Tammany Trace

Louisiana

Tammany Trace Facts

States: Louisiana
Counties: St. Tammany
Length: 27.4 miles
Trail end points: N. Theard Street (Covington) and Neslo Road (Slidell)
Trail surfaces: Asphalt
Trail category: Rail-Trail
ID: 6015938
Trail activities: Bike, Inline Skating, Wheelchair Accessible, Horseback Riding, Walking

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Tammany Trace Description

Situated to the north of New Orleans across Lake Pontchartrain, the Tammany Trace was Louisiana's first rail-trail. The Trace, as it’s known to locals, is so named because it traces across St. Tammany Parish, connecting the communities of Covington, Abita Springs, Mandeville, and Lacombe.

Along the paved pathway, you'll experience the piney woods and moss-draped oaks that earned the area its Ozone Belt nickname. In the late 1800s, New Orleanians seeking respite from the oppressive heat of the coastal plain chose this as a vacation spot. Today, the trail passes many of their stately retreats.

If you begin your journey on the trail's western end in Covington, be sure to peek into the H.J. Smith and Sons General Store and Museum for a glimpse into the town’s past. The trailhead in Covington is also home to a museum and hosts the Covington Farmers Market every Wednesday during the growing season.

Seven miles to the east is the quaint town of Abita Springs, home to the famed Abita Brewpub, which serves a pleasant lunch at trailside seating (park at adjacent Abita Springs Park). The famous local beer and root beer are brewed nearby. For a quirky experience, check out the Abita Mystery House, a trailside attraction of unusual goods that will leave you with plenty of stories.

From Abita Springs, the trail heads south to Mandeville, where a renovated train station now serves as a community trailhead. Looking to get a glimpse into the famed jazz scene of Louisiana? If you’re in town on the night when it is open for a performance, a visit to the Dew Drop Jazz and Social Hall is an absolute must. If you're out during the weekend, stop by the Saturday morning market at the Mandeville trailhead to browse handmade items and sample a variety of local foods.

Beyond Mandeville, the trail leads southeast through a wetlands landscape. This is the Louisiana of Deep South lore. You'll come within several blocks of Lake Pontchartrain before angling inland toward the bayou. A worthwhile side trip here is the 2,800-acre Fontainebleau State Park, where the brick ruins of a sugar mill built in 1829 still remain. This park is a bird-watcher’s dream, and the professionals at the nature center can give you tips on how to spot some of the region’s finest feathered friends.

The Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge lies between the small fishing town of Lacombe and the lake and offers endless opportunities to explore. The refuge’s visitor center, just off the trail, is a great place to start. If you have a few extra hours to spare, rent a kayak or fishing gear to see a different side of the bayou.

Currently the trail ends at the Slidell-Carollo trailhead, but there are plans to continue the Tammany Trace to downtown Slidell at Heritage Park.

Parking and Trail Access

Parking is available at five places along the trail. To reach the Tammany Trace trailhead from the west end point, take I-12 east to LA 59 north in Abita Springs, cross Little Creek and turn left on Koop Drive. Rangers staff a visitor center in a green caboose past the St. Tammany Parish government building. Park beside the caboose.

Tammany Trace Reviews

What an amazing trail! We sailed along on this flat paved partially-shaded surface loved every minute until I got a migraine and had to stop after only seven miles. 😞 Plan to try again tomorrow.

1st time, long distances riding, picked a good trail to start. We found it to be very nice, wide, clean and shaded for a sunny day, I was concerned about not being able to use the restroom, well you do have plenty places to stop with the right facilities. Highly recommended! Lots of places to stop, sit and stretch, along the trace. We enjoyed the streams, squirrels and the turtle pond @ marker 13.

Enjoyed a great round trip ride on the Trace! The trail is very well maintained and regularly monitored. I did have a hard time finding anyone in the Trailhead centers even though I was there during open hours. No biggie, very enjoyable ride. Note that there's a bike shop at the Covington end and about midway.

