Cave Spring, VA Hiking Trails and Maps

287 Reviews

Looking for the best Hiking trails around Cave Spring?

Find the top rated hiking trails in Cave Spring, whether you're looking for an easy short hiking trail or a long hiking trail, you'll find what you're looking for. Click on a hiking trail below to find trail descriptions, trail maps, photos, and reviews.

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Activities
Length
Surfaces
Type
22 Results
Activities
Length
Surfaces
Type

Chessie Nature Trail

7 mi
State: VA
Dirt, Gravel

Craig County Greenway Trail

0.95 mi
State: VA
Crushed Stone

Dick & Willie Passage Rail Trail

4.5 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Greenbrier River Trail

77 mi
State: WV
Gravel

Hanging Rock Battlefield Trail

1.7 mi
State: VA
Gravel

Huckleberry Trail

7.9 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Jackson River Scenic Trail

14.3 mi
State: VA
Gravel

James River Foot Bridge

0.12 mi
State: VA
Boardwalk

James River Heritage Trail (Blackwater Creek Natural Area)

9.5 mi
State: VA
Asphalt, Dirt, Woodchips

Lick Run Greenway

4.2 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Mason Creek Greenway

1.2 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Mill Mountain Greenway

3.2 mi
State: VA
Asphalt, Concrete

Mud Lick Creek Greenway

0.5 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Murray Run Greenway

1.9 mi
State: VA
Cinder, Concrete, Dirt, Woodchips

New River Trail State Park

57.7 mi
State: VA
Crushed Stone

Potts Valley Rail Trail

4.5 mi
State: WV
Dirt, Grass

Riverway Trail (Radford)

