Astoria, OR Running Trails and Maps

107 Reviews

Looking for the best Running trails around Astoria?

Find the top rated running trails in Astoria, whether you're looking for an easy short running trail or a long running trail, you'll find what you're looking for. Click on a running trail below to find trail descriptions, trail maps, photos, and reviews.

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Activities
Length
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Type
11 Results
Activities
Length
Surfaces
Type

Astoria Riverwalk

6.4 mi
State: OR
Asphalt, Boardwalk

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

22.7 mi
State: OR
Asphalt

Coweeman River Trail

4 mi
State: WA
Gravel

Cowlitz River Trail

2.5 mi
State: WA
Asphalt

Crown Zellerbach Trail

25.8 mi
State: OR
Gravel

Discovery Trail

8.3 mi
State: WA
Asphalt

Kestrel Dune Trail

1.9 mi
State: OR
Asphalt

Riverfront Trail (WA)

1.9 mi
State: WA
Asphalt

Seaside Promenade

1.5 mi
State: OR
Concrete

Warrenton Waterfront Trail

4.7 mi
State: OR
Asphalt

Willapa Hills Trail

56 mi
State: WA
Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Grass, Gravel
Trail Image Trail Name States Length Surface Rating
The Astoria Riverwalk, also known as the Astoria River Trail, stretches along part of the Astoria & Columbia River Railroad, providing a lively, nonmotorized tour of the city's waterfront. Along the...
OR 6.4 mi Asphalt, Boardwalk
The Banks-Vernonia State Trail stretches through the hills (east of the Coast Mountains) between its two namesake towns. The former railroad corridor—once part of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle...
OR 22.7 mi Asphalt
The Coweeman River Trail follows the dike on the west side of the river for 4 miles, giving access to the riverfront and Tam O'Shanter Park. The setting on the northern section is residential, and the...
WA 4 mi Gravel
The Cowlitz River Trail follows its namesake river along a dike on the east bank. The trail is asphalt and connects Kelso residents with the riverfront. The trail parallels the active BNSF line that...
WA 2.5 mi Asphalt
The Crown Zellerbach Trail, known locally as the CZ Trail, follows a former logging railroad through quiet and picturesque forests in northwest Oregon. Its east end begins at Multnomah Channel and,...
OR 25.8 mi Gravel
The Discovery Trail is one of the most scenic in the Pacific Northwest with outstanding views of the ocean, grassy dunes and forest groves. As it's named for Lewis and Clark’s explorative trek here...
WA 8.3 mi Asphalt
The Kestrel Dune Trail is one of several multi-use pathways in the park that houses historic Fort Stevens, built at the mouth of the Columbia River near the end of the Civil War. The trail begins on...
OR 1.9 mi Asphalt
Castle Rock's popular Riverfront Trail originates at its main trailhead in Lion's Pride Park, which offers covered picnic areas. Following a dike north along the Cowlitz River from the park, the trail...
WA 1.9 mi Asphalt
As its name implies, the Seaside Promenade is a north-south route along the Pacific Ocean in the Oregon coastal community of Seaside. The Prom, as it's affectionately known, dates back to the 1920s...
OR 1.5 mi Concrete
The Warrenton Waterfront Trail runs for nearly 5 miles through the small city of Warrenton, located near where the mighty Columbia River empties into the Pacific Ocean in northwestern Oregon. Portions...
OR 4.7 mi Asphalt
An adventure awaits those who tackle all, or part, of the 56-mile-long Willapa Hills Trail in southwestern Washington. The former Northern Pacific Railway line rolls through remote farm and forestland...
WA 56 mi Asphalt, Ballast, Crushed Stone, Grass, Gravel

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Trails by activity

Recent Trail Reviews

Willapa Hills Trail

Lebam West to Menlo Link open

August, 2019 by geoduck87

My mothers family is from the area, and lived in Lebam, so was interested in riding a section. Happened upon a local who said that the edges of trail were mowed at least yearly to keep branches and blackberry vines back and this section was being finished. Thanks to info re: getting on from Robertson Rd, I located the very small entrance and rode about 3 miles W to the Trap Creek Bridge. Trail reminiscent of a very long private road with 2 small single tracks and some grassy patches. Doable on cross bike or better.