Accordion

absolutely beautiful ride ,, well paved and very scenic ,,,,goes through the woods ,, very peaceful !

We had great fall weather for our ride today. The leaves are turning and the sky is blue. We started at the SE end at the Slidell trailhead. Staff was on the trail and at bridge over bayou near St.Tammany Parish trailhead (which closes @5:06pm) The trail is well maintained and is well used by the community. One ranger we spoke to has met people from all over the world traveling the trail. The trails website and this site give accurate descriptions of the trail. There are a lot of things to do along the trail and facilities are available. Be sure to leave the trail to visit or camp at Fontainebleau State Park. Mandeville has some beautiful sites to see. We had lunch in Abita and turned around for the return trip today. We've visited the Covington trailhead and the bike shop right on the trail previously, and I can say you will enjoy that end as well.

Rode this trail from the Koop Dr. trailhead north for about 7 miles. Flat, straight ( in this section ), and well-maintained made this a pleasure to ride upon.

Did the whole trail Covington to Slidell and back. There were plenty of fun stops along the way

Being from Louisiana but now living on the coast of Mississippi, I would suggest doing this ride in the fall or winter because of the heat and humidity in our deep south summers. If you do shorter rides, you can manage but you have to be able to handle the temps. Lots of beautiful trees and wildlife to view. Cool places to stop and get a bite/beer. Flat surfaces, no hills, clean. You will not be disappointed....


I am writing to share a wonderful experience I recently had on your Rails to Trail during a vacation to Mandeville from Raymond, Mississippi. My husband and I have recently taken up biking as a hobby that provides both leisure and exercise to ward off at least some of the unfortunate side effects of aging.

On what turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year, we lit out on your trails to enjoy a few hours of riding in a new environment. We were amazed at the size of the rabbits, the lovely landscape and the overall quality of the trail infrastructure; however, the most noted aspect of the ride was the blistering, relentless HEAT. About 28 miles into the ride I began to have a headache, blurry vision and nausea due to the heat. My husband was not concerned and encouraged me to press on to shady spots for breaks as he was not so affected by the heat. On our third break after the turnaround point, I told him to call 9-1-1. About the time I thought I would pass out due to heat exhaustion, two rangers, CJ and Allen, appeared to literally save my day!

They pulled out ice cold water and called a cab for me to take me back to the inn where I was staying. They loaded my husband’s bike in the cab and called ahead to the next ranger on the trail to have water ready for my husband who would complete the ride back on my bike. Were it not for the serendipitous timing and preparation of these rangers, I would likely have been hospitalized. Instead, I was able to enjoy a sno cone compliments of my cab driver, Mo, and make my dinner reservation later that same day.

I understand that governments face increasing economic pressure to meet many competing demands. I hope this letter serves as an endorsement for the wonderful rangers and trail program that you have established. I will continue to visit your parish and trails and promote both as a place where one can experience leisure, natural beauty and wonderful Southern hospitality. I hope you will recognize the excellent service of CJ and Allen and continue to offer these wonderful experiences to St. Tammany natives and visitors alike.

With gratitude,

Betsy Crook

One day we rode from Covington trailhead to Mandeville trailhead and back (about 25 miles). Lots of pretty scenery, shade, and other interests, like Abita Springs, bridges, playground, and a tunnel. There's a restaurant within 2 blocks of the Covington trailhead that is really good, too! (Mattina Bella) Another day we rode from Mandeville to Slidell. Had problems at the beginning so we went into Mandeville and found a store, The Bike Path, to help us. Great service from them and we were back on the trail in no time! This section was more remote. We saw a beautiful area full of blooming lilypads and also enjoyed checking out the Lacombe drawbridge. There are a few picnic tables along the way and most are maintained well. Loved this even in the heat of summer - my advice is go early in the morning!

Rode the Tammy trace trail and the experience in every way was exceptional.