3.2 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Roanoke River Greenway

13.6 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Tinker Creek Greenway

1.3 mi
State: VA
Asphalt
Accordion

Uptown Spur Trail

0.7 mi
State: VA
Asphalt

Wolf Creek Greenway

2.2 mi
State: VA
Asphalt, Cinder, Gravel
Trail Image Trail Name States Length Surface Rating
The Chessie Nature Trail travels through breathtaking rural Virginia countryside, following mile markers left behind by the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad that ran this route. Dont be surprised if you...
VA 7 mi Dirt, Gravel
The Greenway Trail is a one-mile path of finely crushed limestone that is located just outside of New Castle. The trail runs mostly on Craigs Creek Road (VA-615), but starts at a kiosk mimicing a...
VA 0.95 mi Crushed Stone
The Dick & Willie Passage Rail Trail runs for 4.5 miles on a former Danville & Western Railroad corridor, which was acquired by Southern Railway in 1920 and ultimately abandoned by its successor,...
VA 4.5 mi Asphalt
West Virginia's beautiful Greenbrier River Trail is one of America's premier rail-trails and popular with bicyclists, hikers, walkers and cross-country skiers. Most of the trail runs along the...
WV 77 mi Gravel
Opened in 1999, the Hanging Rock Battlefield Trail in Salem (just outside of Roanoke) is associated with Southern Virginia's impressive Civil War history. The northern trailhead at Hanging Rock was...
VA 1.7 mi Gravel
In the early 1900s, a train line nicknamed “the Huckleberry” was built to transport coal and provide mail and passenger service to Blacksburg. The line was also used by the Corps cadets at Virginia...
VA 7.9 mi Asphalt
Waterfalls, river views, rugged rock formations, vibrant fall foliage and delicate flowers in the spring: These are the sights that put the “scenic” in Jackson River Scenic Trail. The serene...
VA 14.3 mi Gravel
The James River Foot Bridge carries the Appalachian Trail over the James River in Snowden, Virginia, approximately 20 miles northwest of Lynchburg. The bridge was built on the piers of a demolished...
VA 0.12 mi Boardwalk
The James River Heritage Trail in the Blackwater Creek Natural Area is one of the premier urban trails in the state, passing through lush forest as well as the heart of historic, industrial downtown...
VA 9.5 mi Asphalt, Dirt, Woodchips
The Lewisburg and Ronceverte Trail (commonly known as the L&R Trail) will one day connect these two historic towns set amid the Allegheny Mountains of southern West Virginia. The beautiful natural...
WV 0.4 mi Asphalt
Lick Run Greenway begins in downtown Roanoke and heads north just over 4 miles to end between Huff Lane Park and Valley View Mall. Along the way, the paved pathway traverses two parks: Washington Park...
VA 4.2 mi Asphalt
The Mason Creek Greenway Trail follows its namesake creek closely, stretching for over a mile. The trail starts on Roanoke Boulevard and heads north, sliding between an office complex and a mobile...
VA 1.2 mi Asphalt
The Mill Mountain Greenway provides residents and visitors to Roanoke with a nice connection from the city's downtown to Mill Mountain Park. Within the park, you can explore numerous hiking trails,...
VA 3.2 mi Asphalt, Concrete
The trail is known as the Mud Lick Creek Greenway trail since it follows the route of the nearby waterway. Alternatively, some folks refer to it as the Garst Mill Park Greenway, after the park whose...
VA 0.5 mi Asphalt
The Murray Run Greenway winds through a section of the City of Roanoke. The greenway trail is multipurpose, with a varying surface of cinder, woodchips and concrete sidewalk. The width of the trail...
VA 1.9 mi Cinder, Concrete, Dirt, Woodchips
Southern Virginia's New River Trail is one of America's premier rail-trails and has been designated as an official National Recreation Trail by the US Department of the Interior. It is also a state...
VA 57.7 mi Crushed Stone
The Potts Valley Rail Trail is built upon an abandoned corridor of the Norfolk and Western Branch rail line. Called the Potts Valley Branch, it operated between 1909 and 1932 and was built to haul...
WV 4.5 mi Dirt, Grass
The 3.5-mile Riverway Trail provides a non-motorized pathway to the best of what Radford has to offer. A good place to begin is Bisset Park, though you can really start anywhere thanks to the multiple...
VA 3.2 mi Asphalt
The Roanoke River Greenway will one day span 25 miles between Roanoke and Salem along its namesake waterway. Currently, much of the paved pathway is already in place and runs through a wide variety of...
VA 13.6 mi Asphalt
The Tinker Creek Greenway winds through Roanoke's east end from Fallon Park to just over a mile southeast. Along your journey, you'll be closely paralleling the pleasantly wooded Tinker...
VA 1.3 mi Asphalt
Accordion
Martinsville's Uptown Spur Trail, as its name implies, runs along an abandoned railroad spur line. Like the trains before its conversion, the paved trail branches off from the former main line—now the...
VA 0.7 mi Asphalt
The Wolf Creek Greenway follows its namesake waterway for two miles through Vinton on the outskirts of Roanoke in western Virginia. Its surface is mostly cinder and gravel with a few short asphalt...
VA 2.2 mi Asphalt, Cinder, Gravel

Now, More Than Ever, Trails Matter!

During COVID-19, trails are being counted on as places where people can find solace and respite and we need your support to keep trails open and provide these critical FREE resources! Please continue to practice physical distancing and check the status of your trail before heading out!

Trails by activity

Recent Trail Reviews

New River Trail State Park

Exppensive

May, 2020 by btweede

Went to visit friends in Pulaski over the weekend. Weather was nice so i stopped at trail parking before heading home. Cost $7.00 for an hours walk. Ridiculous! Need a better system. No other trail i have been on charges for parking.

Tinker Creek Greenway

fun for families

May, 2020 by lo2wise

Good family ride. Connects to Roanoke River Trail.

Dick & Willie Passage Rail Trail

New section trailhead on Spruce Street Gorgeous and Musical

February, 2020 by saxapahawnc

Section 6B recently opened the trailhead with parking and restroom on Spruce Street, without exact address at Mulberry Creek (approx 1990 Spruce Street). It's about a half mile past Brookdale merging with Spruce at the Carilion Clinics and Spruce Street Station. After another follow up lab or doctor visit, hiking with the dog on Dick and Willie Passage is therapeutic. Minimal street noise at the parking lot, new evergreens lining the trailhead and new restroom facility, this is a tranquil spot to relax, breathe, and enjoy gorgeous scenery on highly maintained paved trails with excellent drainage.

