deteriorated since the last few reviews.

We are contemplating a run from Lk Orion to Imlay City and are wondering what kind of shape the trail is north of Dryden...If anyone has ridden since tcphillips did in July, I'd love to hear about it! Thanks!

The trail in Lapeer County north of Bordman Rd. (and south of Imlay City) has been mowed.

It has not been graded or improved, but the weeds and underbrush have been held at bay.

The trail is still non-technical single track along which the rider can pass single file, and the hard-packed surface is quite nice for those in the mood for a country ride.

This is still not a ride for the exceedingly casual biker, but nonetheless a nice ride for multi-gear, fat-tired bikes.

Don't forget the DEET-based insect repellent and plenty of water.
It's tick and deer-fly season.

--TCP

I fully agree with what Tcphillips says about this ride since I have done it a couple of times to at least Imlay City.

I would like to add, after you cross Imlay City Road or M-21 headed towards Kings Mill, when the trail crosses a road, there is fence gate chained closed blocking the trail at each road crossing.

You will need to either lift the bike over the gate or push it through the weeds around it.

I tried this for a few road crossings before I stopped the trip north in the summer of 2009.

The country Parks and Recreation Department said this was done to help keep motor cycles and snowmobiles off the trail and still allow emergency vehicles to get at the trails.

dancpa

June 5, 2010

Updated trail conditions....

I had occasion to ride north from Leonard, Michigan/Bordman Rd to Imlay City, MI this past weekend.

The trail does not appear to have been mowed this season as of this date.
There is a gravel single track along the right-of-way that is easy riding, but it is narrow (single file) and the grass is high to both sides.

There is nothing particularly wrong with this, but those looking for a leisurely ride along a groomed trail won't find it here.

If one is going to ride the Polly Ann in Lapeer County, MI, I recommend a DEET-based insect repellent to keep both flying insects and ticks at bay.

Updates as the season progresses....

--TCP



Total mileage is 18.3

Not 14.3

Don't know how I missed that.

Regards....Tom Phillips

August 3, 2009

The Polly Ann follows the old Pontiac, Oxford & Northern rail line. The “official” trail is marked from Oxford north to Leonard and to Bordman Rd. but the right-of-way is marked and quite passable (for hikers, horse, and mountain bikes) quite a bit further. That is the topic of this article.

The trail entry for the purely Lapeer County portion is on Bordman Rd., 1.6 miles north of Leonard, Michigan and 0.8 miles east of Rochester Rd. Leonard is roughly 15 miles north of the center of Rochester, Michigan on Rochester Rd (also known as Forest St, in Leonard.) There is no defined parking lot on Bordman Rd. other than on the side of the road.

The trail becomes mowed two-track whose surface ranges from stone dust to dirt to road bed ballast. The right-of-way is not particularly brushy, but it is a “trail ride” from here on. It is quite passable on a mountain bike. My wife and I ride a tandem but from this point north a tandem team would be greatly challenged, due to trail surface conditions.

At Hough Rd. the trail is less improved, rail bed ballast and gravel. Another mile north the trail climbs a steep embankment up to General Squier Rd. This road is paved and traffic travels at 55 mph, so be careful. The embankment on the other side is just as steep. Walking one’s bike up and down may be a good idea. At General Squier Rd., visible to the west of the trail crossing, there is a commercial farm/vineyard that has produce and fruit for sale in season. It is a worthwhile side trip.

Continuing NNE along the trail, the trail surface gets rougher, down to single track with uneven surfaces, which can be wet and occasionally slippery after a local rain. The trail crosses Casey Rd. about 1/4 mile east of General Squier Park and about ½ mile east of Pioneer Cemetery which has the graves some of the earliest settlers in the area. The trail passes through numerous marshy areas. There are well-maintained bridges across marshy areas and streams all along the trail.

The trail crosses Dryden Rd. just east of the main intersection in Dryden, Michigan. There are stores and a restaurant or two and also a gas station. There is a pavilion on the south side of Dryden Rd. just west of the trail crossing. Dryden Rd. is within the village limits, nonetheless traffic is quick there and caution while crossing is advised.

From Dryden the trail is mowed but single track. The trail will cross Hollow Corners Rd. then Sutton Rd. Shortly thereafter is Hunters Creek Rd., Summers Rd. and then Interstate-69. Summers Rd. is a north-south road unlike the others (This note to help orientation.) As the rider crosses under I-69, the large concrete abutments to guard the highway bridge pylons against train derailment may be noticed. The next road is Newark Rd. The country is mainly agricultural with large soy bean and corn farms. There are also stretches of woods.