... you start and end at the Mandeville trailhead. Mandeville has the most elaborate trailhead facilities I have seen. Plus there is a coffee shop right at the parking and the "not to be missed" Old Rail Brewpub within sight for the afternoon wrap up.
We rode from Mandeville to Slidell and return on a February day. Not shown on the Traillink map are the restrooms at the draw bridge just east of Lacombe.
Also, prompted by a previous reviewer, we made the side trip into Fontainebleau State Park. A mile+ trip off the trail leads you to a beach and a fishing pier out into the lake. $2 admission, free for 62+.
For another nice view of the lake ride one of the quiet side streets to the SW in Mandeville to enjoy a long lake-front park with paths along the shore.



Was much better before they added a speed limit of 15 MPH. Serious cyclist will now go elsewhere.

In Louisiana shade is more than a want -it is necessary. Out of all of the trails I've been to in Louisiana -this is the best! There are interesting stops along the way. You can break the 31 miles up. My first bike journey started in Abita Springs, which is a charming town, and ended in Mandeville riding along the lakefront, before we turned around and headed back. The next trip we picked up in Mandeville and headed east trying to complete the Trace, but we spent so much time exploring Fountainbleau Park, that we had to save the drawbridge for another day. Also, there are delicious restaurants to try, which are close to the trail. A beautiful, tree lined journey, enjoyed by serious bikers, as well as kids on training wheels and everyone in between!

It was a nice ride. I wish that there weren't breaks in the trail where you have to cross streets. I love the area of Abita Springs! Great feel. I can't wait to go back!

I traveled the Tammany Trace during the late spring 2025. Awesome trail, well maintained and very pleasant to travel.

Loved it!!!

This is an awesome trail, well maintained and a joy to ride, Downtown Covington and Downtown Abitia Springs are full of things to see and do. The kids connection playground in Mandeville is awesome, take de te and enjoy the Tammany Trace.¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿

Nice easy, flat surface. Trail is really clean. Trail maintenance personnel continually patrol trail and are very courteous and helpful. Really enjoyed our ride!

We really enjoy the trail. It is flat and well kept up. You don't have to be an experienced cyclist to enjoy it. It's interesting to visit the towns along the way.

Rode an easy 30 miles - Mandeville to Slidell and back. Flat, very well maintained. Hope to go back soon to complete the Trace -- from Covington to Mandeville!

It's flat as a pancake, straight as an arrow and has beautiful pine forest scenery. I enjoyed it immensely.

We are down South for a month and having biked the Long Leaf Trace in Hattiesburg, Ms..wanted to try the Tammany Trace in Slidell. We are so glad we did. My wife rated the trail an A+ and she is a hard grader. The trail was flat, smooth for the most part and where it had been patched it was well done. The trace was not overly busy on the Sunday afternoon in February but the folks we met were very friendly and helpful. The Trace is easy to find and parking was plentiful right by the path. We will be back!

We biked a portion of this lovely trail in mid January. It is very well maintained and runs through a great part of the state of Louisiana. All levels of cyclists were using the trail. Many parking options as well as rest spots. I wished I lived closer to this trail. Please plan one like it for the Lafayette ,LA area!!

Flat as can be,great asphalt condition,mostly in shade unless sun is directly overhead-tall trees on both sides.Great snoballs(snow cones if you're not a native) plus food/drink next to trail in Mandeville at Shiver Shack-they rent bikes-single speed cruisers,mutlispeed mountain bikes,trailers,trailer bikes,did have a 52 cm Scott CR1 road bike.Few spots next to trail to get fluids/snacks.Quite a few street crossing but most have little traffic.

You can start your ride to the Trace in Fountainbleu park (at the lake). Huge parking lot. Nice restrooms. If you go early it might remind you of Cade's Cove in the Smokies. This morning I saw a total of 14 deer and 5 wild hogs. Owls hooting in the distance. Some easy off road trails there, too. You can actually pedal your bike about 100 yards to a pavilion out over the lake. Really nice.

