Wasco, CA Birding Trails and Maps

35 Reviews

Looking for the best Birding trails around Wasco?

Find the top rated birding trails in Wasco, whether you're looking for an easy short birding trail or a long birding trail, you'll find what you're looking for. Click on a birding trail below to find trail descriptions, trail maps, photos, and reviews.

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Activities
Length
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5 Results
Activities
Length
Surfaces
Type

Kern River Parkway Trail

30 mi
State: CA
Asphalt

Taft Rails to Trails

1.4 mi
State: CA
Asphalt

Porterville Rails to Trails Parkway

1.3 mi
State: CA
Asphalt, Concrete

Santa Fe Trail (Visalia)

2.5 mi
State: CA
Asphalt

Santa Fe Trail (Tulare)

5 mi
State: CA
Asphalt, Dirt
Trail Image Trail Name States Length Surface Rating
The Kern River Parkway Trail spans the east–west length of Bakersfield along the Kern River, a waterway that drains the Sierra Nevada range but is often dry by the time it reaches the inland city....
CA 30 mi Asphalt
Taft Rails to Trails is a short pathway across the small city that is situated on the southwestern edge of the San Joaquin Valley. The trail occupies a corridor formerly home to the Sunset Railroad,...
CA 1.4 mi Asphalt
The Porterville Rails to Trails Parkway is a short converted right-of-way of the San Joaquin Valley Railroad through the town of Porterville. The arrow-straight trail runs between Walnut and Henderson...
CA 1.3 mi Asphalt, Concrete
Visalia's Santa Fe Trail extends south from the core of the city to its rural agricultural fringes. The northern half of the trail occupies a former Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad corridor...
CA 2.5 mi Asphalt
The 19th-century railroad-building boom brought the town of Tulare into existence in California’s Central Valley. More than 100 years later, the town transformed a former railroad spur into the Santa...
CA 5 mi Asphalt, Dirt

Recent Trail Reviews

Kern River Parkway Trail

Central Valley Joy Ride

January, 2024 by dmurphy52

Traveling by car through the Central Valley over a hundred times during the past fifty years, I've never paused to ride a bicycle in Bakersfield. Mistake! The Kern River Parkway Trail is a way above average opportunity to take a break from the monotony of Highway 99 or I-5, get in a good ride, and get back in your car with the invigoration that a two-wheeled adventure virtually always brings.

I did the length of the trail in two parts. Daty 1, headed south to SoCal on 99, I parked at Yokuts Park (plenty of parking, easily accessible off 99) and rode east. The trail itself is wide, and smooth, well maintained, and without safety concerns. Specifically, though homelessness has been mentioned in previous posts about this path, no encampments encroached onto the path, and homeless folks numbered less than ten over the roughly sixtteen mile round trip. I got a bit confused at Manor St. : stay right, look for the narrow tunnel that goes under the street. The hills mentioned in the official description and previous posts are not steep, easily negotiable by even a mildly fit rider. I did not ride the streets to the disconnected far east portion of the trail, but will next time

On my return trip headed back home (Merced) on 99, I parked again at Yokuts Park, and headed west for a 28 mile round trip ride to the western end of the trail. What a delight! Again, the trail was wide, clean, traveling largely along water, safe, for all ages and levels of riders. Previous postings about tumble weeds....didn't see any. Again, no street crossings, as the path uses underpasses for all roads, a marvelous piece of engineering. If you're a birder, bring your binoculars, you'll be travelling along extensive wetlands. The trail drops about 400 feet in elevation over 14 miles, hardly noticeable going either downstream along the Kern, or upstream on the way back. My sense of public safety seemed to be confirmed by the many families that I encountered on foot or on bikes. The speedster bicyclists were polite, and the width of the path made it easy for the tortoises and the hares, the pedestirans and the dog walkers to get along.

This path is a beauty, an achievement of forward thinking and an excellent investment in the public good. It's easily accessible from either I-5 or Highway 99. If you're passing through Bakersfield, you'll be richly rewarded by pausing to try it out. I rode it in January (58 degrees), for summer riders, be well prepared for the heat, which can be lethal.

Kern River Parkway Trail

Nice Trail but….

November, 2023 by tntdavis

It’s a nice, paved trail but lots of homeless camped along it and have large dogs off leash. Also lots of garbage…Bakersfield needs to clean it up. Also never have seen such a squirrel infestation as their parks have

Kern River Parkway Trail

I have ridden this trail all the way. It is a very good trail,but from Enos Lane to Buena Vista Lake, it needs the tumble weeds cleaned up and from Hwy 119 to Buena Vista Lake all the broken glass and trash cleaned up to bring it up to par.

September, 2023 by tleetan

I have ridden this trail all the way. It is a very good trail,but from Enos Lane to Buena Vista Lake, it needs the tumble weeds cleaned up and from Hwy 119 to Buena Vista Lake all the broken glass and trash cleaned up to bring it up to par.

