Three Notch Trail

Maryland

Three Notch Trail Facts

States: Maryland
Counties: Charles, St. Marys
Length: 11 miles
Trail end points: Deborah Dr. (Charlotte Hall) to Thompson Corner Rd. (New Market); Wildewood Blvd. (California) and Chancellors Run Rd. (California); John V. Baggett Park (Laurel Park) to SR 5 (Mechanicsville)
Trail surfaces: Asphalt
Trail category: Rail-Trail
ID: 6233596
Trail activites: Bike, Inline Skating, Wheelchair Accessible, Horseback Riding, Walking

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Three Notch Trail Description

Southern Maryland's Three Notch Trail is a work-in-progress under the guidance of St. Mary's County and other stakeholders. When complete, the recreational trail will extend 28 miles along an abandoned Washington, Brandywine and Point Lookout Railroad right-of-way from Hughesville in Charles County south to Lexington Park in St. Mary's County. The future southern endpoint will be at the access road for Naval Air Station Patuxent River; the trail thus has the potential to be a vital active transportation corridor for the base's thousands of workers.

As of 2013, three portions of the Three Notch Trail are open for use. In the north, the oldest section of trail begins at Thompson Corner Road/State Route 236 in New Market and whisks trail users past the Charlotte Hall Library, St. Mary's County Welcome Center, Charlotte Hall Veterans Home and Northern County Senior Center. North of the center, the trail runs past residences in Charlotte Hall before ending at the intersection of Deborah Drive and Leonardtown Road/State Route 5. Local Amish and Mennonite residents are permitted to bring horses and buggies onto this section of the trail as an alternative to the congested local highways.

A previously disconnected section of trail has recently been completed and is open between the town of Laurel Grove and the southern edge of Mechanicsville. The route begins at Laurel Grove's John V. Baggett Park, which contains basketball courts, tennis courts, baseball fields and softball fields. North of the park, the trail is enveloped by wooded scenery for nearly the entire length of the trek to Point Lookout Road/SR 5.

The southernmost open section of trail begins at the Wildewood Shopping Center at Wildewood Boulevard in the town of California. Private developers constructed much of the route south of this point; trail users should be aware that this portion of the Three Notch Trail courses between commercial properties and crosses numerous busy parking lot access roads. The trail currently ends in the south at Chancellors Run Road/State Route 237.

Future construction will extend the southern end of the trail to Pegg Road at the entrance to NAS Patuxent River, although work is contingent on the delayed planning, design and engineering of the proposed FDR Boulevard. St. Mary's County has set 2014 as the target date for the opening of the section between Mechanicsville and New Market. When this gap is filled, the northern part of the trail will run for an uninterrupted 11 miles from Charlotte Hall to Laurel Grove. The large gap between the Wildewood Shopping Center in California and John V. Baggett Park in Laurel Grove will be completed as funding becomes available in 2015 and beyond.

Parking and Trail Access

Parking for the Three Notch Trail can be found along the northern section at the St. Mary's County Welcome Center, Charlotte Hall Library and Northern Senior Center. If you plan on using the middle section of the trail, park at Gospel Light Baptist Church in Mechanicsville or at John V. Baggett Park in Laurel Grove off SR 235. Parking is plentiful for the southern trail segment in any of the large retail parking lots lining SR 235.

Three Notch Trail Reviews

I rode the length of the northern section of the trail from Charlotte Hall down to Baggett Park in Laurel Grove. I parked at the St. Mary’s Visitor Center, which is about a half block from the trail. From there I rode north to Deborah Drive, then doubled back and rode all the way south to Baggett Park and back to the Visitor Center. I am a leisurely rider, the whole trip took me 3 hours. The trail condition is excellent, smoothly paved. The scenery is lovely; farms and forestland, and you will also go past private homes. My only issue with this trail is that its proximity to two major roads, routes 5 and 235, means that the road noise is omnipresent through most of the ride. From Charlotte Hall north to Deborah Drive, the traffic noise is so loud you can’t hear the sounds of nature. It diminishes as you ride south, but it is still present for most sections of the trail. I rode on a Friday afternoon, starting shortly after noon. I only encountered a handful of other cyclists, and about the same number of pedestrians. At the terminus in Baggett Park, there is a new restaurant right next to the trail – so new that it does not have a name on the awning yet. They were smoking some barbecue out back that smelled delicious.