The St. Tammany Trace is a fantastic bike trail, especially the stretch between Mandeville and Slidell! I only wish I lived closer so I could enjoy this jewel, everyday! The local characters you'll meet, while resting at the Lacombe ranger station/draw bridge, are every bit as interesting as the Southeast Louisiana wildlife you'll encounter during your ride! Pine tree woods, bayous, swamps, and quaint, historic towns are all part of the Tammany Trace experience!

We loved this trail. It was easy biking since it was very flat. The weather was sunny and hot when we biked this trail but the trail is so shaded that we didn't even notice the heat. We stayed in Mandeville and loved the farmers markets, the great places to eat and all the nice people. It was like going back in time to a little Mayberry.

My brother and I rode the entire trail today and enjoyed it very much. Can't wait to ride it again.

We started in Covington and ended in Slidell and then returned to Covington. It was a great relaxing and flat ride. Take bug spray and suntan lotion. We crossed the bridge where we had a friendly conversation with the Ranger. Great day for riding and highly recommended.

We started at the Mandeville Trail head (not to be confused with the Mandeville Visitor Center) and before starting on the trail rode down down to the Lake Ponchtrain lake front. It was a scenic ride along the lake. We then headed back to the Tammany Trace on Girod Street and stopped at the Beach House Bar and Grill for lunch, which was really nice. There are several restaurants in this area. Then we hit the trail heading east. The trail was perefectly flat, wide and smooth - a great riding surface. Scenery was good also. We rode several miles beyond the draw bridge and ranger station at Lacombe then headed back to Mandeville. After 25 miles on the trail we ended the day at Old Rail Micro-brewery which is conveniently located on the trail at the Mandeville Trail head. It was very good.

We wanted to detour off the trail to ride the paths in Fountainbleu Park but after fighting 20 mph wind all day decided to save this excursion for another day. It was nice that park rangers were patrolling the trail.

Summary - this is an outstanding trail and we can't wait to ride it again.

We rode from the trail head in Slidell to Mandeville (about 15 miles.) We stopped at "Louie and the Redheaded Lady" for lunch (delicious!) in Mandeville before heading back to Slidell. What I loved most about this ride was the beautiful setting. There are lots of tall trees that shade most of the path, so riding when it is a little hot out was not too bad. (The temperature was in the low 90s the day that we rode.) There are some beautiful river crossings and scenery all along the way. You are never too far from civilization if you need to stop for any reason. Plus, we saw three different rangers patroling the path, so if you ran into any difficulty, there are people there that could provide assistance.

I would definitely recommend this trail to all levels of bike riders. We were riding our hybrid bikes, but it would be great for road bikes because it is paved in asphalt the entire way. Because it is so flat and paved, most any kind of pedal-powered vehicle would be appropriate. They were doing some construction that we had to dismount and go around, but they had signs up warning you, so it was not a surprise.

There are lots of roads that you have to cross over, which makes it a little more dangerous, but the drivers were all very considerate and stopped even when they did not have a stop sign. Once you get into Mandeville, the road crossings are all four-way stops, so it is a little less dangerous, but because of the road crossings, I deducted one star.

Great path that is very well maintained making for a great ride!

My husband and I rode this on our tandem. It is quite flat and was very enjoyable. One day we started at the eastern end at Slidell/Carollo. There were nice facilities there. If you are coming from the south to get there off I10, take the second road that says it is Rt 190 and also says W Gause. If you would like to put it in your GPS, it is actually 2289 W Gause. Our only criticism is that you have to cross alot of streets that go from 190 to the homes closer to the lake. If you were familiar with the path you would become familiar with which ones are busy streets. Our second day we started on the west end in Covington. There is a cute park there but we could not access the facilities that day. There are several parks with pavillions and restrooms along this western part of this trail. Be sure to stop at Abita Springs at the Brew Pub. It is literally right next to the path. Had a beer with friendly locals. There is an old gas station/now museum that looks like it is straight out of the 1930"s in Abita Springs as well. Tammany Trace has their own website with descriptions of each stop along the path. This is definitely one we will ride again if we are in the New Orleans area.