Trail signs dot the length of the trail, easily sighted to stay on trail along creek, Country Club Drive, then more asphalt paved, densely wooded trail. Calls of frogs and creek water tinkling accompanied us the first quarter mile. The sounds of the river rushing picked up after Country Club Drive ended, as we were east of Smith River, again on well-sign marked asphalt trail, until a pond behind the sports complex.

Dog poop bag stations and a couple trash receptacles would be excellent to keep the trail as clean as possible while hiking and biking. The gravel flanking the asphalt and drainage/swales engineered along the trail kept water and mud off-trail, making this as dry as possible after multiple days of precipitation, or snow melting, more recently. I and the paws were dry, a perk we don't get in our own currently muddy yard. Excellent addition to parks and trails in Henry County. We plan to drive down solely for trail hiking and picnicking with the furry family in tow.

Accordion

Chessie Nature Trail

Awesome!

December, 2019 by misty.r.brown

This is a well maintained trail that takes you from a high trafficked trail, through less trafficked cow pastures (DONT FORGET TO CLOSE THE GATES) next to the Maury River between Lexington and Buena Vista. My husband and I love running the Chessie especially when we are logging marathon training miles. Definitely a must run if you are in the area. If you love it ~ there is a marathon and 1/2 marathon on the Chessie in mid October. You can always check in with the locals at the Lexington Running Shop on Main Street to see if there is a group run upcoming on the trails. 😀👍 Always better with friends. Run Happy Y’all!

Greenbrier River Trail

a bit disappointing

November, 2019 by jeree

My husband, sister and I rode the trail end to end and back this past summer. We are from Pittsburgh and have the Great Allegheny Passage trail that runs from pittsburgh to Cumberland Maryland, about 150 miles. So I am a bit spoiled having the best trail in the country, in my opinion, in my backyard. The Greenbrier River trail was disappointing. The trail surface was bad. It was basically two narrow tire tracks with grass in the middle taking up most of the trail. You can’t take your eyes off the trail to look at the scenery because of the trail surface being so narrow. There are almost no amenities on the trail, just the one town of Marlinton at mile marker 55, and a convenience store in the town of Seebert, but there are picnic tables and port-a-potties often along the trail. There are few choices of overnight accommodations. We started in Cass and stayed at the Bear Creek Lodge,It was close to the trail, nothing fancy and it had food on the first floor. Our next stop was in Seebert. We where lucky enough to find the Hillsboro House B&B, about two miles from the trail at Jack Hornes Cornes convenience store in Seebert. It was a great place to stay. But it is an uphill climb from the trail. I recommend not taking the road there, it was very busy with no berm, take Burnside rd. to Workmen rd. to Denmar rd. That takes you right to The Hillsboro House. At the end of the trail near Caldwell, we stayed at The Greenbrier River Cabin, it was beautiful and right at the end of the trail. There are just not a lot of amenities close, just a convenience store about a mile away, again on a very busy road with no berm. We had pizza delivered to the cabin. Due to the radio wave tower in the town of Green Bank, you probably will not have cell service on the trail. We had no service the entire trip until we got to Caldwell. We have done long distance bike trips (200 miles) every summer for the last 10 years in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York, Missouri, and Michigan. This is a trail I would not recommend. Although the scenery in West Virginia is breathtaking ,the trail is remote and the trail surface was not good. Had the trail been in better condition I would rate this trail higher.

New River Trail State Park

Must do trail. Will be back !!!