Accordion

Kern River Parkway Trail

Impressive scenic trail

August, 2023 by bethredeker1

We have used this trail several times. We have not gone on the entire trail but we have ridden 35 miles. We prefer to go west on it as it is more scenic and there are not any homeless or sketchy areas. If you go east you will encounter many homeless people and the area doesn’t seem safest. We have not been bothered by the homeless, it is just a little uncomfortable seeing some using drugs, as we have a teenage daughter. Overall this trail is well kept. You can tell the city cares deeply about this trail. It’s in our top 10 in the country!

Santa Fe Trail (Visalia)

Nice trail into downtown Visalia

June, 2021 by qd5rwxzxh6

My wife and I ride this trail quite often and enjoy the easy access from our part of town to downtown Visalia. The trail is on a north/south axis and is paved and well signed. It stops a couple of blocks short of downtown but the road is wide and an easy 3 block bike ride or walk to the east side of downtown, not far from the transit station.

Kern River Parkway Trail

fantastic trail

May, 2020 by nevenante

I have been using it for the past three years almost every weekend. I enter the trail off of Mohawk being that I live near by. Going East the landscape is more varied in comparison to going west. Each side has its own type of beauty. The trail is mostly asphalt and very well maintained. I really like the fact that there is no place on the trail for cars to cross so you do not need to stop for traffic. You can ride non-stop the whole 22 miles.

Kern River Parkway Trail

South End Nicest

February, 2020 by acewickwire

Location: Bakersfield, CA
Parking: The Park at River Walk & Kern River Parkway park
Trail Condition: Excellent wide asphalt pathway. Well maintained.
Signage: No directional route signage. We did have to stop at one location and review our map. Otherwise route is mostly obvious. There is plenty of “rules” signage. Would be a nice improvement to provide directional route signage.
Comments: We rode this in two sections. First starting at the “Park at the River” and riding south to the trail end. This portion of the trail enters the open space/ground water banking area outside of town. The wide trail gets away from traffic and city noise. We spotted roadrunners, a coyote, and lots of other birds and animals along the trail. Every so far are some benches and at one time had some sort of emergency phone system but they are in the process of removing. A number of other cyclists were encountered on the trail, most offered a wave or friendly hi. Back in the urban part of the trail a number of walkers were also on the trail. Obviously a popular trail.
Section two started at Kern River Parkway park and traveled north. Trail remained mostly in good condition. Since this section goes through the main part of the city the scenery is as can be expected with housing, traffic, and shelters in the trees along the river bed. Once passed through the urban setting the trail is a little bit more “country” but isn’t nearly as long as the southern end of the trail. Plenty of folks out enjoying a sunny Saturday afternoon on the trail.
Highly recommend the southern portion of the trail.

Taft Rails to Trails

Rails to Trails

November, 2019 by nickismom1228

I walk this path every day. There are two new sections, one at each end so it's much longer than the 1.4. I would like to know the distance myself. There are water fountains that include dog basins. It a nice pleasant walk. Many people bike and or run.

Kern River Parkway Trail

Western 14 miles - smooth trail

February, 2019 by cindylrowe

This is a very well maintained bike trail. The western section is very rural for the last 8 or 10 miles - not terribly scenic but there are tons of rabbits, ground squirrels, roadrunners and hawks to entertain you. It is an easy, flat ride. We parked at Yokuts Park and rode west to the end. Next time, we'd like to ride the eastern end of the trail.

Kern River Parkway Trail

Great Ride

October, 2016 by carellano_tl

I have been doing this trail since I moved to Bakersfield 24 years ago. Mostly flat, and in the summer it is very hot. The city keeps the trail clean. There are emergency call phones about every mile. There is water in the developed areas, but if you go to the west there is no water on the west end 8 mile stretch. If you have the desire, you can bike from about I-5 in the valley, all the way to Lake Ming, about 28 miles one-way.

Kern River Parkway Trail

love it.

August, 2016 by nevenante

the variations in landscape scenery are adorable.

Kern River Parkway Trail

West end Kern River Bikeway

January, 2016 by danbridge

Started at Chester in BF and rode west. Nice flat trail. Plenty of benches and water fountains along the way. It goes by Cal state BF, and the Brighthouse amphitheater. Once you get past Allen ave, you go into the great wide open called the "Bakersfield 2800" It's 2800 acres of watershed/flood control that I assume is controlled by the state. No water. No toilets. No food for about 10 miles. They have a signed gate that gives you fair warning about this area. You will be in the middle of nowhere. In June, the rattlesnakes come out of hibernation and sun themselves on the warm asphalt. Be on the lookout! You may also encounter foxes, coyotes, squirrels, rabbits, roadrunners and red tailed hawks. The trail finally ends up at Enos lane just north of I-5. Still, in the middle of nowhere.

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Accordion

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