For anybody looking for a nice, flat trail to ride their trikke, the Trace is the best place around!

I ride my trikke once a week at the Trace.

If any trikkers want to meet up with me and ride, go to my trikke club at MYTRIKKE.COM and join me for some fun, awesome rides.

My husband and I rode from Covington to Mandeville and back and it was a wonderful ride. We started out early and had very little company. As the day progressed we saw more people and a few groups training. This is a nice easy ride. Four stars because of lots of road crossings. Trailheads have great facilities and the trail is well maintained. We saw two rangers checking on the trail on our trek. Of course we had to stop at the Abita Brew Pub for a cold one. Great day, Great ride.

We rode the trail in April. The trail was very well maintainec. It was ride was beautiful and the weather was perfect. They were building a new trailhead at the drawbridge. The wetlands beside the trail provided a variety of plants. Covington is a very nice town in which to stay.

Just finished a 2761 mile, 27 day cross country tour from San Diego to Jacksonville, Fl. We happened upon the Trace from friendly folks in a convenience store in Covington who told us about it. What a welcome break from Rt. 71 and 190 ! The trail is perfectly paved the entire way, clearly marked once you're on it. We rode 22 miles to Slidell in about an hour, in the shade. What relief after leaving Hammond in a heat index of 117.

We rode this trail in April 2010. We started at Abita Springs where we had a wonderful soup-salad-sandwich lunch at the Breakaway Cafe, across the highway from the Brew Pub. There is parking nearby and we rode the trail in two diections, before and after lunch. At this time of year wisteria and azeleas were in bloom adding to the beauty of this ride.

I've been planning a ride from Mobile, AL to Hammond, LA and came across the Tammany Trace.

I've noticed that the TrailLink Google Map shows the trail continuing east beyond US 190 to North Slidell. However, the new Google Map bicycling direction option shows it only going as far as Neslo Road, with a rail line continuing east to N. Slidell. Several street views confirm that it this portion is still a rail line.

My wife and I just rode the Trace. we took two days and it was great. In Manderville we went down and rode around the lake front. We toured the state park. A great trail.

We just spent a week in Abita Springs and rode on the Tammany Trace. Even though we had not ridden at all this year, we found the trail to be easy riding. The scenery was great; there were many places to stop. I wish there were places like this everywhere! The surface was wonderful, even for a rode tandem.

I'm a life long mandevilliean. When I was a kid, a very long time ago, I walked the rail to school, smashed pennys when the trains went by and though rock from the bed at snakes. YES, lots of snakes. But if your coming to bike/hike the trace you need to take the side trips. In Mandeville, soon after the 190 under pass, take coffee street to the lake front. Bike the lake front then take girod street back to the trace. This will take you the trial head, pass many GREAT place to eat, have coffee { Maxein's } and if your lucky, see free music at the trial head. Covington and Abita Springs are also great side trips.

I live in the area of the trace and have gotten much enjoyment out of it.

As of Tuesday Sep. 16, the new Bayou Lacombe drawbridge is open, thus completing the 30+ miles of the trace, from Slidell to Abita Springs.

The Bridge has a ranger stationed at it to operate it, from dusk till dawn, everyday. It is put in the open position during the night.

On this site it currently says that the legs of the trace are from Slidell to Lacombe, and from Lacombe to Abita Springs; now it would read: Slidell to Abita Springs.

And fortunately for visitors coming from the Mandeville Trailhead, the area now opened up by the bridge (the length from Bayou Lacombe into Slidell), is one of the most beautiful areas of the trail.