Rode the northern end 5 miles south.Well kept ,plenty of areas to stop and nice level ride .
Great shade on hot days, Plan on making this ride quite often.

11 miles of really nice trails, lots of shade. Starting at the park at Laurel Grove heading north it runs parallel to route 235, then paralleling route 5 at the Wawa. The new section from Wawa goes all the way through to a little past McKays in Charlotte Hall. If your biking it's hard to get up a whole lot of speed because of all the crossings. A relaxing and enjoyable fairly level ride.

Accordion

I live in the southern area and tried to ride the south section recently. It is incomplete and has very short segments that just end. The sidewalk that parallels the path is easier to ride. The street is also marked but traffic can be heavy and fast. Not suitable for a family ride with small children.

We biked the northern end of this trail. The trail is easy and goes through some beautiful farmland and historical areas. We stopped at the Amish market for some baked goods and rode around the old Anglican church and schoolhouse. Overall, a very pleasant ride! P.S. I hesitate to give such a good review because we really enjoyed the solitude.
:)

For the Three Notch Trail - check http://www.co.saint-marys.md.us/recreate/Threenotchtrail.asp
As for crime...a resent review of crime in the area of the trails (Three Notch) had to be moved a 1000 feet to find any crime in the area, and most was outside the trail in the areas of shopping districts.

This was our first time on this trail, it was very clean and we saw all kinds of people walking with and with out dogs and kids, other bikes, people of all ages, a busy but not too busy trail. It is very nicely done with new trees and fences to clearly mark the trail from private property. Now it was a 60 degree in January when we did this trail on our bikes let see how busy it will be this spring.

I have looked at some of the other blogs from DC and else where they have said that they have found crime going down where the trails were, because of the trails being more open and active. where before the areas where over grown and provided more cover for crime. Also they were commenting that some trails had police officers biking on them or voleteers to help keep watch .

We all have access to the web we can help find items ideas to help get thses trails built. I myself,have only found this site I dont even know who to get in touch with in St. Mary's County. Who is in charge?

2.6 miles long very smooth pavement. 2 spots along trail that the adjacent landowners property is full of garbage and yard art, but otherwise a very pristine natural peaceful ride. A nice respite from the 18 miles of road to and 14 miles of road back to my place. Parking lots at both ends of trail. Will be great when it is all finished.

Section 2 of trail is open. About 3 miles. Nice walking trail and wide.

We're new to biking and rode this trail today. We are sad that it's barely more than 3 miles, though nice that it's all asphalt. We encountered people walking their dogs, people running, folks riding their bikes like us, and two amish horse and buggies that we had to give right away too because they acted like it was "their road". Overall a nice ride, but not long enough. Disapointed that the future phases appear to have been caboshed, as the road just ends.

Biked this lovely 3.5 mile trail Nov 28, 2009. At the north end the trail starts at Deborah Drive at the St Marys county line just north of McKay's Plaza Mall on Rt 236. Eventually the trail will go 28 miles to Lexington Park near the Naval Air Station. Youker

AS an avid user of this rail-trail, I would like to provide an update: The 2.5 mile addition(known as Phase II) to the Three Notch rail-trail in Northers St. Mary's County, MD., is nearly complete. Nearly 2 miles of the new addition have been completed and is in use by the public. This 2 mile addition to the original 1 mile section is beautiful and peaceful with several shaded areas. The final .5 mile of the trail addition should be ready for use by the end of August. The entire 3.5 mile trail is asphalt. An additional 3 mile section of the Three Notch trail (Phase V) has received funding through Maryland's Program Open Space in the amount of $770,000.00 with construction expected to begin this Fall. This 3 mile section will span from the John Baggett Park in Laurel Grove to MD. Route 5 in Mechanicsville, MD. An additional 2 mile section of the trail (Phase III) in California, MD is being constructed now and will be completed in FY 09.

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