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

Banks Veronia state park

May, 2019 by aaronerez

21 miles, 13 bridges

Discovery Trail

AN ABSOLUTE DELIGHT

February, 2019 by thejake91739

This easy, twisting, smooth, well-maintained asphalt trail meanders through wavy, grass covered sand dunes along the longest, flattest beach in the United States. To say this ride is beautiful is an understatement. The views are awesome, and the art, historical markers, and other information along the trail greatly enhance the enjoyment.
We traveled all the way from SoCal to experience this and to check off another state in our quest to bike all fifty, so we have especially fond memories of our September 2013 morning on the Discovery Trail. To make a day of it, consider visiting the nearby lighthouses and the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center!

Accordion

Astoria Riverwalk

A MORNING WELL SPENT

February, 2019 by thejake91739

In September of 2013 my wife and I biked the Astoria Riverwalk from end to end. For a couple of newly retired southern California teachers, it was our first out of California bike ride. (We're determined to bike in all fifty states, and this trail got us off to a good start.)
We had to dodge the occasional walker, trolley, car, dog walkers, deal with some treacherous gaps in boards, and even a brief shower, but the joys of the ride far outweighed some minor inconveniences.
There are wonderful and spectacular views of the Columbia River, clean air, charming Astoria architecture, seals, wild blackberries, a coast guard base, history galore, and the piece de resistance: the Columbia River Maritime Museum where we parked our bikes and spent a couple of hours.
It's a short, flat, easy, scenic, historical experience perfect for families and/or those who like to travel at a leisurely pace.
We were inspired to ride this trail thanks to an article in an issue of Rails To Trails magazine several years ago, and we were not disappointed. It was definitely a morning well spent!

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

January Ride

January, 2019 by ruthiekozak

It was pea soup outside this past Sunday and cold. I read mixed reviews about this trail and about the state it is in. It was in really good shape so I'm not sure what some folks are talking about. Yes, there are some areas that are a little more rough and you need to slow down. We did the full ride, 21 miles from Banks to Vernonia and 21 miles back. The worst parts of the trail were around mile 5 and closer to Vernonia. That being said, it is not bad. Just slow down and pay attention. Most troubled areas are clearly marked.

My only regret is doing the ride on a 30 pound cruiser. Not the bike to use on this trail although my thighs are made of solid steel now. It's a steady incline after mile 5-ish until about mile 12-ish and boy, was I feeling it! Coming back from Vernonia took us way less time as there is less of an upward climb and my body was numb to the pain. I will be returning because this trail is awesome but I will use a lighter, more ergonomically correct bike.

Enjoy the ride or walk! Don't leave your trash or dog poop on the trail!

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

The truth about logging, rural life and merging life as it is today is done with great thought and the ability to merge the past into the current gracefully!