October, 2019 by rawieland

If you start Galax you will be rewarded with great warmup to Fries Junction and fantastic bridge over New River. Go for it and ride to park headquaters at Foster Falls. The shot tower was interesting. Lots of horses on trial near Ivanoe- so ride careful ;-). Too bad you cant ride across dams on river. Relax and Enjoy. RustyWieland

Greenbrier River Trail

2 day bike and camp 9-28-19

October, 2019 by nathan.hendrick

We loved this trail. My family and friends are 100% amateur bike riders. We parked at the south end at Caldwell and shuttled up with Chuck at All Sports to Cass. We hit the trail at 830 am and biked 47.3 miles the first day. It took us until about 6 that evening to reach camp. But that was with lots of stops including the grocery store in Marlinton and water and ice cream at Jack Horner Corner in Seabert. Which is an awesome store with bike parts accessories rentals beer pizza food etc. super nice place.
We camped at a designated spot in hammocks. The bathrooms where nicer than expected. All the water wells had water that I recommend you use. The trail was clean and mowed recently. No over hanging brush or tall grass. There were lots of places to get in the river. The calls are well cared for and have fire pits. It even appeared that the forest guys leave the fallen trees cut into firewood blocks trail side. We finished up the remain miles on day two and ended around 3pm. It was me (36) my wife (40) my friend (39) and our kids. 14 13 and 12. The kids had a blast and let the pack both days.
I’m super impressed With this trail system and we plan to
Make this trip annually. I would suggest if your a amateur rider to do it in 3 days. So you can relax and enjoy camp
More.

New River Trail State Park

Beautiful Leisurely ride

October, 2019 by dragonstudio1

We had such a great time bike-packing the New River Trail State Park. We took the Northbound route from Galax. We parked our car in Pulaski and got a shuttle from New River Outdoors. They were fantastic! Once we arrived in Galax its a short 2-3 miles to Cliffview Campground where we spent the first night. We stayed at site #3 which was possibly the best spot in the campground. The bathrooms were clean and there was drinking water there. They even had fire wood for $6 a bundle. Each site had posts for hammocks as well and site areas were large with a picnic table and hanger for food and bags. On day two we headed out toward Foster Falls. We stopped A LOT along the way to take in views and read signs. There are bathrooms and water sources along the way. It was a VERY leisurely ride. Most of the trail is very flat and had some low grade downhills. There are a few primitive first come first served campsites near Fries. Definitely stop off at Shot Tower and take a tour. They also have heated bathrooms there. Foster Falls Campgrounds were a little bigger than Cliffview. They have two camp stores with snacks, gear and more. Firewood is also available at the store. All the sites also included hammock posts, food hook and large areas for tents. We stayed at site #9 which was right on the river and had amazing views. Water and pit toilet were available but a little walk back up to the parking area. Day 3 we headed back to the car in Pulaski. This section doesn't have as many views or bridges but the bridges it does have are higher and have beautiful trusses. You are mostly riding through properties and towns on this section. If you have a chance you should stop off at Bryson's General Store in Draper for some snacks and BBQ. It was a nice treat. The last 7 miles or so have a slight incline. So just be prepared to constantly peddle. Up until that point the majority of the trip was downhill. The entire trail is extremely easy. Oh! Also if you like to mountain bike you should definitely plan to stop off at the new mountain biking trails as well. It's definitely worth the time. We only did the first 1 mile loop but we were glad we did! We are definitely planning to come back at some point with our wives and children.

Greenbrier River Trail

The Most Scenic Section

September, 2019 by tedmcgarry

I am a section cyclist who over time has completed all sections of the 77 mile Trail. The Trail has no bad sections. Traillink’s Greenbrier River Trail description and reviews give complete and accurate information on the Trail. I will not repeat. I share three observations.

First, if you have time to do only one section, this is the one. It is in the Northern Section between Clover Lick southward to Sharp’s Tunnel and bridge. This Trail section has the most scenic and remote mountains. It is a ‘gorge’ with the mountains sloping down to each side of the River with a mountain sharing the Trail on one side. No roads or houses for 5 miles. Two of the greatest landmarks on the trail are in this section. They are Sharp’s Tunnel and the adjacent curved bridge over the Greenbrier River. Hey, it’s the reason they are shown on the cover of the State Parks’ brochure.