According to the Times Picayune (4/18/08):
Tammany Trace bridge taking shape
http://blog.nola.com/tpnorthshore/2008/04/photo_tammany_trace_bridge_tak.html

The long-awaited Tammany Trace crossing over Bayou Lacombe began to take shape Friday with the installation of the vertical tower for a new 80-foot drawbridge.

The structure, built by Land and Marine Fabricators Corp. of Slidell, was barged early Friday from Bayou Bonfouca to Lake Pontchartrain and up Bayou Lacombe to the recreational trail.

There, workers bolted the structure to the steel 8-foot-wide deck of the $1.94 million span being built by McDonald Construction of Slidell.

Parish officials say they expect the new bridge to be completed next month and be opened shortly afterwards.

When the bridge opens for trace traffic, 20 more miles of the recreational trail -- from the bayou west to downtown Covington -- will become easily accessible to trail users east of the bayou.

For trace users west of the bayou, another six miles of the trail, from the bayou east to near Thompson Road west of Slidell, will be accessible.

Plans call for the fixed-end drawbridge to be down during the day for trail users, with a trace ranger opening the span for boat traffic. The bridge will remain open for marine traffic after sunset, when the trace is closed.

Long-range plans call for constructing a trailhead, with a ranger station and restrooms, on the western bank of the bayou. Plans also call for eventually extending the trace from the Slidell/Carollo trailhead near Thompson Road into Olde Towne Slidell.


"A tunnel was built under Hwy 190 to remedy that problem. We still ride to Bayou LaCombe to ""wish upon a bridge"" though. We could actually use a tunnel at Hwy. 36 to Covington too. My husband and I are over 55 and ride the Trace every weekend."

"A very nice trail. We were impressed with the trailheads and the adequate parking. It was very comforting to see the amount of security on this trail. However, there are some bridges out that limit how far you can ride in some directions. We first rode from the Slidell/Carollo trailhead, but after six miles the bridge over the Bayou Lacombe is out. Then we rode from the Tammany Trace Trailhead and found out that after four miles the bridge over the Albita River is out. Nevertheless, this is a great trail and well worth the effort."

"This beautiful trail is actually a former Gulf, Mobile and Ohio branch line, not Illinois Central. In the 1970s, the two lines merged briefly and became the Illinois Central Gulf, a new line. They later separated again.

Anyway, we rode this trail over the Thanksgiving holidays in 2004 from Abita Springs to Fontainebleu. This is a beautiful trail, especially from Mandeville and Eastward. Numerous live oaks, tupelo or cypress tees, and many bayous. We rented bikes at a place in Abita with only a few ancient bikes; there is now a new place with many modern bikes near the Mandeville depot.

Winter riders should be aware that from Abita to Mandeville, the trail goes directly south and the sun is in your eyes. It turns abruptly East in Mandeville. Lots of shade except when you ride directly into a low sun.

In summer, remember to bring mosquito stuff, as you are in the swamps. When the bridge over the large bayou between Fontainebleu and Slidell is finished, that will be the most scenic section. Lots of police presence.

We ate lunch in Abita right near the trail -- the trail goes through the center of town and next to the famous spring. The trail is flat."

"We stayed at Trail's End B&B in Abita Springs, which is located right on the trail. It's a superb combination of trail and first class accomodations.

From the trail's end to Lacombe is about 21 miles. It's a nice run through some interesting mixture of rural and suburbia. On Saturdays, Mandeville has a farmer's market with food vendors and live music at their trailhead. It's a fun break and a good place to get a snack for the final leg to the Trail's End B&B.

There are several bike rental places and the owner of Trail's End B&B could not be more amenable to meet your needs. As an added plus, you can visit New Orleans for a little fun to cap your ride."

