Delta de Anza Regional Trail

California

Delta de Anza Regional Trail Facts

States: California
Counties: Contra Costa
Length: 15 miles
Trail end points: Willow Pass Rd (nr. Bay Point) and East Cypress Rd (Oakley)
Trail surfaces: Asphalt
Trail category: Greenway/Non-RT
ID: 6430637
Trail activites: Bike, Inline Skating, Wheelchair Accessible, Walking

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Delta de Anza Regional Trail Description

The Delta de Anza Regional Trail is 15 miles long, running between Willow Pass Road at Route 4 near Concord and Main Street (Rt. 4) at E. Cypress Road in Oakley. The eastern end in Oakley intersects Marsh Creek Trail. The trail also intersects the developing Mokulumne Trail by Antioch Community Park. There is a break in the trail between Neroly Road and Ridgeline Drive.

The trail links neighborhoods, business districts, schools, parks and the Los Medanos Community College. In the parks you'll find plenty of rest areas, restrooms, drinking fountains and picnic areas. There are plans to extend the trail another 10 miles, including west to Martinez.

The county reports that the trail is mostly wheelchair accessible, though some sections can be steep, particularly those adjacent to Los Medanos College and Marchetti Park in Pittsburg and segments on both sides of Canal Park in Antioch. The trail over the Willow Pass in the direction of Evora Road in Bay Point to Willow Pass Road in Concord is long and steep.

The Delta de Anza Trail is named commemoration of the route taken by Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza during an 18th-century expedition in the region.

Parking and Trail Access

You can park along the trail in several places, including:

*at the east end where it meets the Marsh Creek trail (East Cypress Rd and Main Street)
*on the south side of Hillcrest Ave. near Terrace Dr.
*at both ends of Antioch Community Park (James Donlon Blvd. at Blythe Dr. and James Donlon Blvd. eastbound farther east of the main park entrance)
*at Ambrose Park (Bailey Rd. at Maylard St.; the Pittsburgh Bay BART station is also near here)
*at Ambrose Recreation and Park District ballfield (go to the the far end of the ballfield).

Delta de Anza Regional Trail Reviews

We live less than 2/10 mile from this trail, near Sommersville Road in Antioch.For review purposes there are four distinct parts of this trail
Starting from the east end, where this trail meets up with the Marsh creek trail this trail is good, though better signage would be appreceated, west to Highway 4. It is very flat and some is travelling on rural Delta roads with typical Delta farmland and rural residential land scenery. Going east from there one crosses under the highway and begins a VERY steep, a climb of about a hundred feet in less than 3/4 mile, next to the Antioch water plant with very boring scenery - which you won't notice because you will be working hard unless you stop and look back.On most clear days you will see all the way to the Sierra Nevadas. At the top of the climb, you enter a residential area and then start downhill along the canal. The canal is on one side of the trail, which is in a pleasantly naturally landscaped strip behind homes. This is a pleasant slightly downhill ride, with a few road crossings, al the way to Somersville Road, a little over 6 miles. Then south along Somersville a short distance to where the trail begins again going west in an EBMUD right of way. There are steep rises and down slopes in this area, no natural or other landscaping, and behind houses. It is in this 9 mile stretch that there has been a couple muggings and a police officer killed in the last couple decades. At the west end of that stretch you navigate on residential streets with little signage telling where the trail is. Plan on taking some time to find your way through the first time. Then the trail begins the steep passage next to Highway 4 over Willow Pass. The trail here is good, though steep, and separated from the highway by a concrete block wall. Once over the top it is a steep descent into Concord. But be careful because at the bottom of the descent is a cross road with traffic. You can't take advantage of the speed coasting down the hill, easily 20+ mph, to coast a way because of the traffic possibilities. This is the west end of the Delta DeAnza trail. I've only ridden it on my trike once - on the way to a doctor's appointment at Kaiser Martinez. I recommend the Delta DeAnza trail from the Marsh Creek Trail westerly to Somersville Road. OK with care and keeping aware of your surroundings from Somersville to Bailey Road. And as a fitness exercise (or if necessary) from Bailey Road over Willow Pass.

I ride most of this trail or parts of it several times a week. It changes regularly in the Bay Point neighborhoods. As far as trail condition, i.e the amount of broken glass. The rest of the trail in Pittsburg and Antioch are clean and well maintained. It does have several jogs that are NOT marked well, have a map or study google maps before you go. I have ridden the whole trail a couple of times. I don't ride much past Oakely very often. I would not ride this trail after dark in Antioch, Pittsburg or Bay Point. I sure there are lots of parties at night by what I see some mornings. Never had a problem in the mornings lots of people cycling, jogging and dog walking. In the evenings (after dinner) there are lots of families, (loose kids and chihuahua's) a freaking night mare don't know which is worse kids or dogs,most likely oblivious parents.

traveling through Pittsburg and BayPoint there have been strong arm robberies. Be observant of the surroundings.

Accordion

I first started riding this trail back in April of 2012 and have done it many times but since travelling on the Marsh Creek Trail, I find this one lacking. It would be a nice trail if it was taken care of better. There are areas along the trail that need some work and although some areas go near a park, it would be nice if there were places to sit. Some areas go behind homes and those areas need some work and if it could be a bit more beautified, maybe more people would use it. The Marsh Creek trail seems to be always traveled on and nice for a good portion of trail. This is not a bad trail but could use some help to make it shine.

We rode this trail end to end on 31 August, 2010. The trail is wide and in good condition but pretty uninteresting as far as scenery goes. Unfortunately it is poorly marked. The trail makes some jogs on streets for a block or two with nothing to tell you which way to go. There weren't too many people out on this warm, Tuesday afternoon so finding our way was through these jogs was harder than it needed to be. Unfortunately the markings on this trail are too typical. Far too many trails are poorly marked when it comes to finding your way the first time.

We missed a critical turn on the return and ended up in a local farmer's yard. He came out to meet us. He was cordial and gave us the directions we need to get back to the start. It wasn't his fault these directions took us up one of the steepest hills we have ever ridden.

I'm sure this is a useful trail for locals to use it to commute or to exercise but I wouldn't recommend going too far out of your way just to ride it.

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