At Black’s Corner Rd. (another north-south road) the trail becomes paved for something less than a mile. On the west side of the trail is a pickle factory. The trail crosses under the old Grand Trunk Western (now Canadian National) line which travels east to Port Huron and into Canada.

This portion of the trail passes west of the old main business district of Imlay City. At W. 4th Street, one may head east to N. Main St. for a ride around old Imlay City, the center of which is at N. Main and 3rd St. There are numerous restaurants, shops, and gas stations in the old section of town. It is a very typical Midwestern small agricultural/industrial-based town. There has been a substantial remodeling of the old business district that has been nicely done. There is a downtown pavilion and sitting area. There are ice cream shops (a nod to my wife.) There are numerous historic homes on side streets. The main business district of Imlay City has shifted to Van Dyke Ave. (M-53) which is further east. Van Dyke (M-53) is extremely busy with a great deal of traffic as M-53 is the major north-south route between Detroit, I-69, and up into Michigan’s “thumb.”

The trail heads NNW out of Imlay City toward Lum, Michigan. Crossing back over Black’s Corner Rd. at Attica Rd. the trail returns to rough single track. At this point trail maintenance becomes spotty. Mowing seems to be perhaps once a year. The trail surface is rail bed ballast, dirt, and pebble. It may be wet after local rain and can be slippery. There also seemed to be the occasional railroad tie hidden barely beneath the trail surface that can dump the unwary (speaking from experience here.)

The trail crosses Summers Rd. (north-south road) and then quickly crosses Imlay City Rd./Capac Rd./old M-21/78. Caution must be taken here. This is the old main highway between Port Huron and Flint. It is still a major surface thoroughfare. Traffic is very heavy and very fast here.

The trail crosses Bower Rd. and continues NNW through farm country. The next road crossing is Youngs Rd. (north-south road.).

The trail enters Lum, Michigan at Lum Rd., ½ block east of Mitchell Lake Rd. There is a party store in Lum that has ice cream (a nod to my wife), drinks, and makes pizza. The proprietors took pity on my wife and let her use the bathroom. Otherwise there are no public toilets (that we could find) in Lum.

The trail continues NNW swinging to North out of Lum headed toward Kings Mill. The agricultural country continues with soy bean fields, corn fields, an occasional sugar beet field, with occasional deep woods sections. The next road crossing is Stanton Lake Rd. There is one more crossing at Curtis Rd. before one arrives at Kings Mill. Kings Mill is on Lake Pleasant Rd., which is an extension of Rochester Rd. There is no formal trail entry here but there is a small community here and party store at the corner of Kings Mill Rd. Mill St., and Lake Pleasant Rd. where one may ask to park. There do not appear to be any public toilets (that we could find.)

Additional notes:
There are numerous creek crossings all along the way on bridges built and maintained by various clubs and civic organizations. The bridges are sound and well maintained. One may choose to walk one’s bike across as at some of the approaches to the bridges there may be a difference in surface height from the approach, to the bridge deck, and back to the following approach.

Long sections of the trail run through some fairly deep woods and marshy areas. In warm weather insect repellent is advised. There are numerous deer in the area as well, so to guard against ticks as well as biting flies, an insect repellent with DEET may be advisable.

Michigan temperatures in July and August can reach into the 80’s and occasionally 90’s. Carry sufficient water.

At most of the road/trail crossings, there is sufficient parking for one or two cars to get on the shoulder to load and off-load bicycles. Please be mindful and do not block farmers’ entry into their fields, which are often adjacent to the trail and parking spots.

Trail traffic is generally very light to non-existent north of Hough Rd. There are a very few walkers/hikers, a very few bike riders.

There is evidence of horses.

Wildlife:
Endless deer, rodents, an occasional fox or coyote. The marsh areas are full of aquatic birds such as various species of ducks, gees, kingfishers, swallows. A couple of these ponds appear to have beaver lodges as well as muskrats. The upland areas have pheasant, woodcock, wood ducks, endless perching birds, raptors, clinging birds, and about everything else imaginable.

Final note:
While there is little change in elevation on this trail, the rough, uneven surface of the trail north of Bordman Rd. make this other than a casual ride through the country. I averaged less than 10 mph through the northern sections of this trail. Some sections of the trail go through country that is not easily accessed by the country roads. Carry a cell phone, although there are areas of limited or no coverage.