"We made our first trip to the Tammany Trace a week ago and it was absolutely wonderful! We ended up riding the entire trail over the two days we were there. The first day we rode from Slidell to Bayou Lacombe and back. Then, we rode from Mandeville to Covington. Along the way, we ate lunch outside in Abita Springs at a quaint little restaurant where patrons arrived by car, horse, bike, and foot. The next day we rode from Mandeville to Bayou Lacombe and through Fountainbleau State Park. It was beautiful. We plan on returning for a long weekend and staying at the park for easy access to the trail. It was great to see so many people of all ages, races, and athletic abilities on so many different types of bikes out exercising and riding the trace. The trail personnel were very nice and helpful. I like the fact that there is security along the trail. Keep up the good work!"

We only had enough time to ride a few miles out from Abita Springs during lovebug season. We are impressed with the separate unpaved trail for horses. It is definitely safer for riders of both animals and bikes. Rest benches were few and far between without bike racks. Intersections are many and horrendously dangerous.

Be sure to keep your mouth covered during lovebug season! It takes a lot of Abita Beer to wash those bugs on down!

We rate this trail 6/10 because of the road crossings.

I have ridden all or a portion of this trail for the past three years whenever I travel through this area. It is well worth the time and is one of the most enjoyable rides between Texas and Mississippi.

This trail was a great antidote to the snow and cold at home. A very well done trail. Completing the bridge over the bayou at Lacomb and a road crossing into Covington will enhance the experience. We stayed at the Trails End B&B in Abita Springs and enjoyed the local restaurants; don't miss the UCM museum.

This is one of the best maintained and patrolled trails you'll find. Its patrolled by rangers on motor scooters and also by the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff's Department.

In the spring of 2000 a friend and I were riding the trail. He ran off the trail and suffered a broken ankle. Within 10 minutes the rangers had an ambulance there.

Outstanding!

"This was the first rail-trail that I have been on. My husband and I biked it a few weekends ago (only about 20 miles). We found the trail to be pleasant, easy to ride and full of friendly people. Not many places along the way to stop and get something to drink (it's hot and humid in the south)! However, we did stop at the Abita Springs Brew Pub and eat lunch. Excellent food and atmosphere. The beer is good too. Worth your time. You'll be glad you rode it."

"My wife and I biked the Tammany Trace and loved every minute of it. It is beautiful scenery. A well kept trail with security patrol. I can't say enough good things about it.

Try it, you will like it too."

We rode this wonderful trail in late March. We camped at Fontainbleu State Park and rode to Slidell and back and the next day from the park to Covington. The paving has just been completed from Abita Springs to US 90 in Covington.

None of the trail literature indicates that there is no bridge across Bayou Lacombe which is about halfway between the park and Slidell. By leaving the trail at the street that has the Lacombe sign and going a block over to US 190 you can get around this trail block. The road shoulders are wide here except for across the two bridges. Turning right at Carrol St. you can meander back to the trail on S. Oaklawn.

The trail is in good condition and the wildflowers are nice.

"This is a beautiful paved trail and, quite frankly, the only safe place to ride in Louisiana. There are several really good places to eat in Abita Springs and in Mandeville. There is a tunnel being built in Mandeville to get across a dangerous highway that should be completed by September, 2002. There are Rangers at the trailheads to help, protect, and give information. We have found them to be very nice folks.

My wife and I are in our sixties, and we find our 20-mile or so rides to be peaceful, fun, and energizing. The scenery is beautiful. The people you meet are friendly. You'll see lots of families on the trail: mom, pop, and the kids. For an enjoyable, healthful ride, this is the place. "

I rode from Abita Springs to Fontainbleau State Park as part of the May Cycle Mainstreet Ride. It was beautiful!