Second, the fastest trip to Clover Lick, Cass and the Northern trailheads is from the East side of the River. From Marlinton the trip uses some combination of WV routes: 39, 28, 92, 66 depending on the trailhead. Note: The Clawson/Thorny Creek trailhead is on the end of a painful and s-l-o-w drive on a rough steep gravel road for 5 miles which takes 15 minutes. I have a front wheel drive minivan, but I made it out. Instead, I recommend access to this fine Trail portion by taking the Trail from Marlinton or Clover Lick.

The Northern trailheads can also be reached from Marlinton on the West side of the River using US 219 to County Road 1 immediately north of Marlinton. Know that this route is scenic but slower as it is a rural, paved and one lane shared road in many places.

Finally, the Greenbrier River Trail State Park reviews can be found on two web sites. You found one. The other is Trip Advisor which is free. You have to query ‘West Virginia’ and run through the menus to find the Trail listing. In Sept. 2019 there were 120 reviews. Trip Advisor rates the Trail as # 11 of 169 Outdoor Activities in WV. I have cross posted this review.

Potts Valley Rail Trail

Such potential, so poorly maintained

September, 2019 by earleirwin

Rode from NE trailhead, finding the first mile plus nearly impossible to bike. Treacherous descent / ascent through area of former trestle (pushed / pulled bike, cannot imagine riding it). Many downed trees and branches at intervals the entire length. Although we pulled smaller ones that we could manage, off the trail, significant more remain, most will require tools. Good signage, including reflective markers through the first section where the trail is nearly indiscernible; mileage designations would be helpful. Recommend riding from SW trailhead 3 miles to trestle site, then turn around and ride back. Those 3 miles scenic, with the trail elevated through woodlands. No mountain views while trees in leaf. Consider that elevation rises from NE to SW.

Greenbrier River Trail

60th Birthday trip

August, 2019 by cathiwells

My husband surprised me with a trip to this trail for my birthday! We started at the south end and did the first 11 miles (in and back out) and then rode the northern section from Cass down to Marlinton on the 2nd day and the 3rd day went from Marlinton to Beard. It was honestly the best surface on a Rail Trail that I’ve seen... The terrain is pretty well flat (I think it descends 740 feet over 78 miles) and is an easy ride for any level of rider. Not a lot of places to stop to get water, snacks or food so carry all that with you. We didn’t get to finish all the trail but will be going back. My favorite part was from Marlinton to Beard though.

Greenbrier River Trail

Great ride over three days

August, 2019 by sherpa2trees

My husband, 7 year old son, and I rode this trail over three days on our hybrid bicycles. Cass to Marlinton (about 25 miles), Marlinton to Renick (almost 32 miles) and Renick to Caldwell (about 21 miles). There is a slight downhill slope if you begin at Cass and end at Caldwell. The only exception was around mile 13 where it appears that there was a rockslide and the best way for the trail maintainers to fix the trail was to build a short, moderately steep incline and equally short and moderate decline on the other side.
We arranged a shuttle with Chuck at Appalachian Sports in Marlinton for the first 2 days and a shuttle with Bobby and Cyndi at Free Spirit Adventures in Caldwell for the 3rd day. All of them were very helpful and friendly.
The trail itself was fairly well maintained, with occasional brush sticking out into the pathway and only one blowdown for which we had to dismount and push our bicycles over the branches. The surface is mainly crushed gravel with a few miles of pavement approaching and leaving Marlinton.
The trail is generally 15-30 feet above the river, sometimes veering away from it, and has river access at various points, the best access was in the final section between Renick and Caldwell. We saw multiple people swimming in the relatively shallow Greenbrier River in this section.
There are outhouses, water pumps, and campsites or shelters scattered along the way, but you definitely want to pack your own water. If you wanted to bike camp and had the map, it would easily be doable. We plan to do this in a future trip.
We thoroughly enjoyed our ride, despite the temperatures being in the high 80s/low90s and took advantage of the river access and water pumps to stay cool.

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