Mileage:
Boardman Rd. entry to Dryden ==> 4.7 miles
Dryden to Imlay City ==> 5.9 miles
Imlay City to Lum ==> 6.2 miles
Lum to Kings Mill ==> 3.5 miles
Total mileage ==> 14.3 miles

November 5, 2008

The Polly Ann follows the old Pontiac, Oxford & Northern rail line. The “official” trail is marked from Oxford north to Leonard and to Bordman Rd. but the right-of-way is marked and quite passable (for hikers, horse, and mountain bikes) quite a bit further. That is the topic of this article.

The trail entry is at Leonard, Michigan which is roughly 13.5 miles north of the center of Rochester, Michigan on Rochester Rd (also known as Forest St, in Leonard.) There is a parking lot south of the grain elevator on E. Elmwood St. (also known as Leonard Rd.), 1 block east of the blinker light in Leonard. There is a toilet there that is clean and maintained (according to my wife.) For drinks and something to eat there are two small party stores in Leonard at the northwest and northeast corners of Forest St and Elmwood St. The trail heads NNE from Leonard through rolling upland woods and farm country. The surface is paved for ½ mile to Gerst Rd. then is packed stone dust for another mile to Bordman Rd., the county line between Oakland and Lapeer Counties.

The trail then becomes semi-improved two-track whose surface ranges from stone dust to dirt to road bed ballast. The right-of-way is mowed so not particularly brushy, but it is a “trail ride” from here on. It is quite passable on a mountain bike. My wife and I ride a tandem but from this point north a tandem team would be greatly challenged, due to trail surface conditions.

At Hough Rd. the trail is less improved, rail bed ballast and gravel. Another mile north the trail climbs a steep embankment up to General Squier Rd. This road is paved and traffic travels at 55 mph, so be careful. The embankment on the other side is just as steep. Walking one’s bike up and down may be a good idea. At General Squier Rd., visible to the west of the trail crossing, there is a commercial farm/vineyard that has produce and fruit for sale in season. It is a worthwhile side trip.

Continuing NNE along the trail, the trail surface gets rougher, down to single track with uneven surfaces, which can be wet and occasionally slippery after a local rain. The trail crosses Casey Rd. about 1/4 mile east of General Squier Park and about ½ mile east of Pioneer Cemetery which has the graves some of the earliest settlers in the area. The trail passes through numerous marshy areas. There are well-maintained bridges across marshy areas all along the trail.

The trail crosses Dryden Rd. just east of the main intersection in Dryden, Michigan. There are stores and a restaurant or two and also a gas station. In October 2008 there was a pavilion under construction on the south side of Dryden Rd. just west of the trail crossing. Dryden Rd. is within the village limits, nonetheless traffic is quick there and caution while crossing is advised.

From Dryden the trail is mowed but single track. The trail will cross Hollow Corners Rd. then Sutton Rd. Shortly thereafter is Hunters Creek Rd., Summers Rd. and then Interstate-69. Summers Rd. is a north-south road unlike the others (This note to help orientation.) As the rider crosses under I-69, the large concrete abutments to guard the highway bridge pylons against train derailment may be noticed. The next road is Newark Rd. The country is mainly agricultural with large soy bean and corn farms. There are also stretches of woods.

At Black’s Corner Rd. (another north-south road) the trail becomes paved for something less than a mile. On the west side of the trail is a pickle factory. The trail crosses under the old Grand Trunk Western (now Canadian National) line which travels east to Port Huron and into Canada.

This portion of the trail passes west of the old main business district of Imlay City. At W. 4th Street, one may head east to N. Main St. for a ride around old Imlay City, the center of which is at N. Main and 3rd St. There are numerous restaurants, shops, and gas stations in the old section of town. It is a very typical Midwestern small agricultural/industrial-based town. There has been a substantial remodeling of the old business district that has been nicely done. There is a downtown pavilion and sitting area. There are ice cream shops (a nod to my wife.) There are numerous historic homes on side streets. The main business district of Imlay City has shifted to Van Dyke Ave. (M-53) which is further east This is extremely busy with a great deal of traffic as M-53 is the major north-south route between Detroit, I-69, and up into Michigan’s “thumb.”

The trail heads NNW out of Imlay City toward Lum, Michigan. Crossing back over Black’s Corner Rd. at Attica Rd. the trail returns to rough single track. At this point trail maintenance becomes spotty. Mowing seems to be perhaps once a year. The trail surface is rail bed ballast, dirt, and pebble. It may be wet after local rain and can be slippery. There also seemed to be the occasional railroad tie hidden barely beneath the trail surface that can dump the unwary.