"I have ridden this trail twice now. The first time was just three weeks ago and it was great. The trail is absolutely beautiful. It runs through woods and swamps, and it is very well maintained. Trees shade the biggest portion of this trip. We biked from Abita Springs to Mandeville with a great rest area just over five miles out of Abita. There is an old caboose for the ranger station and a covered paivillion. Outside the restrooms there is a cool mister providing the pause that refreshes. Along the trail we saw deer, snakes, rabbits, a bobcat, an owl, and egrets. In Mandeville we stopped at a great little coffee shop called Java (something). Because of the shade and easy grade of the trail, we were able to make thirty miles in three hours (that is round trip). The rangers are an ever present entity, so there is no need for concern about safety. "

"Great bike ride ... flat and fast (in spite of the 20 mph posted speed limit) ... enjoy the natural beauty as you cruise along ... and when you're done, treat yourself to lunch and a beer at the Abita Springs Brew Pub & Cafe"

"This is a beautiful ride. During the warm months expect to see a lot of wildlife and wild flowers. The UCM Museum in Abita Springs is a very interesting tourist attaction with a good collection of bicycles, vintage and custom built."

"Although I haven't gone the whole route. I've gone from Mandeville to Lacombe and took a detour through the State Park on the way. If you go in the early morning before 8:00am you might encounter some of the wildlife there. Last year, the saturday before Easter I came accross a bobcat and what I thought was a racoon. You will also see an old cemetary and bridges over swamp area where you can view water lilies, cypress trees, and moss covered oaks. If you detour into the state park ($.50 admission)you will see some of the most beautiful moss covered oaks and an old sugar mill. There is a nature trail at the park that you can walk or if you have a mountain bike ride through and see the vast swamp area beyond the forested trail. "

"Will be attending the National Senior Olympics in July at Baton Rouge, looking for rider(s)to hit Tammany Trace trail."

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Lafitte Greenway

Louisiana - 2.6 miles

The Lafitte Greenway offers a 2.6-mile linear park through New Orleans, from the edge of the city’s French Quarter to Mid-City and the doorstep of its...

Crescent Park Trail

Louisiana - 1.4 miles

Crescent Park is a 1.4 mile linear park located on the banks of the Mississippi River, just outside New Orlean's popular French Quarter. Built as part...

Mississippi River Trail (Louisiana)

Louisiana - 60.8 miles

The Mississippi River Trail is a system of disconnected, paved trails on the levees along both banks of the Mississippi River in southern Louisiana....

Accordion

Tuxachanie National Recreation Trail

Mississippi - 12.1 miles

The Tuxachanie Trail is a National Recreation Trail offering a 12-mile hike through southern Mississippi's Desoto National Forest. A portion of the...

Baton Rouge Levee Bike Path

Louisiana - 4.8 miles

Baton Rouge Levee Bike Path links several downtown attractions along the Mississippi River. The Farr Park Equestrian Center, the USS Kidd Naval...

Longleaf Trace

Mississippi - 40.6 miles

Stretching nearly 41 miles northwest from the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg to small-town Prentiss, Longleaf Trace traverses...

Citronelle Walking Trail

Alabama - 2 miles

The Citronelle Walking Trail is a paved rail-trail through the Citronelle Railroad Historic District to points south in the small city in southwestern...

Mobile Airport Perimeter Trail

Alabama - 1.7 miles

On the southern end of Mobile, a short paved trail runs from Doyle Park, along the edge of the city's airport, to the waterfront. The park makes a...

Eastern Shore Trail

Alabama - 23.4 miles

The Eastern Shore Trail runs along the east side of Mobile Bay from Spanish Fort to Weeks Bay, passing through the communities of Daphne, Montrose,...

Ridgeland Natchez Trace Multi-Use Trail

Mississippi - 10.5 miles

Ridgeland Natchez Trace Multi-Use Trail offers a scenic trip paralleling Natchez Trace Parkway just north of Jackson. The 10-mile paved pathway begins...

Fort Morgan Road Trail

Alabama - 5.6 miles

Fort Morgan Road Trail begins just outside the western border of Gulf State Park and travels more than 5 miles west through the coastal community of...

Robertsdale Trail

Alabama - 2 miles

The Robertsdale Trail (a.k.a. Central Baldwin Rail-Trail) is a short linear route through the heart of Robertsdale that follows the former Louisville...

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