January, 2019 by mommamb

This trail was built with love, over a long period of time, with multiple users intended. The trail is a connection between small towns with rich historical value. This trail project is intended to be continue reaching onward to Scappoose and potentially other towns looping back to Portland then completing the loop back to Banks or continuing toward the coastal communities and then returning to the original beginning as funding and land rights are available. The project will continue to grow with interest and self sustaining interest and ideas. These ‘Trails’ have done a great job of making themselves friendly for multiple users, from families spending a few hours outside seeing how rich our coastal mountains (even our own rain forests) to the most serious bike riders to weekend horseback riding beginners or highly organized groups. If you can walk your going to enjoy the time you spend on this trail. If you want to start at the beginning, middle or end of this trail you will be able to see why the pioneers would risk the lives of the entire family to come start new lives. I would suggest that you take the time to gather the free information available before you get going on this trail. Having even the basic information you can begin a conversation that will spark the interest of the most aloof people. Looking into the areas historical background would add photos of logging that are hard to imagine! Some of the logs cut and moved with old fashioned people power and horses! Imagine what it would be like to move fallen trees to the trains, using only the simplest of tools will amaze young and old alike. A picture is worth a thousand words and still doesn’t even begin to come close to what you’re able to see with even a few historical photos and stories in hand. Being able to see how much hard work was done by prior generations and how carefully the land has been managed by our past generations is quite humbling. (I have seen some photos where the photographer tried to explain how the horses & wagons with men standing on top of the horses wouldn’t fill the the trees vertically or horizontally) Locally owned logging companies go to great lengths to re-planet and insure the health of the new trees, leaving a variety of trees still standing during each cutting. Making the least known impact on every new section cut. Creating a rapidly filled new habitat and limiting the impact of heavy equipment. Longview Fiber has ownership over much of the land on the PNW trail areas between Banks & Vernonia. They have been eager to demonstrate best practices of land management, wood and wood products/byproducts and the operations used in creating new products. They also have information available to interested audiences. I agree that going along a trail and then bursting out into the middle of a clear cutting area isn’t beautiful. These areas are designed to provide the best recovery possible for the next set of trees, they are watched over, carefully cared for, trimmed and thinned. They grow quickly and within 10 years walking through the area the only thing you might notice is almost all the trees are the same age. I dreaded the time when the property adjacent to mine would be clear cut. After many years of watching the process and reading the most recent documents in best case scenarios I learned how much care Longview Fiber provides for the property they own and manage. I was also surprised at the public access they allow, not if they have a active cut happening for obvious safety reasons. Take the time to review the information from many angles. Find a solution to the abuse of paper products just used in USA. It is truly a complex problem The history and information available for this trail is interesting and telling of how the PNW came to life and provided a living for hard working families

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

Banks Vernonia Trail

November, 2018 by huskydad40

Very scenic ride but trail at times very rough. Needs work!

Crown Zellerbach Trail

pebble creek mainline

October, 2018 by functionforest

mainline

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

Trail deteriorating fast and shares logging access...

September, 2018 by appleeducator

I was very excited about this trail last year when I first discovered it. That Fall, I attempted to ride and wiped out on one of the many slippery bridges. This summer I was back and astonished at how much the asphalt in many areas is rutting, crumbling, and breaking apart. I mean really dangerous! The Stubbs Stewart section is in great shape however. But what really turned me off, is the aggressive logging and clear cutting taking place along many sections of the trail. The logging vehicles even share the trail. I bike rails to trails like this to get away from these sad destructive scenes, but no longer can you on this trail - it is in the Oregon culture as one native told me. I will not be coming back!

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

Won’t be back until maintenance is done

September, 2018 by fourringspdx

Used to ride this trail very regularly but no more. The past couple years it’s seen a serious decline. Very rough, rutted and bumpy. How do you acquire potholes in a bike/walking trail?!?

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

In need of repair!

August, 2018 by jdunlop58

It has been a couple of years since I hit this trail with my road bike and I was pretty amazed and a little disappointed at the lack of maintenance. It is a beautiful trail with fairly easy grades and nice shade. I did the entire length of 42 miles from Banks to Vernonia and back, approximately 2 1/2 hours. The issue is the heaving of asphalt which on a road bike is jarring, to the point of being dangerous if you are in the shade and don't see it coming. On a fat tire bike, not so much. Again, it could be a great trail, but the state or whoever is responsible needs to spend a dime, i.e., our tax dollars, and get it in better shape. Thank you!

Banks-Vernonia State Trail

Check it off my trial list

August, 2018 by wyattrj

Did the entire trail in one ride starting in Banks on a hot day, so all the trees were nice. As mentioned the trail starts a steady incline at about 5 miles and continues for the next 7 or so. Pretty rough in a number of places. The bridges mentioned in the trail description are pretty much all a couple inches higher than the trail which means a pretty sizeable bump up/down. The bad spots are marked with orange paint but you need to pay attention. I found the Stubbs State Park to be pretty easy to miss, could be because you need to climb another hill to get up to it and I wasn't that motivated by that point. The downhill section on the return trip to banks was great, but with the rough trail and bridges pay attention. Overall I am not a big fan.

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