The trail crosses Summers Rd. (north-south road) and then quickly crosses Imlay City Rd./Capac Rd./old M-21/78. Caution must be taken here. This is the old main highway between Port Huron and Flint. It is still a major surface thoroughfare. Traffic is very heavy and very fast here.

The trail crosses Bower Rd. and continues NNW through farm country. The next road crossing is Youngs Rd. (north-south road.).

The trail enters Lum, Michigan at Lum Rd., ½ block east of Mitchell Lake Rd. There is a party store in Lum that has ice cream (a nod to my wife), drinks, and makes pizza. The proprietors took pity on my wife and let her use the bathroom. Otherwise there are no public toilets (that we could find) in Lum.

The trail continues NNW swinging to North out of Lum headed toward Kings Mill. The agricultural country continues with soy bean fields, corn fields, an occasional sugar beet field, with occasional deep woods sections. The next road crossing is Stanton Lake Rd. There is one more crossing at Curtis Rd. before one arrives at Kings Mill. Kings Mill is on Lake Pleasant Rd., which is an extension of Rochester Rd. There is no formal trail entry here but there is a small community here and party store at the corner of Kings Mill Rd. Mill St., and Lake Pleasant Rd. where one may ask to park. There do not appear to be any public toilets (that we could find.)

Additional notes:
There are numerous creek crossings all along the way on bridges built and maintained by various clubs and civic organizations. The bridges are sound and well-maintained. One may choose to walk one’s bike across as at some of the approaches to the bridges there may be a difference in surface height from the approach, to the bridge deck, and back to the following approach.

Long sections of the trail run through some fairly deep woods and marshy areas. In warm weather insect repellent is advised. There are numerous deer in the area as well, so to guard against ticks as well as biting flies, an insect repellent with DEET may be advisable.

Michigan temperatures in July and August can reach into the 80’s and occasionally 90’s. Carry sufficient water.

At most of the road/trail crossings, there is sufficient parking for one or two cars to get on the shoulder to load and off-load bicycles. Please be mindful and do not block farmers’ entry into their fields, which are often adjacent to the trail and parking spots.

Trail traffic is generally very light to non-existent north of Hough Rd. There are a very few walkers/hikers, a very few bike riders.

There is evidence of horses.

Wildlife:
Endless deer, rodents, an occasional fox or coyote. The marsh areas are full of aquatic birds such as various species of ducks, gees, kingfishers, swallows. A couple of these ponds appear to have beaver lodges as well as muskrats. The upland areas have pheasant, woodcock, wood ducks, endless perching birds, raptors, clinging birds, and about everything else imaginable.

Final note:
While there is little change in elevation on this trail, the rough, uneven surface of the trail north of Hough Rd. make this other than a casual ride through the country. I averaged less than 10 mph through the northern sections of this trail. Some sections of the trail go through country that is not easily accessed by the country roads. Carry a cell phone, although there are areas of limited or no coverage.

Mileage:
Leonard to Dryden ==> 6.2 miles
Dryden to Imlay City ==> 5.9 miles
Imlay City to Lum ==> 6.2 miles
Lum to Kings Mill ==> 3.5 miles
Total mileage ==> 21.8 miles

We've been riding the rails-to-trails around Oakland County all summer and the Polly Ann is our favorite. It's geography covers the gamut from pastures to lakes to deep woods. Along the way are some of Michigan's most charming small towns; Lake Orion, Oxford, and Leonard. On one ride, we stopped for lunch in downtown Oxford, which has renovated its early 20th Century buildings and restored its small town Americana ambiance. Looking out the window of Red Knapp's American Grill made us feel much removed from the Detroit metro area, especially after the bike ride to get there.

On a subsequent Polly Ann ride, we stopped in the tiny village of Leonard to have a sandwich. We found a "general store" on the northwest corner of Leonard's main intersection. Expected to find pre-packaged day-old sandwiches. Much to our surprise, sandwiches were prepared for us. The good folks there even brought them to us at the picnic table outside the store. The bread was fresh baked and the ingredients fresh and delicious. As we were mounting our bikes to leave, the man who made our lunch stepped outside to ask us how we liked it. He was obviously proud of his work, and pleased that we enjoyed it. All that, and the prices were very reasonable.

That day, we also rode up to the Lapeer County border, and were surprised to find the trail beyond was un-surfaced and quite rough. Since we were riding 70's ten-speed bikes, we only went a short distance further. It wasn't as though we didn't want to go further, as the trail is heavily wooded and very inviting. It is cleared and groomed, but it's strictly virgin earth beneath the wheels. That stretch will just have to wait until we're equipped with some good mountain bikes. A hybrid with shocks might also smooth it out.


Rode polly ann for first ime on sunday and went from Drahner rd to Bordman rd. Excelllent.

"The trail actually goes all the way to the tiny hamlet of Kings Mill in central Lapeer County. (owned by the DNR, managed by Lapeer County Parks).
I reagularly walk the trail from the ""town"" of Lum to the end. It is very scenic, a little rugged but usually well mowed.
Mtn Bikes should be able to ride this stretch. You'll pass through wooded areas, beautiful wetlands and meadows with lots of wildflowers. Very few houses are within view of the trail in this area.
You will almost always see deer and a few resident pheasants.
Coyote, fox, raccoons, & lots of songbirds may also been seen by a quiet observer.
Several years ago, a black bear was sighted near Kings Mill. (And was unfortunatly shot by an over-zealous land-owner.)
The trail is especially beautiful in the fall but keep an eye out for hunters on the adjoining properties.
I almost always have the trail to myself when I hike."

"Contrary to previous reviews, since spring 2007, the surface has been redone and is good for a road bike from Indianwood until about 2 mi N of Leonard. The 1.5 mi through Oxford is asphalt. N of 2 mi N of Leonard, only a Mountain Bike (or if you're tough, a hybrid with some knobbies) is recommended. I've seen hawks, deer, and otters on this trail. It is pretty, particularly in all stretches NE of Hosner Rd. and further N past Leonard. The bridge over M24 (Lapeer Rd.) is finished in Oxford. If you are looking for any restaurants to stop at, the only places are (a) about 1.5 mi. E of the trailhead on Indianwood in Lake Orion, (b) the crossing at Burdick in Oxford, (c) about 2 blocks S of the bridge over M24 in Oxford, or about 2 mi. E of the Hosner Rd crossing on Lakeville Rd.(in Lakeville). In Leonard & Dryden they laughed when we asked about a restaurant. This is a nice ride which crosses suburban, farm, and wood land."

The new crushed limestone surface (Sept 2006) is great! This is a huge improvement. The bridge over M-24 in downtown Oxford is up but not yet complete. This is an excellent trail!

Just wondering why the bridge on this trail is out between Sutton Rd. and Hollow Corners and how long it will be out. Thank you.

"Having ridden this trail at least four times from Indian-wood Road in Lake Orion to Imlay City, I can tell you that it is fabulous. The scenery is lovely, the trail rough enough to be an adventure, and a first-rate riding experience. The only way it will be ruined is if well-meaning folk pave it to death and make it fit only for rollerbladers and walkers. Right now, it is truly a gem."

The trail surface is almost complete for the entire trail length. Crushed limestone for all but 3 miles which will be paved in Oxford and Leonard. I just was on the trail from Drahner rd to north of Lakeville. The trail is in excellent shape. The bridge over M24 is under construction and should be complete by the end of the year. YAHOO!!!

Come on Lapeer keep it going.

"Very well done, nice and smooth trail, can't wait till the bureacrats of Lapeer county get off their asses and complete their leg of the trail, hats off to Oakland County!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Residents living on trail need to curtail dogs from charging at people. I live and pay taxes on the trail but do not feel safe due to dogs chasing me. The regarding dogs is that they must be on a leash - one resident went as far as to say that there were other places to run but his dog lives here.

"The trail is very nice from Mill Road to Leonard Road. There are lots of animals to see like deer, rabbits and turkeys. It is a nice trail but the loose rocks are a pain in the neck. I like the trail and I will ride it again sometime soon."

"The trail has some rough going but is quite scenic. It's definitely not for beginners, and fat tires are recommended. It would be a good trail for training. You can also follow this trail south for about four miles from the southern trailhead. You have to go around the golf course. Go east on Indianwood to Josyln (about 0.3 miles), turn right on Joslyn and go to the end (about one mile). Turn right and go about 0.2 miles and you will see the trail start up again going south. This detour is mostly asphalted sidewalk."

"This path is very bad. There are tons of rocks, no shade and there's an industrial lake next to a ""Bates motel-ish"" industrial structure. The water has a very weird color. As you traverse north, there is no indication where the trail ends. This is not a pleasant experience."

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